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Pesquisa : G16.500.275.157.130 [Categoria DeCS]
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  1 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29385204
[Au] Autor:Mayfield AB; Chen YJ; Lu CY; Chen CS
[Ad] Endereço:Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation, Annapolis, MD, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:The proteomic response of the reef coral Pocillopora acuta to experimentally elevated temperatures.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0192001, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Although most reef-building corals live near the upper threshold of their thermotolerance, some scleractinians are resilient to temperature increases. For instance, Pocillopora acuta specimens from an upwelling habitat in Southern Taiwan survived a nine-month experimental exposure to 30°C, a temperature hypothesized to induce stress. To gain a greater understanding of the molecular pathways underlying such high-temperature acclimation, the protein profiles of experimental controls incubated at 27°C were compared to those of conspecific P. acuta specimens exposed to 30°C for two, four, or eight weeks, and differentially concentrated proteins (DCPs) were removed from the gels and sequenced with mass spectrometry. Sixty unique DCPs were uncovered across both eukaryotic compartments of the P. acuta-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium) mutualism, and Symbiodinium were more responsive to high temperature at the protein-level than the coral hosts in which they resided at the two-week sampling time. Furthermore, proteins involved in the stress response were more likely to be documented at different cellular concentrations across temperature treatments in Symbiodinium, whereas the temperature-sensitive host coral proteome featured numerous proteins involved in cytoskeletal structure, immunity, and metabolism. These proteome-scale data suggest that the coral host and its intracellular dinoflagellates have differing strategies for acclimating to elevated temperatures.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Recifes de Corais
Proteômica
Temperatura Ambiente
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Eletroforese em Gel Bidimensional
Espectrometria de Massas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192001


  2 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29351566
[Au] Autor:Samoilys M; Roche R; Koldewey H; Turner J
[Ad] Endereço:CORDIO East Africa, Mombasa, Kenya.
[Ti] Título:Patterns in reef fish assemblages: Insights from the Chagos Archipelago.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191448, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Understanding the drivers of variability in the composition of fish assemblages across the Indo-Pacific region is crucial to support coral reef ecosystem resilience. Whilst numerous relationships and feedback mechanisms between the functional roles of coral reef fishes and reef benthic composition have been investigated, certain key groups, such as the herbivores, are widely suggested to maintain reefs in a coral-dominated state. Examining links between fishes and reef benthos is complicated by the interactions between natural processes, disturbance events and anthropogenic impacts, particularly fishing pressure. This study examined fish assemblages and associated benthic variables across five atolls within the Chagos Archipelago, where fishing pressure is largely absent, to better understand these relationships. We found high variability in fish assemblages among atolls and sites across the archipelago, especially for key groups such as a suite of grazer-detritivore surgeonfish, and the parrotfishes which varied in density over 40-fold between sites. Differences in fish assemblages were significantly associated with variable levels of both live and recently dead coral cover and rugosity. We suggest these results reflect differing coral recovery trajectories following coral bleaching events and a strong influence of 'bottom-up' control mechanisms on fish assemblages. Species level analyses revealed that Scarus niger, Acanthurus nigrofuscus and Chlorurus strongylocephalos were key species driving differences in fish assemblage structure. Clarifying the trophic roles of herbivorous and detritivorous reef fishes will require species-level studies, which also examine feeding behaviour, to fully understand their contribution in maintaining reef resilience to climate change and fishing impacts.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Recifes de Corais
Peixes
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antozoários
Biodiversidade
Biomassa
Mudança Climática
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Comportamento Alimentar
Pesqueiros
Peixes/classificação
Peixes/fisiologia
Herbivoria
Oceano Índico
Ilhas do Oceano Índico
Densidade Demográfica
Especificidade da Espécie
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191448


  3 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29206219
[Au] Autor:Heenan A; Williams ID; Acoba T; DesRochers A; Kosaki RK; Kanemura T; Nadon MO; Brainard RE
[Ad] Endereço:Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.
[Ti] Título:Long-term monitoring of coral reef fish assemblages in the Western central pacific.
[So] Source:Sci Data;4:170176, 2017 12 05.
[Is] ISSN:2052-4463
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Throughout the tropics, coral reef ecosystems, which are critically important to people, have been greatly altered by humans. Differentiating human impacts from natural drivers of ecosystem state is essential to effective management. Here we present a dataset from a large-scale monitoring program that surveys coral reef fish assemblages and habitats encompassing the bulk of the US-affiliated tropical Pacific, and spanning wide gradients in both natural drivers and human impact. Currently, this includes >5,500 surveys from 39 islands and atolls in Hawaii (including the main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands) and affiliated geo-political regions of American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the Pacific Remote Islands Areas. The dataset spans 2010-2017, during which time, each region was visited at least every three years, and ~500-1,000 surveys performed annually. This standardised dataset is a powerful resource that can be used to understand how human, environmental and oceanographic conditions influence coral reef fish community structure and function, providing a basis for research to support effective management outcomes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Recifes de Corais
Peixes
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ecossistema
Monitoramento Ambiental
Oceano Pacífico
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:DATASET; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/sdata.2017.176


  4 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29315312
[Au] Autor:Cyronak T; Andersson AJ; Langdon C; Albright R; Bates NR; Caldeira K; Carlton R; Corredor JE; Dunbar RB; Enochs I; Erez J; Eyre BD; Gattuso JP; Gledhill D; Kayanne H; Kline DI; Koweek DA; Lantz C; Lazar B; Manzello D; McMahon A; Meléndez M; Page HN; Santos IR; Schulz KG; Shaw E; Silverman J; Suzuki A; Teneva L; Watanabe A; Yamamoto S
[Ad] Endereço:Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Taking the metabolic pulse of the world's coral reefs.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190872, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Worldwide, coral reef ecosystems are experiencing increasing pressure from a variety of anthropogenic perturbations including ocean warming and acidification, increased sedimentation, eutrophication, and overfishing, which could shift reefs to a condition of net calcium carbonate (CaCO3) dissolution and erosion. Herein, we determine the net calcification potential and the relative balance of net organic carbon metabolism (net community production; NCP) and net inorganic carbon metabolism (net community calcification; NCC) within 23 coral reef locations across the globe. In light of these results, we consider the suitability of using these two metrics developed from total alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measurements collected on different spatiotemporal scales to monitor coral reef biogeochemistry under anthropogenic change. All reefs in this study were net calcifying for the majority of observations as inferred from alkalinity depletion relative to offshore, although occasional observations of net dissolution occurred at most locations. However, reefs with lower net calcification potential (i.e., lower TA depletion) could shift towards net dissolution sooner than reefs with a higher potential. The percent influence of organic carbon fluxes on total changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (i.e., NCP compared to the sum of NCP and NCC) ranged from 32% to 88% and reflected inherent biogeochemical differences between reefs. Reefs with the largest relative percentage of NCP experienced the largest variability in seawater pH for a given change in DIC, which is directly related to the reefs ability to elevate or suppress local pH relative to the open ocean. This work highlights the value of measuring coral reef carbonate chemistry when evaluating their susceptibility to ongoing global environmental change and offers a baseline from which to guide future conservation efforts aimed at preserving these valuable ecosystems.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Recifes de Corais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Ácidos/análise
Carbono/análise
Ecossistema
Eutrofização
Aquecimento Global
Concentração de Íons de Hidrogênio
Água do Mar/química
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Acids); 7440-44-0 (Carbon)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180110
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190872


  5 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28464391
[Au] Autor:Lawrence SA; Floge SA; Davy JE; Davy SK; Wilson WH
[Ad] Endereço:School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, 6140, New Zealand.
[Ti] Título:Exploratory analysis of Symbiodinium transcriptomes reveals potential latent infection by large dsDNA viruses.
[So] Source:Environ Microbiol;19(10):3909-3919, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1462-2920
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Coral reefs are in decline worldwide. Much of this decline is attributable to mass coral bleaching events and disease outbreaks, both of which are linked to anthropogenic climate change. Despite increased research effort, much remains unknown about these phenomena, especially the causative agents of many coral diseases. In particular, coral-associated viruses have received little attention, and their potential roles in coral diseases are largely unknown. Previous microscopy studies have produced evidence of viral infections in Symbiodinium, the endosymbiotic algae critical for coral survival, and more recently molecular evidence of Symbiodinium-infecting viruses has emerged from metagenomic studies of corals. Here, we took an exploratory whole-transcriptome approach to virus gene discovery in three different Symbiodinium cultures. An array of virus-like genes was found in each of the transcriptomes, with the majority apparently belonging to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses. Upregulation of virus-like gene expression following stress experiments indicated that Symbiodinium cells may host latent or persistent viral infections that are induced via stress. This was supported by analysis of host gene expression, which showed changes consistent with viral infection after exposure to stress. If these results can be replicated in Symbiodinium cells in hospite, they could help to explain the breakdown of the coral-Symbiodinium symbiosis, and possibly some of the numerous coral diseases that have yet to be assigned a causative agent.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Vírus de DNA/genética
Dinoflagelados/genética
Dinoflagelados/virologia
Transcriptoma/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Antozoários/fisiologia
Mudança Climática
Recifes de Corais
Simbiose/genética
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/1462-2920.13782


  6 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29346442
[Au] Autor:Lewis LS; Smith JE; Eynaud Y
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Comparative metabolic ecology of tropical herbivorous echinoids on a coral reef.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190470, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The metabolic rate of consumers is a key driver of ecosystem dynamics. On coral reefs, herbivorous echinoids consume fleshy algae, facilitating the growth of reef-building calcified organisms; however, little is known about differences among species in their metabolic and functional ecology. Here, we used log-linear (log-log) regression models to examine the allometric scaling of mass and routine metabolic rate for five common herbivorous echinoids on a Hawaiian coral reef: Echinothrix calamaris, E. diadema, Echinometra matthaei, Heterocentrotus mammillatus, and Tripneustes gratilla. Scaling relationships were then contrasted with empirical observations of echinoid ecology and general metabolic theory to broaden our understanding of diversity in the metabolic and functional ecology of tropical herbivorous echinoids. RESULTS: Test diameter and species explained 98% of the variation in mass, and mass and species explained 92.4% and 87.5% of the variation in individual (I) and mass-specific (B) metabolic rates, respectively. Scaling exponents did not differ for mass or metabolism; however, normalizing constants differed significantly among species. Mass varied as the cube of test diameter (b = 2.9), with HM exhibiting a significantly higher normalizing constant than other species, likely due to its heavily-calcified spines and skeleton. Individual metabolic rate varied approximately as the 2/5 power of mass (γ = 0.44); significantly smaller than the 3/4 universal scaling coefficient, but inclusive of 2/3 scaling. E. calamaris and H. mammillatus exhibited the lowest normalizing constants, corresponding with their slow-moving, cryptic, rock-boring life-history. In contrast, E. calamaris, E. diadema, and T. gratilla, exhibited higher metabolic rates, likely reflecting their higher levels of activity and ability to freely browse for preferred algae due to chemical anti-predator defenses. Thus, differences in metabolic scaling appeared to correspond with differences in phylogeny, behavior, and ecological function. Such comparative metabolic assessments are central to informing theory, ecological models, and the effective management of ecosystems.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Recifes de Corais
Ecossistema
Herbivoria
Ouriços-do-Mar/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Ouriços-do-Mar/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180215
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180215
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190470


  7 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29324887
[Au] Autor:Irigoyen AJ; Rojo I; Calò A; Trobbiani G; Sánchez-Carnero N; García-Charton JA
[Ad] Endereço:Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos (CESIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CCT CENPAT-CONICET). Boulevard Brown, Puerto Madryn, Chubut, Argentina.
[Ti] Título:The "Tracked Roaming Transect" and distance sampling methods increase the efficiency of underwater visual censuses.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190990, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Underwater visual census (UVC) is the most common approach for estimating diversity, abundance and size of reef fishes in shallow and clear waters. Abundance estimation through UVC is particularly problematic in species occurring at low densities and/or highly aggregated because of their high variability at both spatial and temporal scales. The statistical power of experiments involving UVC techniques may be increased by augmenting the number of replicates or the area surveyed. In this work we present and test the efficiency of an UVC method based on diver towed GPS, the Tracked Roaming Transect (TRT), designed to maximize transect length (and thus the surveyed area) with respect to diving time invested in monitoring, as compared to Conventional Strip Transects (CST). Additionally, we analyze the effect of increasing transect width and length on the precision of density estimates by comparing TRT vs. CST methods using different fixed widths of 6 and 20 m (FW3 and FW10, respectively) and the Distance Sampling (DS) method, in which perpendicular distance of each fish or group of fishes to the transect line is estimated by divers up to 20 m from the transect line. The TRT was 74% more time and cost efficient than the CST (all transect widths considered together) and, for a given time, the use of TRT and/or increasing the transect width increased the precision of density estimates. In addition, since with the DS method distances of fishes to the transect line have to be estimated, and not measured directly as in terrestrial environments, errors in estimations of perpendicular distances can seriously affect DS density estimations. To assess the occurrence of distance estimation errors and their dependence on the observer's experience, a field experiment using wooden fish models was performed. We tested the precision and accuracy of density estimators based on fixed widths and the DS method. The accuracy of the estimates was measured comparing the actual total abundance with those estimated by divers using FW3, FW10, and DS estimators. Density estimates differed by 13% (range 0.1-31%) from the actual values (average = 13.09%; median = 14.16%). Based on our results we encourage the use of the Tracked Roaming Transect with Distance Sampling (TRT+DS) method for improving density estimates of species occurring at low densities and/or highly aggregated, as well as for exploratory rapid-assessment surveys in which divers could gather spatial ecological and ecosystem information on large areas during UVC.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Monitoramento Ambiental/métodos
Peixes
Visão Ocular
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Biodiversidade
Recifes de Corais
Monitoramento Ambiental/instrumentação
Peixes/classificação
Sistemas de Informação Geográfica
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180215
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180215
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190990


  8 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29021096
[Au] Autor:Zhang R; Zhang R; Yu K; Wang Y; Huang X; Pei J; Wei C; Pan Z; Qin Z; Zhang G
[Ad] Endereço:Guangxi Laboratory on the Study of Coral Reefs in the South China Sea, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China; Coral Reef Research Center of China, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China; School of Marine Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China.
[Ti] Título:Occurrence, sources and transport of antibiotics in the surface water of coral reef regions in the South China Sea: Potential risk to coral growth.
[So] Source:Environ Pollut;232:450-457, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6424
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Laboratory research has indicated that antibiotics had negative effects on coral growth by disturbing natural microbiota; however, no field studies have reported antibiotic contamination levels and their influence on coral growth in natural coral reef regions (CRRs). This study investigated antibiotic occurrence and sources in the surface water from CRRs that have suffered from rapid coral degradation and evaluated their risk to coral growth. These regions are in the South China Sea, including four coastal and two offshore CRRs. The results show that 13 antibiotics were detected in the coastal CRRs with concentrations ranging from 10 -10 ng L , while 5 antibiotics occurred in offshore CRRs (300-950 km from the mainland), with concentrations ranging from 10 to 10 ng L . Their concentrations decreased gradually from the coast to offshore in the transport process. However, Yongxing Island, which is approximately 300 km from the mainland, was an exception with relatively higher concentrations than the surrounding reefs because of the ever-increasing human activity on the island. The presence of anthropogenic contaminants antibiotics in CRRs may be a potential risk to coral growth.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Antozoários/fisiologia
Antibacterianos/análise
Recifes de Corais
Monitoramento Ambiental
Água do Mar/química
Poluentes Químicos da Água/análise
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
China
Atividades Humanas
Seres Humanos
Risco
Medição de Risco
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180123
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180123
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171013
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28464532
[Au] Autor:Sogin EM; Putnam HM; Nelson CE; Anderson P; Gates RD
[Ad] Endereço:Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Kane'ohe, HI, USA.
[Ti] Título:Correspondence of coral holobiont metabolome with symbiotic bacteria, archaea and Symbiodinium communities.
[So] Source:Environ Microbiol Rep;9(3):310-315, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1758-2229
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Microbial symbiotic partners, such as those associated with Scleractinian corals, mediate biochemical transformations that influence host performance and survival. While evidence suggests microbial community composition partly accounts for differences in coral physiology, how these symbionts affect metabolic pathways remains underexplored. We aimed to assess functional implications of variation among coral-associated microbial partners in hospite. To this end, we characterized and compared metabolomic profiles and microbial community composition from nine reef-building coral species. These data demonstrate metabolite profiles and microbial communities are species-specific and are correlated to one another. Using Porites spp. as a case study, we present evidence that the relative abundance of different sub-clades of Symbiodinium and bacterial/archaeal families are linked to positive and negative metabolomic signatures. Our data suggest that while some microbial partners benefit the union, others are more opportunistic with potential detriment to the host. Consequently, coral partner choice likely influences cellular metabolic activities and, therefore, holobiont nutrition.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Alveolados/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Antozoários/microbiologia
Antozoários/parasitologia
Archaea/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Gammaproteobacteria/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Simbiose/fisiologia
Vibrionaceae/crescimento & desenvolvimento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Alveolados/metabolismo
Animais
Archaea/classificação
Archaea/metabolismo
Biodiversidade
Recifes de Corais
Gammaproteobacteria/metabolismo
Metaboloma/fisiologia
Vibrionaceae/metabolismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/1758-2229.12541


  10 / 1920 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29210241
[Au] Autor:Yeager LA; Stoner EW; Zapata MJ; Layman CA
[Ti] Título:Does landscape context mediate the nature of density dependence for a coral reef fish?
[So] Source:Ecol Appl;24(7):1833-41, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1051-0761
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Over-harvest and landscape change are two of the greatest threats to marine ecosystems. Over-harvest may directly affect key population regulation mechanisms (e.g., density dependence), with the magnitude of the effects being further influenced by changes in landscape structure and associated resource availability. Because resource availability and conspecific density often co-vary within the natural landscape, manipulative experiments are needed to understand how changes in these two drivers may affect density dependence in wild populations. We used a common, shoaling, coral reef fish (white grunt, Haemulon plumierii) as our model species, and manipulated fish densities and landscape context of artificial reef habitats to assess the effects of each on fish condition. We found evidence of inverse density dependence, where individual condition was positively related to conspecific density; landscape context had little effect. Mean grunt condition on natural patch reefs was similar to that for our low grunt density treatment artificial reefs, possibly due to differences in fish densities or landscape context. These findings suggest that over-harvest may have detrimental effects on wild populations that extend beyond mere reductions in population size, especially for group-living species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conservação dos Recursos Naturais
Recifes de Corais
Peixes/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Monitoramento Ambiental
Pesqueiros
Densidade Demográfica
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180108
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180108
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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