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[PMID]:28841527
[Au] Autor:Crocker DR; Lawrence AJ
[Ad] Endereço:Brook House, Dam Lane, Leavening, North Yorkshire, YO17 9SJ, UK. Electronic address: joe_crocker@btinternet.com.
[Ti] Título:Estimating the potential effects of pesticide seed treatments on the reproductive success of arable birds.
[So] Source:Ecotoxicol Environ Saf;147:124-131, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2414
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In temperate zones, seeds of spring-sown crops may be an attractive food source for breeding farmland birds. We modelled the effects of pesticide seed treatments on the reproductive success of 4 UK arable bird species (Rook, Linnet, Skylark, Yellowhammer) exposed to treated seeds of 3 spring-sown crops (beans, barley and linseed). We ran three types of model, 1) a "broods-at-risk" model looking at the temporal overlap between nesting and seed-sowing dates, and estimating the proportion of those nests that suffered toxicity-exposure ratios < 5; 2) a "seasonal success" Markov chain model estimating the number of chicks successfully raised in the course of a breeding season.; and 3) the potential effects of pesticides on population growth rates. Based on physiology, Rooks, should be less at risk from treated seeds than smaller species because bigger birds eat less as a proportion of their bodyweights. However, in nearly all our scenarios, Rooks were more vulnerable, followed by Skylark and Linnet, with Yellowhammer being least affected. A principal cause is that Rooks are more likely to be breeding at a time when treated seeds are being sown. Furthermore, whereas the other species may make several breeding attempts and early failures from pesticide exposure may be compensated by later successes, Rooks breed only once in a season. The results are also supported by historical evidence of Rook population declines following pesticide seed treatments.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Produtos Agrícolas/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Poluentes Ambientais/toxicidade
Modelos Teóricos
Passeriformes/fisiologia
Praguicidas/toxicidade
Reprodução/efeitos dos fármacos
Sementes/crescimento & desenvolvimento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ingestão de Alimentos
Monitoramento Ambiental
Poluentes Ambientais/farmacologia
Cadeias de Markov
Praguicidas/farmacologia
Reino Unido
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Environmental Pollutants); 0 (Pesticides)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170826
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29265788
[Au] Autor:Jezewska-Zychowicz M; Guzek D
[Ad] Endereço:Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Human Nutrition and Consumer Sciences, Department of Organization and Consumption Economics, Warsaw, Poland
[Ti] Título:Associations between adult perception of body weight, diet, preparing meals and dietary patterns
[So] Source:Rocz Panstw Zakl Hig;68(4):381-387, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0035-7715
[Cp] País de publicação:Poland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Background: The links between dietary patterns, the perception of one's body weight and diet as well preparing meals are poorly recognised in the literature. In order to develop effective nutritional education and focused interventions, more of such information is thereby required to improve the nation's health Objective: To identify dietary patterns based on declared food consumption rates and subject responses on whether dieting, perception of body weight and diet and preparing meals are linked to such dietary patterns Material and methods: The survey was conducted in 2016 on 344 consumers chosen for age (20-65 years) and their consent for study participation. Rates of eating the foods selected were measured using a 7-point scale. Cluster analysis was used to identify three dietary patterns of behaviour: 'potentially beneficial to health', 'potentially unfavourable for health; deficient' and 'potentially unfavourable for health; excessive'. The analysis was performed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 23.0 Results: There were significantly more subjects showing 'potentially beneficial for health' behaviour, normal body weight, those dieting (whether now or in the past) and those who evaluated their diet as being very good or good compared to other groups. They were also more involved in preparing their meals at home. Differences were found between the 'unfavourable for health' dietary patterns concerning subject's involvement in meal preparation. The dietary pattern for 'deficient' behaviour found lower rates of those preparing their meals at home Conclusions: The pattern of potentially beneficial dietary habits was linked to weight control through a slimming diet and greater involvement in the preparation of food for consumption. The results show the need to develop food choice skills rather than just transferring knowledge in the nutrition education process
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dieta/psicologia
Comportamento Alimentar/psicologia
Preferências Alimentares/psicologia
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Peso Corporal Ideal
Refeições/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Índice de Massa Corporal
Análise por Conglomerados
Ingestão de Alimentos/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Percepção
Fatores Sexuais
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171222
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29220560
[Au] Autor:Jacques-Gagnon O; Lavertu V
[Ad] Endereço:Centre antipoison du Québec, CIUSSS de la Capitale-Nationale, Québec, Québec, Canada.
[Ti] Título:L'ingestion par des enfants de détergent à lessive ensaché..
[So] Source:Perspect Infirm;14(3):38-39, 2017 May-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1708-1890
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:fre
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Detergentes/envenenamento
Produtos Domésticos/envenenamento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Criança
Ingestão de Alimentos
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Detergents)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180306
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180306
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171209
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29365346
[Au] Autor:Hodder RK; Stacey FG; O'Brien KM; Wyse RJ; Clinton-McHarg T; Tzelepis F; James EL; Bartlem KM; Nathan NK; Sutherland R; Robson E; Yoong SL; Wolfenden L
[Ad] Endereço:Hunter New England Population Health, Hunter New England Local Health District, Locked Bag 10, Wallsend, Australia, 2287.
[Ti] Título:Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD008552, 2018 01 25.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Insufficient consumption of fruits and vegetables in childhood increases the risk of future chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness, cost effectiveness and associated adverse events of interventions designed to increase the consumption of fruit, vegetables or both amongst children aged five years and under. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and Embase to identify eligible trials on 25 September 2017. We searched Proquest Dissertations and Theses and two clinical trial registers in November 2017. We reviewed reference lists of included trials and handsearched three international nutrition journals. We contacted authors of included studies to identify further potentially relevant trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials, including cluster-randomised controlled trials and cross-over trials, of any intervention primarily targeting consumption of fruit, vegetables or both among children aged five years and under, and incorporating a dietary or biochemical assessment of fruit or vegetable consumption. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of identified papers; a third review author resolved disagreements. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risks of bias of included studies; a third review author resolved disagreements. Due to unexplained heterogeneity, we used random-effects models in meta-analyses for the primary review outcomes where we identified sufficient trials. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs) to account for the heterogeneity of fruit and vegetable consumption measures. We conducted assessments of risks of bias and evaluated the quality of evidence (GRADE approach) using Cochrane procedures. MAIN RESULTS: We included 55 trials with 154 trial arms and 11,108 participants. Thirty-three trials examined the impact of child-feeding practices (e.g. repeated food exposure) in increasing child vegetable intake. Thirteen trials examined the impact of parent nutrition education in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake. Eight studies examined the impact of multicomponent interventions (e.g. parent nutrition education and preschool policy changes) in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake. One study examined the effect of a nutrition intervention delivered to children in increasing child fruit and vegetable intake.We judged 14 of the 55 included trials as free from high risks of bias across all domains; performance, detection and attrition bias were the most common domains judged at high risk of bias for the remaining studies.Meta-analysis of trials examining child-feeding practices versus no intervention revealed a positive effect on child vegetable consumption (SMD 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15 to 0.61; n = 1509; 11 studies; very low-quality evidence), equivalent to a mean difference of 4.03 g of vegetables. There were no short-term differences in child consumption of fruit and vegetables in meta-analyses of trials examining parent nutrition education versus no intervention (SMD 0.11, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.28; n = 3023; 10 studies; very low-quality evidence) or multicomponent interventions versus no intervention (SMD 0.28, 95% CI -0.06 to 0.63; n = 1861; 4 studies; very low-quality evidence).Insufficient data were available to assess long-term effectiveness, cost effectiveness and unintended adverse consequences of interventions. Studies reported receiving governmental or charitable funds, except for three studies reporting industry funding. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Despite identifying 55 eligible trials of various intervention approaches, the evidence for how to increase children's fruit and vegetable consumption remains sparse. There was very low-quality evidence that child-feeding practice interventions are effective in increasing vegetable consumption in children aged five years and younger, however the effect size was very small and long-term follow-up is required. There was very low-quality evidence that parent nutrition education and multicomponent interventions are not effective in increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and younger. All findings should be considered with caution, given most included trials could not be combined in meta-analyses. Given the very low-quality evidence, future research will very likely change estimates and conclusions. Such research should adopt more rigorous methods to advance the field.This is a living systematic review. Living systematic reviews offer a new approach to review updating, in which the review is continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available. Please refer to the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for the current status of this review.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ingestão de Alimentos
Comportamento Alimentar
Frutas
Verduras
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Pré-Escolar
Condicionamento (Psicologia)
Visita Domiciliar
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
Recompensa
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180301
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180301
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub4


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[PMID]:29281635
[Au] Autor:Takahashi M; Takagi S
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Biological Science, Nagoya University Graduate School of Science Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Japan.
[Ti] Título:Optical silencing of body wall muscles induces pumping inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans.
[So] Source:PLoS Genet;13(12):e1007134, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7404
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Feeding, a vital behavior in animals, is modulated depending on internal and external factors. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the feeding organ called the pharynx ingests food by pumping driven by the pharyngeal muscles. Here we report that optical silencing of the body wall muscles, which drive the locomotory movement of worms, affects pumping. In worms expressing the Arch proton pump or the ACR2 anion channel in the body wall muscle cells, the pumping rate decreases after activation of Arch or ACR2 with light illumination, and recovers gradually after terminating illumination. Pumping was similarly inhibited by illumination in locomotion-defective mutants carrying Arch, suggesting that perturbation of locomotory movement is not critical for pumping inhibition. Analysis of mutants and cell ablation experiments showed that the signals mediating the pumping inhibition response triggered by activation of Arch with weak light are transferred mainly through two pathways: one involving gap junction-dependent mechanisms through pharyngeal I1 neurons, which mediate fast signals, and the other involving dense-core vesicle-dependent mechanisms, which mediate slow signals. Activation of Arch with strong light inhibited pumping strongly in a manner that does not rely on either gap junction-dependent or dense-core vesicle-dependent mechanisms. Our study revealed a new aspect of the neural and neuroendocrine controls of pumping initiated from the body wall muscles.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Optogenética/métodos
Músculos Faríngeos/metabolismo
Bombas de Próton/metabolismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Caenorhabditis elegans
Proteínas de Caenorhabditis elegans/metabolismo
Ingestão de Alimentos/fisiologia
Locomoção/fisiologia
Neurônios Motores/metabolismo
Músculo Esquelético/metabolismo
Faringe/metabolismo
Serotonina
Transdução de Sinais/fisiologia
Canais de Ânion Dependentes de Voltagem/genética
Canais de Ânion Dependentes de Voltagem/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins); 0 (Proton Pumps); 0 (Voltage-Dependent Anion Channels); 333DO1RDJY (Serotonin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pgen.1007134


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[PMID]:28748670
[Au] Autor:Taye M; Lee W; Caetano-Anolles K; Dessie T; Hanotte O; Mwai OA; Kemp S; Cho S; Oh SJ; Lee HK; Kim H
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Título:Whole genome detection of signature of positive selection in African cattle reveals selection for thermotolerance.
[So] Source:Anim Sci J;88(12):1889-1901, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1740-0929
[Cp] País de publicação:Australia
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:As African indigenous cattle evolved in a hot tropical climate, they have developed an inherent thermotolerance; survival mechanisms include a light-colored and shiny coat, increased sweating, and cellular and molecular mechanisms to cope with high environmental temperature. Here, we report the positive selection signature of genes in African cattle breeds which contribute for their heat tolerance mechanisms. We compared the genomes of five indigenous African cattle breeds with the genomes of four commercial cattle breeds using cross-population composite likelihood ratio (XP-CLR) and cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity (XP-EHH) statistical methods. We identified 296 (XP-EHH) and 327 (XP-CLR) positively selected genes. Gene ontology analysis resulted in 41 biological process terms and six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Several genes and pathways were found to be involved in oxidative stress response, osmotic stress response, heat shock response, hair and skin properties, sweat gland development and sweating, feed intake and metabolism, and reproduction functions. The genes and pathways identified directly or indirectly contribute to the superior heat tolerance mechanisms in African cattle populations. The result will improve our understanding of the biological mechanisms of heat tolerance in African cattle breeds and opens an avenue for further study.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Bovinos/genética
Bovinos/fisiologia
Estudos de Associação Genética/veterinária
Genoma/genética
Seleção Genética/genética
Termotolerância/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ingestão de Alimentos/genética
Ontologia Genética
Cor de Cabelo/genética
Haplótipos/genética
Resposta ao Choque Térmico/genética
Homozigoto
Temperatura Alta
Pressão Osmótica
Estresse Oxidativo/genética
Glândulas Sudoríparas
Sudorese/genética
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/asj.12851


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[PMID]:29402248
[Au] Autor:Al-Afifi NA; Alabsi AM; Bakri MM; Ramanathan A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Oral and Craniofacial Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
[Ti] Título:Acute and sub-acute oral toxicity of Dracaena cinnabari resin methanol extract in rats.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;18(1):50, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Dracaena cinnabari (DC) is a perennial tree that located on the Southern coast of Yemen native to the Socotra Island. This tree produces a deep red resin known as the Dragon's blood, the Twobrother's Blood or Damm Alakhwain. The current study performed to evaluate the safety of the DC resin methanol extract after a single or 28 consecutive daily oral administrations. METHODS: In assessing the safety of DC resin methanol extract, acute and sub-acute oral toxicity tests performed following OECD guidelines 423 and 407, respectively, with slight modifications. In acute oral toxicity test, DC resin methanol extract administered to female Sprague Dawley rats by oral gavage at a single dose of 300 and 2000 mg/kg body weight. Rats observed for toxic signs for 14 days. In sub-acute oral toxicity test, DC resin methanol extract administered to the rats by oral gavage at 500, 1000, and 1500 mg/kg body weight daily up to 28 days to male and female Spradgue Dawley rats. The control and high dose in satellite groups were also maintained and handled as the previous groups to determine the late onset toxicity of DC resin methanol extract. At the end of each test, hematological and biochemical analysis of the collected blood were performed as well as gross and microscopic pathology. RESULTS: In acute oral toxicity, no treatment-related death or toxic signs were observed. It revealed that the DC resin methanol extract could be well tolerated up to the dose 2000 mg/kg body weight and could be classified as Category 5. The sub-acute test observations indicated that there are no treatment-related changes up to the high dose level compared to the control. Food consumption, body weight, organ weight, hematological parameters, biochemical parameters and histopathological examination (liver, kidney, heart, spleen and lung) revealed no abnormalities. Water intake was significantly higher in the DC resin methanol extract treated groups compared to the control. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates tolerability of DC resin methanol extract administered daily for 28 days up to 1500 mg/kg dose.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dracaena/química
Resinas Vegetais/toxicidade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Administração Oral
Animais
Peso Corporal/efeitos dos fármacos
Ingestão de Líquidos/efeitos dos fármacos
Ingestão de Alimentos/efeitos dos fármacos
Feminino
Coração/efeitos dos fármacos
Rim/efeitos dos fármacos
Masculino
Metanol
Tamanho do Órgão/efeitos dos fármacos
Ratos
Ratos Sprague-Dawley
Resinas Vegetais/administração & dosagem
Testes de Toxicidade Aguda
Testes de Toxicidade Subcrônica
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Resins, Plant); Y4S76JWI15 (Methanol)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-018-2110-3


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[PMID]:29364939
[Au] Autor:Mishra S; Goldman JD; Sahyoun NR; Moshfegh AJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Association between dietary protein intake and grip strength among adults aged 51 years and over: What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011-2014.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191368, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:INTRODUCTION: Distributing daily protein intake evenly across meals (∼25-30g/meal) has been suggested to improve muscle mass. The aim of this research is to examine the association between grip strength, total protein intake and its distribution across day's meals in older adults. METHODS: Nationally representative dietary intake data of adults aged 51 years and older (n = 4,123) who participated in What We Eat in America, NHANES 2011-2014 were analyzed. Protein intake per day and per eating occasion (breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack) were determined. Combined grip strength was calculated and expressed in kilograms. Grip strength of individuals consuming ≥25g protein at 1 eating occasion was compared with those consuming same level of protein at 2 and 3 or more eating occasions. Grip strength of individuals in quartile 1 of daily protein intake was compared to those in the other quartiles. All associations were examined without and with adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, physical activity, health status, and smoking status. The comparison involving eating occasions and protein intake quartiles were further adjusted for daily protein intake and energy intake, respectively. RESULTS: Only 33% of men and 19% of women had protein intake of ≥25g at 2 or more eating occasions. These individuals also had higher grip strength and daily protein intake. Grip strength was positively associated with consumption of ≥25g protein at 2 eating occasions as compared to consumption of same level of protein at 1 eating occasion (p<0.05) in unadjusted model, but not when adjusted. Grip strength was positively associated with daily protein intake among women in quartiles 3 and 4 (p<0.05) of protein intake in both unadjusted and adjusted models compared to lowest protein intake. Among men, grip strength was associated with daily protein intake in quartiles 3 and 4 (p<0.05) in the unadjusted model, but not when adjusted. CONCLUSION: In a nationally representative sample of older adults, consuming ≥25g protein at 2 or more eating occasions was not associated with grip strength. However, higher daily protein intake was positively associated with grip strength in women.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Proteínas na Dieta/administração & dosagem
Força da Mão/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
Ingestão de Alimentos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Inquéritos Nutricionais
Fatores Sexuais
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Dietary Proteins)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191368


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[PMID]:29360850
[Au] Autor:Kant AK; Graubard BI
[Ad] Endereço:Dept. of Family, Nutrition, and Exercise Sciences, Queens College of the City University of New York, Flushing, New York, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:A prospective study of frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals and subsequent 9-year risk of all-cause and cardiometabolic mortality in US adults.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191584, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Restaurant prepared foods are known to be energy-dense and high in fat and sodium, but lower in protective nutrients. There is evidence of higher risk of adiposity, type II diabetes, and heart disease in frequent consumers of restaurant meals. However, the risk of mortality as a long-term health consequence of frequent consumption of restaurant meals has not been examined. We examined the prospective risk of all-cause and coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and diabetes (cardiometabolic) mortality in relation to frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals in a national cohort. We used frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals information collected in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, conducted from 1999-2004, with mortality follow-up completed through Dec. 31, 2011 (baseline age ≥ 40y; n = 9107). We estimated the relative hazard of all-cause and cardiometabolic mortality associated with weekly frequency of eating restaurant meals using Cox-proportional hazards regression methods to adjust for multiple covariates. All analyses accounted for complex survey design and included sample weights. Over 33% of all respondents reported eating ≥3 restaurant prepared meals/week. In this cohort, 2200 deaths due to all causes and 665 cardiometabolic deaths occurred over a median follow-up of 9 years. The covariate-adjusted hazard ratio of all cause or cardiometabolic mortality in men and women reporters of <1 or 1-2 restaurant prepared meals did not differ from those reporting ≥3 meals/week (P>0.05). The results were robust to effect modification by baseline BMI, years of education, and baseline morbidity. Expectedly, the 24-h dietary intakes of whole grains, fruits, dietary fiber, folate, vitamin C, potassium and magnesium at baseline were lower, but energy, energy density, and energy from fat were higher in more frequent restaurant meal reporters (P<0.05). Baseline serum HDL cholesterol, folate, and some carotenoids were inversely associated with the frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals (P<0.05); however, serum concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin, and c-reactive protein were unrelated (P<0.05). The weekly frequency of eating restaurant prepared meals and prospective risk of mortality after 9 years were not related in this cohort.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças Cardiovasculares/mortalidade
Causas de Morte
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/mortalidade
Ingestão de Alimentos
Restaurantes
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Estudos Prospectivos
Fatores de Risco
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180124
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191584


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[PMID]:29385177
[Au] Autor:Dickel F; Münch D; Amdam GV; Mappes J; Freitak D
[Ad] Endereço:Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyvaskyla, Jyvaskyla, Finland.
[Ti] Título:Increased survival of honeybees in the laboratory after simultaneous exposure to low doses of pesticides and bacteria.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191256, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Recent studies of honeybees and bumblebees have examined combinatory effects of different stressors, as insect pollinators are naturally exposed to multiple stressors. At the same time the potential influences of simultaneously occurring agricultural agents on insect pollinator health remain largely unknown. Due to different farming methods, and the drift of applied agents and manure, pollinators are most probably exposed to insecticides but also bacteria from organic fertilizers at the same time. We orally exposed honeybee workers to sub-lethal doses of the insecticide thiacloprid and two strains of the bacterium Enterococcus faecalis, which can occur in manure from farming animals. Our results show that under laboratory conditions the bees simultaneously exposed to the a bacterium and the pesticide thiacloprid thiacloprid had significant higher survival rates 11 days post exposure than the controls, which surprisingly showed the lowest survival. Bees that were exposed to diet containing thiacloprid showed decreased food intake. General antibacterial activity is increased by the insecticide and the bacteria, resulting in a higher immune response observed in treated individuals compared to control individuals. We thus propose that caloric restriction through behavioural and physiological adaptations may have mediated an improved survival and stress resistance in our tests. However, the decreased food consumption could in long-term also result in possible negative effects at colony level. Our study does not show an additive negative impact of sub-lethal insecticide and bacteria doses, when tested under laboratory conditions. In contrast, we report seemingly beneficial effects of simultaneous exposure of bees to agricultural agents, which might demonstrate a surprising biological capacity for coping with stressors, possibly through hormetic regulation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Abelhas/efeitos dos fármacos
Abelhas/microbiologia
Enterococcus faecalis/patogenicidade
Inseticidas/toxicidade
Neonicotinoides/toxicidade
Tiazinas/toxicidade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Abelhas/fisiologia
Ingestão de Alimentos/efeitos dos fármacos
Hormese
Inseticidas/administração & dosagem
Neonicotinoides/administração & dosagem
Polinização
Estresse Fisiológico
Tiazinas/administração & dosagem
Virulência
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Insecticides); 0 (Neonicotinoids); 0 (Thiazines); DSV3A944A4 (thiacloprid)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191256



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