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Cardoso, Ana Cláudia Vieira
[PMID]:29236907
[Au] Autor:Picoloto LA; Cardoso ACV; Cerqueira AV; Oliveira CMC
[Ad] Endereço:Faculdade de Filosofia e Ciências da Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - Marília (SP), Brasil.
[Ti] Título:Effect of delayed auditory feedback on stuttering with and without central auditory processing disorders.
[Ti] Título:Efeito da retroalimentação auditiva atrasada na gagueira com e sem alteração do processamento auditivo central..
[So] Source:Codas;29(6):e20170038, 2017 Dec 07.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] País de publicação:Brazil
[La] Idioma:por; eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: To verify the effect of delayed auditory feedback on speech fluency of individuals who stutter with and without central auditory processing disorders. METHODS: The participants were twenty individuals with stuttering from 7 to 17 years old and were divided into two groups: Stuttering Group with Auditory Processing Disorders (SGAPD): 10 individuals with central auditory processing disorders, and Stuttering Group (SG): 10 individuals without central auditory processing disorders. Procedures were: fluency assessment with non-altered auditory feedback (NAF) and delayed auditory feedback (DAF), assessment of the stuttering severity and central auditory processing (CAP). Phono Tools software was used to cause a delay of 100 milliseconds in the auditory feedback. The "Wilcoxon Signal Post" test was used in the intragroup analysis and "Mann-Whitney" test in the intergroup analysis. RESULTS: The DAF caused a statistically significant reduction in SG: in the frequency score of stuttering-like disfluencies in the analysis of the Stuttering Severity Instrument, in the amount of blocks and repetitions of monosyllabic words, and in the frequency of stuttering-like disfluencies of duration. Delayed auditory feedback did not cause statistically significant effects on SGAPD fluency, individuals with stuttering with auditory processing disorders. CONCLUSION: The effect of delayed auditory feedback in speech fluency of individuals who stutter was different in individuals of both groups, because there was an improvement in fluency only in individuals without auditory processing disorder.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtornos da Percepção Auditiva/fisiopatologia
Gagueira/fisiopatologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Retroalimentação Sensorial/fisiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Índice de Gravidade de Doença
Percepção da Fala/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 2150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27778048
[Au] Autor:Parsa B; Zatsiorsky VM; Latash ML
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Kinesiology, Rec.Hall-268N, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802, USA.
[Ti] Título:Optimality and stability of intentional and unintentional actions: II. Motor equivalence and structure of variance.
[So] Source:Exp Brain Res;235(2):457-470, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1106
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We address the nature of unintentional changes in performance in two papers. This second paper tested hypotheses related to stability of task-specific performance variables estimated using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis. Our first hypothesis was that selective stability of performance variables would be observed even when the magnitudes of those variables drifted unintentionally because of the lack of visual feedback. Our second hypothesis was that stability of a variable would depend on the number of explicit task constraints. Subjects performed four-finger isometric pressing tasks that required the accurate production of a combination of total moment and total force with natural or modified finger involvement under full visual feedback, which was removed later for some or all of the salient variables. We used inter-trial analysis of variance and drifts in the space of finger forces within the UCM and within the orthogonal to the UCM space. The two variance components were used to estimate a synergy index stabilizing the force/moment combination, while the two drift components were used to estimate motor equivalent and non-motor equivalent force changes, respectively. Without visual feedback, both force and moment drifted toward lower absolute magnitudes. The non-motor equivalent component of motion in the finger force space was larger than the motor equivalent component for variables that stopped receiving visual feedback. In contrast, variables that continued to receive visual feedback showed larger motor equivalent component, compared to non-motor equivalent component, over the same time interval. These data falsified the first hypothesis; indeed, selective stabilization of a variable over the duration of a trial allows expecting comparably large motor equivalent components both with and without visual feedback. Adding a new constraint (presented as a target magnitude of middle finger force) resulted in a drop in the synergy index in support of the second hypothesis. We interpret the force drift as a natural relaxation process toward states with lower potential energy in the physical (physiological) system involved in the task. The results show that presenting sensory feedback on a performance variable makes synergies stabilizing that variable dependent on that particular sensory feedback.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Intenção
Movimento/fisiologia
Desempenho Psicomotor/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Análise de Variância
Retroalimentação Sensorial/fisiologia
Feminino
Dedos/fisiologia
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180201
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180201
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00221-016-4806-2


  3 / 2150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29199445
[Au] Autor:Arbeiter M; Petermann S; Hoppe U; Bohr C; Doellinger M; Ziethe A
[Ad] Endereço:1 Department of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology, ENT clinic, University hospital Erlangen, Medical school, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Analysis of the Auditory Feedback and Phonation in Normal Voices.
[So] Source:Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol;127(2):89-98, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1943-572X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the auditory feedback mechanisms and voice quality during phonation in response to a spontaneous pitch change in the auditory feedback. Does the pitch shift reflex (PSR) change voice pitch and voice quality? Quantitative and qualitative voice characteristics were analyzed during the PSR. METHOD: Twenty-eight healthy subjects underwent transnasal high-speed video endoscopy (HSV) at 8000 fps during sustained phonation [a]. While phonating, the subjects heard their sound pitched up for 700 cents (interval of a fifth), lasting 300 milliseconds in their auditory feedback. The electroencephalography (EEG), acoustic voice signal, electroglottography (EGG), and high-speed-videoendoscopy (HSV) were analyzed to compare feedback mechanisms for the pitched and unpitched condition of the phonation paradigm statistically. Furthermore, quantitative and qualitative voice characteristics were analyzed. RESULTS: The PSR was successfully detected within all signals of the experimental tools (EEG, EGG, acoustic voice signal, HSV). A significant increase of the perturbation measures and an increase of the values of the acoustic parameters during the PSR were observed, especially for the audio signal. CONCLUSIONS: The auditory feedback mechanism seems not only to control for voice pitch but also for voice quality aspects.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Retroalimentação Sensorial
Fonação
Nível de Percepção Sonora
Acústica da Fala
Qualidade da Voz
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Eletroencefalografia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Laringoscopia
Masculino
Gravação em Vídeo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180123
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180123
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171205
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0003489417744567


  4 / 2150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29216307
[Au] Autor:Sugano Y; Keetels M; Vroomen J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Industrial Management, Kyushu Sangyo University, Fukuoka, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Audio-motor but not visuo-motor temporal recalibration speeds up sensory processing.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189242, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Perception of synchrony between one's own action (a finger tap) and the sensory feedback thereof (a visual flash or an auditory pip) can be recalibrated after exposure to an artificially inserted delay between them (temporal recalibration effect: TRE). TRE might be mediated by a compensatory shift of motor timing (when did I tap?) and/or the sensory timing of the feedback (when did I hear/see the feedback?). To examine this, we asked participants to voluntarily tap their index finger at a constant pace while receiving visual or auditory feedback (a flash or pip) that was either synced or somewhat delayed relative to the tap. Following this exposure phase, they then performed a simple reaction time (RT) task to measure the sensory timing of the exposure stimulus, and a sensorimotor synchronization (SMS) task (tapping in synchrony with a flash or pip as pacing stimulus) to measure the point of subjective synchrony between the tap and pacing stimulus. The results showed that after exposure to delayed auditory feedback, participants tapped earlier (~21.5 ms) relative to auditory pacing stimuli (= temporal recalibration) and reacted faster (~5.6 ms) to auditory stimuli. For visual exposure and test stimuli, there were no such compensatory effects. These results indicate that adjustments of audio-motor synchrony can to some extent be explained by a change in the speed of auditory sensory processing. We discuss this in terms of an attentional modulation of sensory processing.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Percepção Auditiva
Retroalimentação Sensorial
Atividade Motora
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180122
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180122
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189242


  5 / 2150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29200430
[Au] Autor:Hietanen MA; Price NSC; Cloherty SL; Hadjidimitrakis K; Ibbotson MR
[Ad] Endereço:National Vision Research Institute, Australian College of Optometry, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Long-term sensorimotor adaptation in the ocular following system of primates.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189030, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The sudden movement of a wide-field image leads to a reflexive eye tracking response referred to as short-latency ocular following. If the image motion occurs soon after a saccade the initial speed of the ocular following is enhanced, a phenomenon known as post-saccadic enhancement. We show in macaque monkeys that repeated exposure to the same stimulus regime over a period of months leads to progressive increases in the initial speeds of ocular following. The improvement in tracking speed occurs for ocular following with and without a prior saccade. As a result of the improvement in ocular following speeds, the influence of post-saccadic enhancement wanes with increasing levels of training. The improvement in ocular following speed following repeated exposure to the same oculomotor task represents a novel form of sensori-motor learning in the context of a reflexive movement.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Fisiológica
Aprendizagem/fisiologia
Acompanhamento Ocular Uniforme/fisiologia
Movimentos Sacádicos/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Retroalimentação Sensorial
Macaca nemestrina
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171229
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171229
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171205
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189030


  6 / 2150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29215237
[Au] Autor:Pankova NB; Lebedeva MA; Khlebnikova NN; Karganov MY
[Ti] Título:[Age-related changes of the latent period of simple sensorimotor reaction to the light stimuli in both men and women with different body mass index].
[So] Source:Patol Fiziol Eksp Ter;60(1):11-6, 2016 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0031-2991
[Cp] País de publicação:Russia (Federation)
[La] Idioma:rus
[Ab] Resumo:The study of the relationship of the latent period of simple sensorimotor reaction to the light stimulus and body mass index (BMI) in males and females aged 30-60 years (n = 507) was done. The boundary between the low (below Me - 1SD) and middle (from Me - 1SD to Me + 1SD) BMI was the value of 22.74 kg/m2, the boundary between the middle and high (above Me + 1SD) BMI - 33.16kg/m2. It is shown thatthere isan increase inthe proportion of people with high BMI with age (faster and more pronounced - in women). Sensorimotor reaction latency to the light stimuli does not change in men, and declines with agein women. However the data obtained indicate that developed with age alimentary obesity does not adversely affect neurophysiological parameters of the sensorimotor reactivity.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Envelhecimento/fisiologia
Índice de Massa Corporal
Retroalimentação Sensorial/fisiologia
Luz
Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171208
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 2150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29184207
[Au] Autor:Jaepel J; Hübener M; Bonhoeffer T; Rose T
[Ad] Endereço:Synapses - Circuits - Plasticity, Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, Martinsried, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Lateral geniculate neurons projecting to primary visual cortex show ocular dominance plasticity in adult mice.
[So] Source:Nat Neurosci;20(12):1708-1714, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1546-1726
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Experience-dependent plasticity in the mature visual system is widely considered to be cortical. Using chronic two-photon Ca imaging of thalamic afferents in layer 1 of binocular visual cortex, we provide evidence against this tenet: the respective dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) cells showed pronounced ocular dominance (OD) shifts after monocular deprivation in adult mice. Most (86%), but not all, of dLGN cell boutons were monocular during normal visual experience. Following deprivation, initially deprived-eye-dominated boutons reduced or lost their visual responsiveness to that eye and frequently became responsive to the non-deprived eye. This cannot be explained by eye-specific cortical changes propagating to dLGN via cortico-thalamic feedback because the shift in dLGN responses was largely resistant to cortical inactivation using the GABA receptor agonist muscimol. Our data suggest that OD shifts observed in the binocular visual cortex of adult mice may at least partially reflect plasticity of eye-specific inputs onto dLGN neurons.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dominância Ocular/fisiologia
Corpos Geniculados/citologia
Corpos Geniculados/fisiologia
Plasticidade Neuronal/fisiologia
Neurônios/fisiologia
Córtex Visual/citologia
Córtex Visual/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Cegueira/patologia
Retroalimentação Sensorial/fisiologia
Agonistas GABAérgicos/farmacologia
Corpos Geniculados/efeitos dos fármacos
Masculino
Camundongos
Muscimol/farmacologia
Plasticidade Neuronal/efeitos dos fármacos
Neurônios/efeitos dos fármacos
Neurônios Aferentes/fisiologia
Tálamo/citologia
Tálamo/fisiologia
Visão Binocular/fisiologia
Vias Visuais/citologia
Vias Visuais/fisiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (GABA Agonists); 2763-96-4 (Muscimol)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171212
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171212
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41593-017-0021-0


  8 / 2150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27777640
[Au] Autor:Osborn L; Kaliki R; Soares A; Thakor N
[Ad] Endereço:PhD student in Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.
[Ti] Título:Neuromimetic Event-Based Detection for Closed-Loop Tactile Feedback Control of Upper Limb Prostheses.
[So] Source:IEEE Trans Haptics;9(2):196-206, 2016 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2329-4051
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Upper limb amputees lack the valuable tactile sensing that helps provide context about the surrounding environment. Here we utilize tactile information to provide active touch feedback to a prosthetic hand. First, we developed fingertip tactile sensors for producing biomimetic spiking responses for monitoring contact, release, and slip of an object grasped by a prosthetic hand. We convert the sensor output into pulses, mimicking the rapid and slowly adapting spiking responses of receptor afferents found in the human body. Second, we designed and implemented two neuromimetic event-based algorithms, and , on a prosthesis to create a local closed-loop tactile feedback control system (i.e. tactile information is sent to the prosthesis). Grasping experiments were designed to assess the benefit of this biologically inspired neuromimetic tactile feedback to a prosthesis. Results from able-bodied and amputee subjects show the average number of objects that broke or slipped during grasping decreased by over 50% and the average time to complete a grasping task decreased by at least 10% for most trials when comparing neuromimetic tactile feedback with no feedback on a prosthesis. Our neuromimetic method of closed-loop tactile sensing is a novel approach to improving the function of upper limb prostheses.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Membros Artificiais/provisão & distribuição
Biomimética/métodos
Retroalimentação Sensorial/fisiologia
Tato/fisiologia
Extremidade Superior/inervação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Força da Mão/fisiologia
Seres Humanos
Extremidade Superior/patologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171127
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171127
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 2150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28982706
[Au] Autor:Blangero A; Kelly SP
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biomedical Engineering, The City College of The City University of New York, New York, New York 10031.
[Ti] Título:Neural Signature of Value-Based Sensorimotor Prioritization in Humans.
[So] Source:J Neurosci;37(44):10725-10737, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1529-2401
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In situations in which impending sensory events demand fast action choices, we must be ready to prioritize higher-value courses of action to avoid missed opportunities. When such a situation first presents itself, stimulus-action contingencies and their relative value must be encoded to establish a value-biased state of preparation for an impending sensorimotor decision. Here, we sought to identify neurophysiological signatures of such processes in the human brain (both female and male). We devised a task requiring fast action choices based on the discrimination of a simple visual cue in which the differently valued sensory alternatives were presented 750-800 ms before as peripheral "targets" that specified the stimulus-action mapping for the upcoming decision. In response to the targets, we identified a discrete, transient, spatially selective signal in the event-related potential (ERP), which scaled with relative value and strongly predicted the degree of behavioral bias in the upcoming decision both across and within subjects. This signal is not compatible with any hitherto known ERP signature of spatial selection and also bears novel distinctions with respect to characterizations of value-sensitive, spatially selective activity found in sensorimotor areas of nonhuman primates. Specifically, a series of follow-up experiments revealed that the signal was reliably invoked regardless of response laterality, response modality, sensory feature, and reward valence. It was absent, however, when the response deadline was relaxed and the strategic need for biasing removed. Therefore, more than passively representing value or salience, the signal appears to play a versatile and active role in adaptive sensorimotor prioritization. In many situations such as fast-moving sports, we must be ready to act fast in response to sensory events and, in our preparation, prioritize courses of action that lead to greater rewards. Although behavioral effects of value biases in sensorimotor decision making have been widely studied, little is known about the neural processes that set these biases in place beforehand. Here, we report the discovery of a transient, spatially selective neural signal in humans that encodes the relative value of competing decision alternatives and strongly predicts behavioral value biases in decisions made ∼500 ms later. Follow-up manipulations of value differential, reward valence, response modality, sensory features, and time constraints establish that the signal reflects an active, feature- and effector-general preparatory mechanism for value-based prioritization.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tomada de Decisões/fisiologia
Retroalimentação Sensorial/fisiologia
Desempenho Psicomotor/fisiologia
Recompensa
Córtex Sensório-Motor/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Eletroencefalografia/métodos
Potenciais Evocados/fisiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Estimulação Luminosa/métodos
Tempo de Reação/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171117
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171117
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171007
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1164-17.2017


  10 / 2150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28951449
[Au] Autor:Bourguignon M; Piitulainen H; Smeds E; Zhou G; Jousmäki V; Hari R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering and Aalto NeuroImaging, Aalto University School of Science, 00076 AALTO, Espoo, Finland, mabourgu@ulb.ac.be.
[Ti] Título:MEG Insight into the Spectral Dynamics Underlying Steady Isometric Muscle Contraction.
[So] Source:J Neurosci;37(43):10421-10437, 2017 Oct 25.
[Is] ISSN:1529-2401
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:To gain fundamental knowledge on how the brain controls motor actions, we studied in detail the interplay between MEG signals from the primary sensorimotor (SM1) cortex and the contraction force of 17 healthy adult humans (7 females, 10 males). SM1 activity was coherent at ∼20 Hz with surface electromyogram (as already extensively reported) but also with contraction force. In both cases, the effective coupling was dominant in the efferent direction. Across subjects, the level of ∼20 Hz coherence between cortex and periphery positively correlated with the "burstiness" of ∼20 Hz SM1 (Pearson ≈ 0.65) and peripheral fluctuations ( ≈ 0.9). Thus, ∼20 Hz coherence between cortex and periphery is tightly linked to the presence of ∼20 Hz bursts in SM1 and peripheral activity. However, the very high correlation with peripheral fluctuations suggests that the periphery is the limiting factor. At frequencies <3 Hz, both SM1 signals and ∼20 Hz SM1 envelope were coherent with both force and its absolute change rate. The effective coupling dominated in the efferent direction between (1) force and the ∼20 Hz SM1 envelope and (2) the absolute change rate of the force and SM1 signals. Together, our data favor the view that ∼20 Hz coherence between cortex and periphery during isometric contraction builds on the presence of ∼20 Hz SM1 oscillations and needs not rely on feedback from the periphery. They also suggest that effective cortical proprioceptive processing operates at <3 Hz frequencies, even during steady isometric contractions. Accurate motor actions are made possible by continuous communication between the cortex and spinal motoneurons, but the neurophysiological basis of this communication is poorly understood. Using MEG recordings in humans maintaining steady isometric muscle contractions, we found evidence that the cortex sends population-level motor commands that tend to structure according to the ∼20 Hz sensorimotor rhythm, and that it dynamically adapts these commands based on the <3 Hz fluctuations of proprioceptive feedback. To our knowledge, this is the first report to give a comprehensive account of how the human brain dynamically handles the flow of proprioceptive information and converts it into appropriate motor command to keep the contraction force steady.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Retroalimentação Sensorial/fisiologia
Força da Mão/fisiologia
Contração Isométrica/fisiologia
Magnetoencefalografia/métodos
Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia
Córtex Sensório-Motor/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Neurorretroalimentação/métodos
Estimulação Luminosa/métodos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171117
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171117
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170928
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0447-17.2017



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