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  1 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29340521
[Au] Autor:Oliveira AR; Campos Neto AA; de Andrade MJO; de Medeiros PCB; Dos Santos NA
[Ad] Endereço:Departamento de Psicologia, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Campina Grande, PB, Brasil.
[Ti] Título:Organic solvent exposure and contrast sensitivity: comparing men and women.
[So] Source:Braz J Med Biol Res;51(3):e6568, 2018 Jan 11.
[Is] ISSN:1414-431X
[Cp] País de publicação:Brazil
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The goal of this study was to compare the visual contrast sensitivity (CS) of men and women exposed and not exposed to organic solvents. Forty-six volunteers of both genders aged between 18 and 41 years (mean±SD=27.72±6.28) participated. Gas station attendants were exposed to gas containing 46.30 ppm of solvents at a temperature of 304±274.39 K, humidity of 62.25±7.59% and ventilation of 0.69±0.46 m/s (a passive gas chromatography-based sampling method was used considering the microclimate variables). Visual CS was measured via the psychophysical method of two-alternative forced choice using vertical sinusoidal gratings with spatial frequencies of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, 10.0, and 16.0 cpd (cycles per degree) and an average luminance of 34.4 cd/m2. The results showed that visual CS was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the following groups: i) exposed men compared to unexposed men at frequencies of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 cpd; ii) exposed women compared to unexposed women at a frequency of 5.0 cpd; and iii) exposed women compared to exposed men at a frequency of 0.5 cpd, even at exposures below the tolerance limit (300 ppm). These results suggest that the visual CS of exposed men was impaired over a wider range of spatial frequencies than that of exposed women. This difference may have been due to the higher body fat content of women compared to that of men, suggesting that body fat in women can serve as a protective factor against neurotoxic effects.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Sensibilidades de Contraste/efeitos dos fármacos
Exposição Ocupacional/efeitos adversos
Solventes/efeitos adversos
Percepção Visual/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Tecido Adiposo/anatomia & histologia
Adolescente
Adulto
Brasil/epidemiologia
Escolaridade
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Microclima
Exposição Ocupacional/estatística & dados numéricos
Limiar Sensorial/fisiologia
Fatores Sexuais
Aprendizagem Espacial/fisiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Solvents)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180301
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180301
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180118
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28469014
[Au] Autor:Dong YW; Li XX; Choi FMP; Williams GA; Somero GN; Helmuth B
[Ad] Endereço:State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, College of Ocean and Earth Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, People's Republic of China dongyw@xmu.edu.cn.
[Ti] Título:Untangling the roles of microclimate, behaviour and physiological polymorphism in governing vulnerability of intertidal snails to heat stress.
[So] Source:Proc Biol Sci;284(1854), 2017 May 17.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2954
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Biogeographic distributions are driven by cumulative effects of smaller scale processes. Thus, vulnerability of animals to thermal stress is the result of physiological sensitivities to body temperature ( ), microclimatic conditions, and behavioural thermoregulation. To understand interactions among these variables, we analysed the thermal tolerances of three species of intertidal snails from different latitudes along the Chinese coast, and estimated potential in different microhabitats at each site. We then empirically determined the temperatures at which heart rate decreased sharply with rising temperature (Arrhenius breakpoint temperature, ABT) and at which it fell to zero (flat line temperature, FLT) to calculate thermal safety margins (TSM). Regular exceedance of FLT in sun-exposed microhabitats, a lethal effect, was predicted for only one mid-latitude site. However, ABTs of some individuals were exceeded at sun-exposed microhabitats in most sites, suggesting physiological impairment for snails with poor behavioural thermoregulation and revealing inter-individual variations (physiological polymorphism) of thermal limits. An autocorrelation analysis of showed that predictability of extreme temperatures was lowest at the hottest sites, indicating that the effectiveness of behavioural thermoregulation is potentially lowest at these sites. These results illustrate the critical roles of mechanistic studies at small spatial scales when predicting effects of climate change.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Temperatura Alta
Microclima
Caramujos/fisiologia
Estresse Fisiológico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Mudança Climática
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180131
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180131
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  3 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28972981
[Au] Autor:Leandro-Muñoz ME; Tixier P; Germon A; Rakotobe V; Phillips-Mora W; Maximova S; Avelino J
[Ad] Endereço:Agroforestry and Sustainable Agriculture Department, Division of Research and Development, Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center, Turrialba, Cartago, Costa Rica.
[Ti] Título:Effects of microclimatic variables on the symptoms and signs onset of Moniliophthora roreri, causal agent of Moniliophthora pod rot in cacao.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0184638, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Moniliophthora Pod Rot (MPR) caused by the fungus Moniliophthora roreri (Cif.) Evans et al., is one of the main limiting factors of cocoa production in Latin America. Currently insufficient information on the biology and epidemiology of the pathogen limits the development of efficient management options to control MPR. This research aims to elucidate MPR development through the following daily microclimatic variables: minimum and maximum temperatures, wetness frequency, average temperature and relative humidity in the highly susceptible cacao clone Pound-7 (incidence = 86% 2008-2013 average). A total of 55 cohorts totaling 2,268 pods of 3-10 cm length, one to two months of age, were tagged weekly. Pods were assessed throughout their lifetime, every one or two weeks, and classified in 3 different categories: healthy, diseased with no sporulation, diseased with sporulating lesions. As a first step, we used Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) to determine with no a priori the period (when and for how long) each climatic variable was better related with the appearance of symptoms and sporulation. Then the significance of the candidate variables was tested in a complete GLMM. Daily average wetness frequency from day 14 to day 1, before tagging, and daily average maximum temperature from day 4 to day 21, after tagging, were the most explanatory variables of the symptoms appearance. The former was positively linked with the symptoms appearance when the latter exhibited a maximum at 30°C. The most important variables influencing sporulation were daily average minimum temperature from day 35 to day 58 and daily average maximum temperature from day 37 to day 48, both after tagging. Minimum temperature was negatively linked with the sporulation while maximum temperature was positively linked. Results indicated that the fungal microclimatic requirements vary from the early to the late cycle stages, possibly due to the pathogen's long latent period. This information is valuable for development of new conceptual models for MPR and improvement of control methods.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Agaricales/patogenicidade
Cacau/microbiologia
Microclima
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171031
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171031
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171004
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184638


  4 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28880883
[Au] Autor:Mauree D; Coccolo S; Kaempf J; Scartezzini JL
[Ad] Endereço:Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory. Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.
[Ti] Título:Multi-scale modelling to evaluate building energy consumption at the neighbourhood scale.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0183437, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:A new methodology is proposed to couple a meteorological model with a building energy use model. The aim of such a coupling is to improve the boundary conditions of both models with no significant increase in computational time. In the present case, the Canopy Interface Model (CIM) is coupled with CitySim. CitySim provides the geometrical characteristics to CIM, which then calculates a high resolution profile of the meteorological variables. These are in turn used by CitySim to calculate the energy flows in an urban district. We have conducted a series of experiments on the EPFL campus in Lausanne, Switzerland, to show the effectiveness of the coupling strategy. First, measured data from the campus for the year 2015 are used to force CIM and to evaluate its aptitude to reproduce high resolution vertical profiles. Second, we compare the use of local climatic data and data from a meteorological station located outside the urban area, in an evaluation of energy use. In both experiments, we demonstrate the importance of using in building energy software, meteorological variables that account for the urban microclimate. Furthermore, we also show that some building and urban forms are more sensitive to the local environment.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Monitoramento Ambiental/métodos
Modelos Teóricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Meteorologia
Microclima
Software
Suíça
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171016
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171016
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170908
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0183437


  5 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28806772
[Au] Autor:Keppel G; Anderson S; Williams C; Kleindorfer S; O'Connell C
[Ad] Endereço:School of Natural and Built Environments and Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Microhabitats and canopy cover moderate high summer temperatures in a fragmented Mediterranean landscape.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(8):e0183106, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Extreme heat events will become more frequent under anthropogenic climate change, especially in Mediterranean ecosystems. Microhabitats can considerably moderate (buffer) the effects of extreme weather events and hence facilitate the persistence of some components of the biodiversity. We investigate the microclimatic moderation provided by two important microhabitats (cavities formed by the leaves of the grass-tree Xanthorrhoea semiplana F.Muell., Xanthorrhoeaceae; and inside the leaf-litter) during the summer of 2015/16 on the Fleurieu Peninsula of South Australia. We placed microsensors inside and outside these microhabitats, as well as above the ground below the forest canopy. Grass-tree and leaf-litter microhabitats significantly buffered against high temperatures and low relative humidity, compared to ground-below-canopy sensors. There was no significant difference between grass-tree and leaf-litter temperatures: in both microhabitats, daily temperature variation was reduced, day temperatures were 1-5°C cooler, night temperatures were 0.5-3°C warmer, and maximum temperatures were up to 14.4°C lower, compared to ground-below-canopy sensors. Grass-tree and leaf-litter microhabitats moderated heat increase at an average rate of 0.24°C temperature per 1°C increase of ambient temperature in the ground-below-canopy microhabitat. The average daily variation in temperature was determined by the type (grass-tree and leaf-litter versus ground-below-canopy) of microhabitat (explaining 67%), the amount of canopy cover and the area of the vegetation fragment (together explaining almost 10% of the variation). Greater canopy cover increased the amount of microclimatic moderation provided, especially in the leaf-litter. Our study highlights the importance of microhabitats in moderating macroclimatic conditions. However, this moderating effect is currently not considered in species distribution modelling under anthropogenic climate change nor in the management of vegetation. This shortcoming will have to be addressed to obtain realistic forecasts of future species distributions and to achieve effective management of biodiversity.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ecossistema
Microclima
Estações do Ano
Temperatura Ambiente
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Geografia
Umidade
Modelos Lineares
Região do Mediterrâneo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171009
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171009
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170815
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0183106


  6 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28558030
[Au] Autor:Murdock CC; Evans MV; McClanahan TD; Miazgowicz KL; Tesla B
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Fine-scale variation in microclimate across an urban landscape shapes variation in mosquito population dynamics and the potential of Aedes albopictus to transmit arboviral disease.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;11(5):e0005640, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Most statistical and mechanistic models used to predict mosquito-borne disease transmission incorporate climate drivers of disease transmission by utilizing environmental data collected at geographic scales that are potentially coarser than what mosquito populations may actually experience. Temperature and relative humidity can vary greatly between indoor and outdoor environments, and can be influenced strongly by variation in landscape features. In the Aedes albopictus system, we conducted a proof-of-concept study in the vicinity of the University of Georgia to explore the effects of fine-scale microclimate variation on mosquito life history and vectorial capacity (VC). We placed Ae. albopictus larvae in artificial pots distributed across three replicate sites within three different land uses-urban, suburban, and rural, which were characterized by high, intermediate, and low proportions of impervious surfaces. Data loggers were placed into each larval environment and in nearby vegetation to record daily variation in water and ambient temperature and relative humidity. The number of adults emerging from each pot and their body size and sex were recorded daily. We found mosquito microclimate to significantly vary across the season as well as with land use. Urban sites were in general warmer and less humid than suburban and rural sites, translating into decreased larval survival, smaller body sizes, and lower per capita growth rates of mosquitoes on urban sites. Dengue transmission potential was predicted to be higher in the summer than the fall. Additionally, the effects of land use on dengue transmission potential varied by season. Warm summers resulted in a higher predicted VC on the cooler, rural sites, while warmer, urban sites had a higher predicted VC during the cooler fall season.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aedes/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Vírus da Dengue/isolamento & purificação
Dengue/transmissão
Insetos Vetores/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Microclima
Estações do Ano
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Aedes/virologia
Animais
Dengue/epidemiologia
Feminino
Georgia
Insetos Vetores/virologia
Larva/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Masculino
Dinâmica Populacional
Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais
Temperatura Ambiente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170720
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170720
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170531
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005640


  7 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28486538
[Au] Autor:Kim TN
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:How plant neighborhood composition influences herbivory: Testing four mechanisms of associational resistance and susceptibility.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(5):e0176499, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Neighboring plants can decrease or increase each other's likelihood of damage from herbivores through associational resistance or susceptibility, respectively. Associational effects (AE) can transpire through changes in herbivore or plant traits that affect herbivore movement, densities, and feeding behaviors to ultimately affect plant damage. While much work has focused on understanding the mechanisms that underlie associational effects, we know little about how these mechanisms are influenced by neighborhood composition, i.e., plant density or relative frequency which is necessary to make predictions about when AE should occur in nature. Using a series of field and greenhouse experiments, I examined how plant density and relative frequency affected plant damage to Solanum carolinense and four mechanisms that underlie AE; (i) accumulation of insect herbivores and arthropod predators, (ii) microclimate conditions, (iii) plant resistance, and (iv) specialist herbivore preference. I found a positive relationship between S. carolinense damage and the relative frequency of a non-focal neighbor (Solidago altissima) and all four AE mechanisms were influenced by one or multiple neighborhood components. Frequency-dependence in S. carolinense damage is most likely due to greater generalist herbivore load on S. carolinense (through spillover from S. altissima) with microclimate variables, herbivore preference, predation pressures, and plant resistance having relatively weaker effects. Associational effects may have long-term consequences for these two plant species during plant succession and understanding context-dependent herbivory has insect pest management implication for other plant species in agriculture and forestry.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Suscetibilidade a Doenças
Herbivoria
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Artrópodes/fisiologia
Microclima
Solanum
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170915
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170915
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170510
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0176499


  8 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28399209
[Au] Autor:Mandal R; Das P; Kumar V; Kesari S
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Vector Biology and Control, Rajendra Memorial Research Institute of Medical Sciences (ICMR), Agamkuan, Patna 800 007, Bihar, India.
[Ti] Título:Spatial Distribution of Phlebotomus argentipes (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Eastern India, a Case Study Evaluating Multispatial Resolution Remotely Sensed Environmental Evidence and Microclimatic Data.
[So] Source:J Med Entomol;54(4):844-853, 2017 Jul 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2928
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Remote sensing, a powerful tool for analyzing landscape factors, is being used to explore the spatial ecology of vectors of several diseases. This study aims to explore the role of buffer size in identification and quantification of geo-environmental factors from multispatial resolution satellite data and its application along with microclimatic data to kala-azar vector abundance modeling.Sand fly abundance and microclimatic data were collected from 210 sample sites during the premonsoon and postmonsoon season of 2014 from Muzaffarpur district of Bihar (India). Linear imaging self-scanning sensor (LISS-III; 23.5 m) and advanced wide field sensor (AWiFS; 56 m) imageries were used for generating environmental variables at 300- and 500-m buffer zones. Four analytical models of sand fly density were developed and evaluated for predictive accuracy.A total of 33 geo-environmental and four microclimatic variables were tested for the prediction of sand fly density, of which the best four were maximum temperature, relative humidity, Euclidean nearest-neighbor distance of settlement area to mixed bush-grass land, and surface water body. Predictive accuracy of the LISS-III models was found to be higher than AWiFS models at all buffer sizes.The results show that geo-environmental parameters and microclimatic data are the best predictors for sand fly density modeling. Buffer sizes play an important role in identifying the explanatory variables. Model parameters may be useful in identifying predisposing factors of sand fly habitat suitability at the micro level.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Distribuição Animal
Microclima
Phlebotomus/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Índia
Densidade Demográfica
Tecnologia de Sensoriamento Remoto
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171013
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171013
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170412
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jme/tjw232


  9 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28271176
[Au] Autor:Rahman IU; Khan N; Ali K
[Ad] Endereço:Laboratory of Plant Ecology, Department of Botany, University of Malakand, Chakdara, LowerDir, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. irbotanist@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Título:Classification and ordination of understory vegetation using multivariate techniques in the Pinus wallichiana forests of Swat Valley, northern Pakistan.
[So] Source:Naturwissenschaften;104(3-4):24, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1904
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:An understory vegetation survey of the Pinus wallichiana-dominated temperate forests of Swat District was carried out to inspect the structure, composition and ecological associations of the forest vegetation. A quadrat method of sampling was used to record the floristic and phytosociological data necessary for the analysis using 300 quadrats of 10 × 10 m each. Some vegetation parameters viz. frequency and density for trees (overstory vegetation) as well as for the understory vegetation were recorded. The results revealed that in total, 92 species belonging to 77 different genera and 45 families existed in the area. The largest families were Asteraceae, Rosaceae and Lamiaceae with 12, ten and nine species, respectively. Ward's agglomerative cluster analysis for tree species resulted in three floristically and ecologically distinct community types along different topographic and soil variables. Importance value indices (IVI) were also calculated for understory vegetation and were subjected to ordination techniques, i.e. canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA). DCA bi-plots for stands show that most of the stands were scattered around the centre of the DCA bi-plot, identified by two slightly scattered clusters. DCA for species bi-plot clearly identified three clusters of species revealing three types of understory communities in the study area. Results of the CCA were somewhat different from the DCA showing the impact of environmental variables on the understory species. CCA results reveal that three environmental variables, i.e. altitude, slope and P (mg/kg), have a strong influence on distribution of stands and species. Impact of tree species on the understory vegetation was also tested by CCA which showed that four tree species, i.e. P. wallichiana A.B. Jackson, Juglans regia Linn., Quercus dilatata Lindl. ex Royle and Cedrus deodara (Roxb. ex Lamb.) G. Don, have strong influences on associated understory vegetation. It is therefore concluded that Swat District has various microclimatic zones with suitable environmental variables to support distinct flora.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Biodiversidade
Botânica/métodos
Monitoramento Ambiental/métodos
Florestas
Plantas/classificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Altitude
Ecossistema
Microclima
Análise Multivariada
Paquistão
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170916
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170916
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170309
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00114-017-1431-2


  10 / 1892 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28264051
[Au] Autor:Thapa S; Stewart BA; Xue Q; Chen Y
[Ad] Endereço:Dryland Agriculture Institute, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Manipulating plant geometry to improve microclimate, grain yield, and harvest index in grain sorghum.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(3):e0173511, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Cultivar selection, planting geometry, and plant population are the key factors determining grain sorghum yields in water deficit areas. The objective of this study was to investigate whether clump geometry (three plants clustered) improves microclimate within crop canopy when plants are grown under varying water levels. In a 2-yr sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) greenhouse study, plants were grown at two geometries (clump and conventional evenly spaced planting, ESP), two water levels (high and low, representing well-watered and water-limited condition, respectively), and three soil surface treatments (lid covered, straw-mulched, and bare). Air temperature and relative humidity (RH) within the plant canopy were measured every five minutes at different growth stages. Mean vapor pressure deficits (VPDs) within the clumps were consistently lower than those for ESPs, indicating that clumps improved the microclimate. Clumps had significantly higher harvest index (HI) compared to ESPs (0.48 vs. 0.43), which was largely due to clumps having an average of 0.4 tillers per plant compared to 1.2 tillers per plant for ESPs. Grain yield in the current study was similar between clumps and ESPs. However, our results suggest that improved microclimate was likely a reason for clumps producing significantly higher grain yields compared to ESPs in previous studies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Produtos Agrícolas
Grãos Comestíveis
Microclima
Sorghum
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Biomassa
Sorghum/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Água
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
059QF0KO0R (Water)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170825
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170825
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170307
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0173511



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