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Pesquisa : G09.772.585.500 [Categoria DeCS]
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[PMID]:29400044
[Au] Autor:Vincent C
[Ti] Título:[The Bell Labs contributions to (singing) voice enginee­ring].
[So] Source:Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord);136(5):193-6, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0035-1334
[Cp] País de publicação:France
[La] Idioma:fre
[Ab] Resumo:While in «art¼ and «traditional¼ music, the nimbleness of the voice and the mastering of the vocal tone are put into pers­pective, in «popular¼ music, sound engineering takes the lead, and relegates the vocal virtuosity of the interpreter to second place. We propose to study here three technologies with contri­butions to music. All are developed and patented by the Bell Labs: The artificial larynx (and its derivatives, Sonovox and TalkBox), the vocoder and the speech synthesis. After a presen­tation of the source-filter theory, vital to these innovations, the principle of these three technologies is explained. A brief historical is outlined and is complemented by examples of films and musical selections depicting these processes. In light of these elements, we conclude: Sound engineering, and in parti­cular the modification of voice sonority, has become an indis­pensable component in the process of «pop¼ artistic musical creation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Laringe Artificial
Canto
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Engenharia Biomédica
Seres Humanos
Laringectomia/reabilitação
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29253921
[Au] Autor:McNamara RJ; Epsley C; Coren E; McKeough ZJ
[Ad] Endereço:Departments of Physiotherapy and Respiratory Medicine, Prince of Wales Hospital, Barker Street, Randwick, NSW, Australia, 2031.
[Ti] Título:Singing for adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;12:CD012296, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Singing is a complex physical activity dependent on the use of the lungs for air supply to regulate airflow and create large lung volumes. In singing, exhalation is active and requires active diaphragm contraction and good posture. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, chronic lung disease characterised by airflow obstruction. Singing is an activity with potential to improve health outcomes in people with COPD. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of singing on health-related quality of life and dyspnoea in people with COPD. SEARCH METHODS: We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Specialised Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization trials portal and PEDro, from their inception to August 2017. We also reviewed reference lists of all primary studies and review articles for additional references. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials in people with stable COPD, in which structured supervised singing training of at least four sessions over four weeks' total duration was performed. The singing could be performed individually or as part of a group (choir) facilitated by a singing leader. Studies were included if they compared: 1) singing versus no intervention (usual care) or another control intervention; or 2) singing plus pulmonary rehabilitation versus pulmonary rehabilitation alone. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened and selected trials for inclusion, extracted outcome data and assessed risk of bias. We contacted authors of trials for missing data. We calculated mean differences (MDs) using a random-effects model. We were only able to analyse data for the comparison of singing versus no intervention or a control group. MAIN RESULTS: Three studies (a total of 112 participants) were included. All studies randomised participants to a singing group or a control group. The comparison groups included a film workshop, handcraft work, and no intervention. The frequency of the singing intervention in the studies ranged from 1 to 2 times a week over a 6 to 24 week period. The duration of each singing session was 60 minutes.All studies included participants diagnosed with COPD with a mean age ranging from 67 to 72 years and a mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV ) ranging from 37% to 64% of predicted values. The sample size of included studies was small (33 to 43 participants) and overall study quality was low to very low. Blinding of personnel and participants was not possible due to the physical nature of the intervention, and selection and reporting bias was present in two studies.For the primary outcome of health-related quality of life, there was no statistically significant improvement in the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score (mean difference (MD) -0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.67 to 3.02, 2 studies, n = 58, low-quality evidence). However, there was a statistically significant improvement in the SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) score favouring the singing group (MD 12.64, 95% CI 5.50 to 19.77, 2 studies, n = 52, low-quality evidence). Only one study reported results for the other primary outcome of dyspnoea, in which the mean improvement in Baseline Dyspnoea Index (BDI) score favouring the singing group was not statistically significant (MD 0.40, 95% CI -0.65 to 1.45, 1 study, n = 30, very low-quality evidence).No studies examined any long-term outcomes and no adverse events or side effects were reported. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is low to very low-quality evidence that singing is safe for people with COPD and improves physical health (as measured by the SF-36 physical component score), but not dyspnoea or respiratory-specific quality of life. The evidence is limited due to the low number of studies and the small sample size of each study. No evidence exists examining the long-term effect of singing for people with COPD. The absence of studies examining singing performed in conjunction with pulmonary rehabilitation precludes the formulation of conclusions about the effects of singing in this context. More randomised controlled trials with larger sample sizes and long-term follow-up, and trials examining the effect of singing in addition to pulmonary rehabilitation, are required to determine the effect of singing on health-related quality of life and dyspnoea in people with COPD.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia
Qualidade de Vida
Canto/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
Dispneia/terapia
Seres Humanos
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180307
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180307
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD012296.pub2


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[PMID]:29265544
[Au] Autor:Tunc S; Münchau A
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Neurogenetics, University of Lübeck.
[Ti] Título:Boys in a famous choir: Singing and ticcing.
[So] Source:Ann Neurol;82(6):1029-1031, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1531-8249
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This informal observational study on the tic prevalence in 40 young singers was carried out during a public concert of Bach's Christmas Oratorio. Tics were highly prevalent (present in 35% = 14 boys). Given the possibility of an overrepresentation of perioral tics in this group of highly achieving young vocal artists, one might speculate that there is a relationship between the ability of the motor system to produce a surplus of movements (tics) and high performance (exquisite singing). Despite the unusual study design, with all its limitations, our observations strengthen the view that tics may be related to motor learning. However, alternative explanations, for example, that repetitive motor performance or personality traits in singers drive tic development, could also be true. In light of the boys choir's enchantment, the sole perception of tics as a disorder falls short of the properties of the motor system. Ann Neurol 2017;82:1029-1031.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Canto/fisiologia
Tiques/diagnóstico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Tiques/fisiopatologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180101
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180101
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171222
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ana.25112


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Silvério, Kelly Cristina Alves
[PMID]:28902229
[Au] Autor:Pinheiro J; Silverio KCA; Siqueira LTD; Ramos JS; Brasolotto AG; Zambon F; Behlau M
[Ad] Endereço:Faculdade de Odontologia de Bauru, Universidade de São Paulo - USP - Bauru (SP), Brasil.
[Ti] Título:Correlation between vocal tract symptoms and modern singing handicap index in church gospel singers.
[Ti] Título:Sintomas do trato vocal e índice de desvantagem vocal para o canto moderno em cantores evangélicos..
[So] Source:Codas;29(4):e20160187, 2017 Aug 24.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] País de publicação:Brazil
[La] Idioma:por; eng
[Ab] Resumo:Objective: To verify the correlation between vocal tract discomfort symptoms and perceived voice handicaps in gospel singers, analyzing possible differences according to gender. Methods: 100 gospel singers volunteered, 50 male and 50 female. All participants answered two questionnaires: Vocal Tract Discomfort (VTD) scale and the Modern Singing Handicap Index (MSHI) that investigates the vocal handicap perceived by singers, linking the results of both instruments (p<0.05). Results: Women presented more perceived handicaps and also more frequent and higher intensity vocal tract discomfort. Furthermore, the more frequent and intense the vocal tract symptoms, the higher the vocal handicap for singing. Conclusion: Female gospel singers present higher frequency and intensity of vocal tract discomfort symptoms, as well as higher voice handicap for singing than male gospel singers. The higher the frequency and intensity of the laryngeal symptoms, the higher the vocal handicap will be.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Canto
Distúrbios da Voz/diagnóstico
Qualidade da Voz
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Brasil
Estudos Transversais
Autoavaliação Diagnóstica
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Doenças Profissionais/diagnóstico
Qualidade de Vida
Religião
Fatores Sexuais
Inquéritos e Questionários
Distúrbios da Voz/classificação
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171005
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171005
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170914
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28434465
[Au] Autor:Stegemöller EL; Hibbing P; Radig H; Wingate J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Kinesiology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, United States. Electronic address: esteg@iastate.edu.
[Ti] Título:Therapeutic singing as an early intervention for swallowing in persons with Parkinson's disease.
[So] Source:Complement Ther Med;31:127-133, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6963
[Cp] País de publicação:Scotland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: For persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), secondary motor symptoms such as swallow impairment impact the quality of life and are major contributors to mortality. There is a present need for therapeutic interventions aimed at improving swallow function during the early stages of PD. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effects of a group therapeutic singing intervention on swallowing in persons with PD with no significant dysphagia symptoms. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: University in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four participants with PD. INTERVENTION: Eight weeks of group therapeutic singing. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Electromyography (EMG) was used to assess muscle activity associated with swallow pre and post the group singing intervention. Swallow quality of life (SWAL-QOL) and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) were also obtained pre- and post-intervention. RESULTS: Participants reported minimal difficulty with swallowing, yet results revealed a significant increase in EMG outcome measures, as well as significant improvement in UPDRS total and UPDRS motor scores. No significant differences were revealed for SWAL-QOL. CONCLUSION: Increases in EMG timing measures may suggest that group singing results in the prolongation of laryngeal elevation, protecting the airway from foreign material for longer periods of time during swallow. Combined with the improvement in UPDRS clinical measures, therapeutic singing may be an engaging early intervention strategy to address oropharyngeal dysphagia while also benefiting additional clinical symptoms of PD.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtornos de Deglutição
Musicoterapia/métodos
Doença de Parkinson
Canto
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
Estudos de Coortes
Deglutição
Transtornos de Deglutição/etiologia
Transtornos de Deglutição/terapia
Intervenção Precoce (Educação)
Eletromiografia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Doença de Parkinson/complicações
Doença de Parkinson/terapia
Qualidade de Vida
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170626
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170626
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170425
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28391305
[Au] Autor:Ang K; Maddocks M; Xu H; Higginson IJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore; King's College London, Cicely Saunders Institute, Division of Palliative Care, Policy and Rehabilitation.
[Ti] Título:The Effectiveness of Singing or Playing a Wind Instrument in Improving Respiratory Function in Patients with Long-Term Neurological Conditions: A Systematic Review.
[So] Source:J Music Ther;54(1):108-131, 2017 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:2053-7395
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Background: Many long-term neurological conditions adversely affect respiratory function. Singing and playing wind instruments are relatively inexpensive interventions with potential for improving respiratory function; however, synthesis of current evidence is needed to inform research and clinical use of music in respiratory care. Objective: To critically appraise, analyze, and synthesize published evidence on the effectiveness of singing or playing a wind instrument to improve respiratory function in people with long-term neurological conditions. Design: Systematic review of published randomized controlled trials and observational studies examining singing or playing wind instruments to improve respiratory function in individuals with long-term neurological conditions. Methods: Articles meeting specified inclusion criteria were identified through a search of the Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, CAIRSS for Music, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and AMED databases as early as 1806 through March 2015. Information on study design, clinical populations, interventions, and outcome measures was extracted and summarized using an electronic standardized coding form. Methodological quality was assessed and summarized across studies descriptively. Results: From screening 584 references, 68 full texts were reviewed and five studies included. These concerned 109 participants. The studies were deemed of low quality, due to evidence of bias, in part due to intervention complexity. No adverse effects were reported. Overall, there was a trend toward improved respiratory function, but only one study on Parkinson's disease had significant between-group differences. Conclusions: The positive trend in respiratory function in people with long-term neurological conditions following singing or wind instrument therapy is of interest, and warrants further investigation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Música
Doenças do Sistema Nervoso/complicações
Doenças do Sistema Nervoso/fisiopatologia
Respiração
Canto/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Viés
Seres Humanos
Estudos Observacionais como Assunto/normas
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/normas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170410
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jmt/thx001


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Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de
[PMID]:28327784
[Au] Autor:Costa JB; Ritto AP; Juste FS; Andrade CR
[Ad] Endereço:Universidade de São Paulo - USP - São Paulo (SP), Brasil.
[Ti] Título:Comparison between the speech performance of fluent speakers and individuals who stutter.
[Ti] Título:Comparação da performance de fala em indivíduos gagos e fluentes..
[So] Source:Codas;29(2):e20160136, 2017 Mar 16.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] País de publicação:Brazil
[La] Idioma:por; eng
[Ab] Resumo:Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the speech performance of fluent speakers and individuals who stutter during spontaneous speech, automatic speech, and singing. Methods: The study sample was composed of 34 adults, 17 individuals who stutter and 17 fluent controls, matched for gender and age. The speech performance of participants was compared by means of three tasks: monologue, automatic speech, and singing. The following aspects were assessed: total number of common disruptions and total number of stuttering-like disruptions. Results: Statistically significant difference was observed only for the monologue task in both intra- and inter-group comparisons. Conclusion: The outcomes of this study indicate that tasks of higher motor and melodic complexities, such as the monologue task, negatively affect the speech fluency of both fluent speakers and individuals who stutter.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fala/fisiologia
Gagueira/fisiopatologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Canto
Medida da Produção da Fala
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170706
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170706
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170323
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28325351
[Au] Autor:Woo P; Baxter P
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: peakwoo@peakwoo.com.
[Ti] Título:Flexible Fiber-Optic High-Speed Imaging of Vocal Fold Vibration: A Preliminary Report.
[So] Source:J Voice;31(2):175-181, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4588
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: High-speed video (HSV) imaging of vocal fold vibration has been possible only through the rigid endoscope. This study reports that a fiberscope-based high-speed imaging system may allow HSV imaging of naturalistic voicing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-two subjects were recorded using a commercially available black and white high-speed camera (Photron Motion Tools, 256 × 120 pixel, 2000 frames per second, 8 second acquisition time). The camera gain is set to +6 db. The camera is coupled to a standard fiber-optic laryngoscope (Olympus ENF P-4) with a 300-W Xenon light. Image acquisition was done by asking the subject to perform repeated phonation at modal phonation. Video images were processed using commercial video editing and video noise reduction software (After effects, Magix, and Neat Video 4.1). After video processing, the video images were analyzed using digital kymography (DKG). RESULTS: The HSV black and white video acquired by the camera is gray and lacks contrast. By adjustment of image contrast, brightness, and gamma and using noise reduction software, the flexible laryngoscopy image can be converted to video image files suitable for DKG and waveform analysis. The increased noise still makes edge tracking for objective analysis difficult, but subjective analysis of DKG plot is possible. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of HSV acquisition in an unsedated patient using a fiberscope. Image enhancement and noise reduction can enhance the HSV to allow extraction of the digital kymogram. Further image enhancement may allow for objective analysis of the vibratory waveform.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tecnologia de Fibra Óptica
Laringoscopia/métodos
Fonação
Gravação em Vídeo
Paralisia das Pregas Vocais/diagnóstico
Prega Vocal/fisiopatologia
Distúrbios da Voz/diagnóstico
Qualidade da Voz
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Estudos de Casos e Controles
Desenho de Equipamento
Feminino
Tecnologia de Fibra Óptica/instrumentação
Seres Humanos
Interpretação de Imagem Assistida por Computador
Quimografia
Laringoscópios
Laringoscopia/instrumentação
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Valor Preditivo dos Testes
Canto
Software
Fatores de Tempo
Vibração
Gravação em Vídeo/instrumentação
Paralisia das Pregas Vocais/fisiopatologia
Distúrbios da Voz/fisiopatologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170919
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170919
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170323
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28292666
[Au] Autor:Falk S; Kello CT
[Ad] Endereço:Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; Laboratoire Parole et Langage, UMR 7309, CNRS / Aix-Marseille University, Aix-en-Provence, France; Laboratoire Phonétique et Phonologie, UMR 7018, CNRS / Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris-3, Paris, France. Electronic address: simone.falk@univ-paris3.fr.
[Ti] Título:Hierarchical organization in the temporal structure of infant-direct speech and song.
[So] Source:Cognition;163:80-86, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7838
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Caregivers alter the temporal structure of their utterances when talking and singing to infants compared with adult communication. The present study tested whether temporal variability in infant-directed registers serves to emphasize the hierarchical temporal structure of speech. Fifteen German-speaking mothers sang a play song and told a story to their 6-months-old infants, or to an adult. Recordings were analyzed using a recently developed method that determines the degree of nested clustering of temporal events in speech. Events were defined as peaks in the amplitude envelope, and clusters of various sizes related to periods of acoustic speech energy at varying timescales. Infant-directed speech and song clearly showed greater event clustering compared with adult-directed registers, at multiple timescales of hundreds of milliseconds to tens of seconds. We discuss the relation of this newly discovered acoustic property to temporal variability in linguistic units and its potential implications for parent-infant communication and infants learning the hierarchical structures of speech and language.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Relações Mãe-Filho
Canto
Acústica da Fala
Fala
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Análise por Conglomerados
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Masculino
Fonética
Processamento de Sinais Assistido por Computador
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170830
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170830
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170316
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28282570
[Au] Autor:Katlowitz KA; Oya H; Howard MA; Greenlee JDW; Long MA
[Ad] Endereço:NYU Neuroscience Institute, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; Department of Otolaryngology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
[Ti] Título:Paradoxical vocal changes in a trained singer by focally cooling the right superior temporal gyrus.
[So] Source:Cortex;89:111-119, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1973-8102
[Cp] País de publicação:Italy
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The production and perception of music is preferentially mediated by cortical areas within the right hemisphere, but little is known about how these brain regions individually contribute to this process. In an experienced singer undergoing awake craniotomy, we demonstrated that direct electrical stimulation to a portion of the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG) selectively interrupted singing but not speaking. We then focally cooled this region to modulate its activity during vocalization. In contrast to similar manipulations in left hemisphere speech production regions, pSTG cooling did not elicit any changes in vocal timing or quality. However, this manipulation led to an increase in the pitch of speaking with no such change in singing. Further analysis revealed that all vocalizations exhibited a cooling-induced increase in the frequency of the first formant, raising the possibility that potential pitch offsets may have been actively avoided during singing. Our results suggest that the right pSTG plays a key role in vocal sensorimotor processing whose impact is dependent on the type of vocalization produced.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Temperatura Baixa
Canto
Lobo Temporal/fisiologia
Voz/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Craniotomia
Epilepsia/fisiopatologia
Epilepsia/cirurgia
Seres Humanos
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética
Masculino
Lobo Temporal/cirurgia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171009
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171009
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170311
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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