Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : G16.500.750.775.271 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 211 [refinar]
Mostrando: 1 .. 10   no formato [Detalhado]

página 1 de 22 ir para página                         

  1 / 211 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28934724
[Au] Autor:Sheehan MC; Fox MA; Kaye C; Resnick B
[Ad] Endereço:Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
[Ti] Título:Integrating Health into Local Climate Response: Lessons from the U.S. CDC Climate-Ready States and Cities Initiative.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;125(9):094501, 2017 Sep 20.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:SUMMARY: Public health has potential to serve as a frame to convey the urgency of behavior change needed to adapt to a changing climate and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Local governments form the backbone of climate-related public health preparedness. Yet local health agencies are often inadequately prepared and poorly integrated into climate change assessments and plans. We reviewed the climate health profiles of 16 states and two cities participating in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s Climate-Ready States and Cities Initiative (CRSCI) that aims to build local capacity to assess and respond to the health impacts of climate change. Following recommendations from a recent expert panel strategic review, we present illustrations of emerging promising practice and future directions. We found that CRSCI has strengthened climate preparedness and response in local public health agencies by identifying critical climate-health impacts and vulnerable populations, and has helped integrate health more fully into broader climate planning. Promising practice was found in all three recommendation areas identified by the expert panel (leveraging partnerships, refining assessment methodologies and enhancing communications), particularly with regard to health impacts of extreme heat. Vast needs remain, however, suggesting the need to disseminate CRSCI experience to non-grantees. In conclusion, the CRSCI program approach and selected activities illustrate a way forward toward robust, targeted local preparedness and response that may serve as a useful example for public health departments in the United States and internationally, particularly at a time of uncertain commitment to climate change agreements at the national level. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1838.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Mudança Climática
Exposição Ambiental/estatística & dados numéricos
Saúde Pública/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Cidades/epidemiologia
Cidades/estatística & dados numéricos
Calor Extremo
Seres Humanos
Governo Local
Saúde Pública/tendências
Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171020
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171020
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170922
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1289/EHP1838


  2 / 211 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28886602
[Au] Autor:Guo Y; Gasparrini A; Armstrong BG; Tawatsupa B; Tobias A; Lavigne E; Coelho MSZS; Pan X; Kim H; Hashizume M; Honda Y; Guo YL; Wu CF; Zanobetti A; Schwartz JD; Bell ML; Scortichini M; Michelozzi P; Punnasiri K; Li S; Tian L; Garcia SDO; Seposo X; Overcenco A; Zeka A; Goodman P; Dang TN; Dung DV; Mayvaneh F; Saldiva PHN; Williams G; Tong S
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, The University of Queensland , Brisbane, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Heat Wave and Mortality: A Multicountry, Multicommunity Study.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;125(8):087006, 2017 Aug 10.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined variation in the associations between heat waves and mortality in an international context. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to systematically examine the impacts of heat waves on mortality with lag effects internationally. METHODS: We collected daily data of temperature and mortality from 400 communities in 18 countries/regions and defined 12 types of heat waves by combining community-specific daily mean temperature ≥90th, 92.5th, 95th, and 97.5th percentiles of temperature with duration ≥2, 3, and 4 d. We used time-series analyses to estimate the community-specific heat wave-mortality relation over lags of 0-10 d. Then, we applied meta-analysis to pool heat wave effects at the country level for cumulative and lag effects for each type of heat wave definition. RESULTS: Heat waves of all definitions had significant cumulative associations with mortality in all countries, but varied by community. The higher the temperature threshold used to define heat waves, the higher heat wave associations on mortality. However, heat wave duration did not modify the impacts. The association between heat waves and mortality appeared acutely and lasted for 3 and 4 d. Heat waves had higher associations with mortality in moderate cold and moderate hot areas than cold and hot areas. There were no added effects of heat waves on mortality in all countries/regions, except for Brazil, Moldova, and Taiwan. Heat waves defined by daily mean and maximum temperatures produced similar heat wave-mortality associations, but not daily minimum temperature. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that high temperatures create a substantial health burden, and effects of high temperatures over consecutive days are similar to what would be experienced if high temperature days occurred independently. People living in moderate cold and moderate hot areas are more sensitive to heat waves than those living in cold and hot areas. Daily mean and maximum temperatures had similar ability to define heat waves rather than minimum temperature. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1026.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Calor Extremo
Mortalidade/tendências
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Brasil
Seres Humanos
Taiwan
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171012
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171012
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170909
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1289/EHP1026


  3 / 211 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28877241
[Au] Autor:Mathes RW; Ito K; Lane K; Matte TD
[Ad] Endereço:New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Queens, New York, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Real-time surveillance of heat-related morbidity: Relation to excess mortality associated with extreme heat.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(9):e0184364, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The impact of heat on mortality is well documented but deaths tend to occur after (or lag) extreme heat events, and mortality data is generally not available for timely surveillance during extreme heat events. Recently, systems for near-real time surveillance of heat illness have been reported but have not been validated as predictors of non-external cause of deaths associated with extreme heat events. We analyzed associations between daily weather conditions, emergency medical system (EMS) calls flagged as heat-related by EMS dispatchers, emergency department (ED) visits classified as heat-related based on chief complaint text, and excess non-external cause mortality in New York City. EMS and ED data were obtained from data reported daily to the city health department for syndromic surveillance. We fit generalized linear models to assess the relationships of daily counts of heat related EMS and ED visits to non-external cause deaths after adjustment for weather conditions during the months of May-September between 1999 and 2013. Controlling for temporal trends, a 7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2-12) and 6% (95% CI: 3-10) increase in non-external cause mortality was associated with an increase from the 50th percentile to 99th percentile of same-day and one-day lagged heat-related EMS calls and ED visits, respectively. After controlling for both temporal trends and weather, we observed a 7% (95% CI: 3-12) increase in non-external cause mortality associated with one-day lagged heat-related EMS calls and a 5% mortality increase with one-day lagged ED visits (95% CI: 2-8). Heat-related illness can be tracked during extreme heat events using EMS and ED data which are indicators of heat associated excess non-external cause mortality during the warm weather season.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Serviços Médicos de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos
Medicina de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos
Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/estatística & dados numéricos
Calor Extremo
Transtornos de Estresse por Calor/terapia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Emergências
Seres Humanos
Modelos Lineares
Morbidade
Cidade de Nova Iorque
Estações do Ano
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170907
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0184364


  4 / 211 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28796635
[Au] Autor:Ebi KL; Ogden NH; Semenza JC; Woodward A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Global Health, University of Washington , Seattle, Washington, USA.
[Ti] Título:Detecting and Attributing Health Burdens to Climate Change.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;125(8):085004, 2017 Aug 07.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Detection and attribution of health impacts caused by climate change uses formal methods to determine ) whether the occurrence of adverse health outcomes has changed, and ) the extent to which that change could be attributed to climate change. There have been limited efforts to undertake detection and attribution analyses in health. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to show a range of approaches for conducting detection and attribution analyses. RESULTS: Case studies for heatwaves, Lyme disease in Canada, and emergence in northern Europe highlight evidence that climate change is adversely affecting human health. Changes in rates and geographic distribution of adverse health outcomes were detected, and, in each instance, a proportion of the observed changes could, in our judgment, be attributed to changes in weather patterns associated with climate change. CONCLUSIONS: The results of detection and attribution studies can inform evidence-based risk management to reduce current, and plan for future, changes in health risks associated with climate change. Gaining a better understanding of the size, timing, and distribution of the climate change burden of disease and injury requires reliable long-term data sets, more knowledge about the factors that confound and modify the effects of climate on health, and refinement of analytic techniques for detection and attribution. At the same time, significant advances are possible in the absence of complete data and statistical certainty: there is a place for well-informed judgments, based on understanding of underlying processes and matching of patterns of health, climate, and other determinants of human well-being. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1509.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mudança Climática
Saúde Ambiental
Calor Extremo/efeitos adversos
Doença de Lyme/epidemiologia
Vibrioses/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Canadá/epidemiologia
Saúde Ambiental/métodos
Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia
Seres Humanos
Doença de Lyme/microbiologia
Vibrioses/microbiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171106
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171106
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170811
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1289/EHP1509


  5 / 211 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28520817
[Au] Autor:Diem JE; Stauber CE; Rothenberg R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Geosciences, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Heat in the southeastern United States: Characteristics, trends, and potential health impact.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(5):e0177937, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:High summer temperatures in extratropical areas have an impact on the public's health, mainly through heat stress, high air pollution concentrations, and the transmission of tropical diseases. The purpose of this study is to examine the current characteristics of heat events and future projections of summer apparent temperature (AT)-and associated health concerns-throughout the southeastern United States. Synoptic climatology was used to assess the atmospheric characteristics of extreme heat days (EHDs) from 1979-2015. Ozone concentrations also were examined during EHDs. Trends in summer-season AT over the 37-year period and correlations between AT and atmospheric circulation were determined. Mid-century estimates of summer AT were calculated using downscaled data from an ensemble of global climate models. EHDs throughout the Southeast were characterized by ridging and anticyclones over the Southeast and the presence of moist tropical air masses. Exceedingly high ozone concentrations occurred on EHDs in the Atlanta area and throughout central North Carolina. While summer ATs did not increase significantly from 1979-2015, summer ATs are projected to increase substantially by mid-century, with most the Southeast having ATs similar to that of present-day southern Florida (i.e., a tropical climate). High ozone concentrations should continue to occur during future heat events. Large urban areas are expected to be the most affected by the future warming, resulting from intensifying and expanding urban heat islands, a large increase in heat-vulnerable populations, and climate conditions that will be highly suitable for tropical-disease transmission by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. This nexus of vulnerability creates the potential for heat-related morbidity and mortality, as well as the appearance of disease not previously seen in the region. These effects can be attenuated by policies that reduce urban heat (e.g., cool roofs and green roofs) and that improve infrastructure (e.g. emergency services, conditioned space).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Calor Extremo/efeitos adversos
Nível de Saúde
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Cidades
Ozônio/efeitos adversos
Estações do Ano
Sudeste dos Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
66H7ZZK23N (Ozone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170906
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170906
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170519
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0177937


  6 / 211 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28432370
[Au] Autor:Gao H; Lan L; Yang C; Wang J; Zhao Y
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Chronic and Non-communicable Diseases, Harbin Center for Diseases Control and Prevention, Harbin, China.
[Ti] Título:The Threshold Temperature and Lag Effects on Daily Excess Mortality in Harbin, China: A Time Series Analysis.
[So] Source:Int J Occup Environ Med;8(2):85-95, 2017 04.
[Is] ISSN:2008-6814
[Cp] País de publicação:Iran
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: A large number of studies have reported the relationship between ambient temperature and mortality. However, few studies have focused on the effects of high temperatures on cardio-cerebrovascular diseases mortality (CCVDM) and their acute events (ACCVDM). OBJECTIVE: To assess the threshold temperature and time lag effects on daily excess mortality in Harbin, China. METHODS: A generalized additive model (GAM) with a Poisson distribution was used to investigate the relative risk of mortality for each 1 °C increase above the threshold temperature and their time lag effects in Harbin, China. RESULTS: High temperature threshold was 26 °C in Harbin. Heat effects were immediate and lasted for 0-6 and 0-4 days for CCVDM and ACCVDM, respectively. The acute cardiovascular disease mortality (ACVDM) seemed to be more sensitive to temperature than cardiovascular disease mortality (CVDM) with higher death risk and shorter time lag effects. The lag effects lasted longer for cerebrovascular disease mortality (CBDM) than CVDM; so did ACBDM compared to ACVDM. CONCLUSION: Hot temperatures increased CCVDM and ACCVDM in Harbin, China. Public health intervention strategies for hot temperatures adaptation should be concerned.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças Cardiovasculares/mortalidade
Calor Extremo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Doença Aguda
Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Transtornos Cerebrovasculares/mortalidade
Criança
Pré-Escolar
China/epidemiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Recém-Nascido
Masculino
Saúde Pública
Fatores de Tempo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170916
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170916
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170423
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.15171/ijoem.2017.979


  7 / 211 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28358338
[Au] Autor:Azhar G; Saha S; Ganguly P; Mavalankar D; Madrigano J
[Ad] Endereço:The RAND Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90401, USA. gazhar@rand.org.
[Ti] Título:Heat Wave Vulnerability Mapping for India.
[So] Source:Int J Environ Res Public Health;14(4), 2017 Mar 30.
[Is] ISSN:1660-4601
[Cp] País de publicação:Switzerland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Assessing geographic variability in heat wave vulnerability forms the basis for planning appropriate targeted adaptation strategies. Given several recent deadly heatwaves in India, heat is increasingly being recognized as a public health problem. However, to date there has not been a country-wide assessment of heat vulnerability in India. We evaluated demographic, socioeconomic, and environmental vulnerability factors and combined district level data from several sources including the most recent census, health reports, and satellite remote sensing data. We then applied principal component analysis (PCA) on 17 normalized variables for each of the 640 districts to create a composite Heat Vulnerability Index (HVI) for India. Of the total 640 districts, our analysis identified 10 and 97 districts in the very high and high risk categories (> 2SD and 2-1SD HVI) respectively. Mapping showed that the districts with higher heat vulnerability are located in the central parts of the country. On examination, these are less urbanized and have low rates of literacy, access to water and sanitation, and presence of household amenities. Therefore, we concluded that creating and mapping a heat vulnerability index is a useful first step in protecting the public from the health burden of heat. Future work should incorporate heat exposure and health outcome data to validate the index, as well as examine sub-district levels of vulnerability.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Calor Extremo/efeitos adversos
Mapeamento Geográfico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Índia
Lactente
Recém-Nascido
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Saúde Pública
Medição de Risco/métodos
Fatores de Risco
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170807
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170807
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170331
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  8 / 211 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28352286
[Au] Autor:Houghton A; Austin J; Beerman A; Horton C
[Ad] Endereço:Biositu, LLC, 505D W Alabama St., Houston, TX 77006, USA.
[Ti] Título:An Approach to Developing Local Climate Change Environmental Public Health Indicators in a Rural District.
[So] Source:J Environ Public Health;2017:3407325, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1687-9813
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Climate change represents a significant and growing threat to population health. Rural areas face unique challenges, such as high rates of vulnerable populations; economic uncertainty due to their reliance on industries that are vulnerable to climate change; less resilient infrastructure; and lower levels of access to community and emergency services than urban areas. This article fills a gap in public health practice by developing climate and health environmental public health indicators for a local public health department in a rural area. We adapted the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network's framework for climate and health indicators to a seven-county health department in Western Kentucky. Using a three-step review process, we identified primary climate-related environmental public health hazards for the region (extreme heat, drought, and flooding) and a suite of related exposure, health outcome, population vulnerability, and environmental vulnerability indicators. Indicators that performed more poorly at the county level than at the state and national level were defined as "high vulnerability." Six to eight high vulnerability indicators were identified for each county. The local health department plans to use the results to enhance three key areas of existing services: epidemiology, public health preparedness, and community health assessment.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mudança Climática
Secas
Saúde Ambiental/métodos
Calor Extremo/efeitos adversos
Inundações
Saúde Pública/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Kentucky
População Rural
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170906
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170906
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170330
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2017/3407325


  9 / 211 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28345679
[Au] Autor:Bijelovic S; Dragic N; Bijelovic M; Kovacevic M; Jevtic M; Ninkovic Mrdenovacki O
[Ad] Endereço:University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Republic of Serbia (Faculty of Medicine). sanja.bijelovic@mf.uns.ac.rs.
[Ti] Título:Impact of climate conditions on hospital admissions for subcategories of cardiovascular diseases.
[Ti] Título:Impact of climate conditions on hospital admissions for subcategories of cardiovascular diseases..
[So] Source:Med Pr;68(2):189-197, 2017 Mar 24.
[Is] ISSN:0465-5893
[Cp] País de publicação:Poland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The aim of this study has been to examine the association between climate conditions (CC) and hospital admissions for the subcategories of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), according to patients' age. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From January 2010 through December 2011, the daily number of hospital admissions for angina pectoris (AP), essential hypertension (EH), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and ischemic heart diseases (IHD) for adults (19-64 years old) and the elderly (≥ 65 years old), as well as for the CC (N = 728 days) was collected for multivariate Poisson regression analysis, confounding with season and weekends. The results were expressed by using the relative risk with the corresponding 95% confidence interval. RESULTS: The risk for the AMI among the adults and the elderly is significantly higher for 41.8% and 38.9%, respectively on the days with lower ambient temperature and lesser for 32.7% and 29.8%, respectively on the days with lower air pressure values. The risk for the IHD among the elderly is significantly higher on the days with lower ambient temperature and lower relative humidity for 50.6% and 37.4%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings explain how the CC and subcategories of CVD are associated, which could be used for adequate public awareness of the risk for hospitalization due to climate conditions. Med Pr 2017;68(2):189-197.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia
Admissão do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos
Estações do Ano
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Fatores Etários
Idoso
Calor Extremo
Seres Humanos
Umidade
Meia-Idade
Sérvia/epidemiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170901
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170901
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170328
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 211 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28176761
[Au] Autor:Fisher JA; Jiang C; Soneja SI; Mitchell C; Puett RC; Sapkota A
[Ad] Endereço:Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health, University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park, Maryland, USA.
[Ti] Título:Summertime extreme heat events and increased risk of acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations.
[So] Source:J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol;27(3):276-280, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1559-064X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Few studies have examined the association between exposure to extreme heat events and risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or demonstrated which populations are most vulnerable to the effects of extreme heat. We defined extreme heat events as days when the daily maximum temperature (TMAX) exceeded the location- and calendar day-specific 95th percentile of the distribution of daily TMAX during the 30-year baseline period (1960-1989). We used a time-stratified case-crossover design to analyze the association between exposure to extreme heat events and risk of hospitalization for AMI in the summer months (June-August) with 0, 1, or 2 lag days. There were a total of 32,670 AMI hospitalizations during the summer months in Maryland between 2000 and 2012. Overall, extreme heat events on the day of hospitalization were associated with an increased risk of AMI (lag 0 OR=1.11; 95% CI: 1.05-1.17). Results considering lag periods immediately before hospitalization were comparable, but effect estimates varied among several population subgroups. As extreme weather events are expected to become more frequent and intense in response to our changing climate, community-specific adaptation strategies are needed to account for the differential susceptibility across ethnic subgroups and geographic areas.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Calor Extremo/efeitos adversos
Infarto do Miocárdio/epidemiologia
Infarto do Miocárdio/etiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Afroamericanos/estatística & dados numéricos
Distribuição por Idade
Idoso
Estudos Epidemiológicos
Grupos Étnicos
Feminino
Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos
Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos
Temperatura Alta
Seres Humanos
Modelos Logísticos
Masculino
Maryland/epidemiologia
Meia-Idade
Fatores de Risco
Estações do Ano
Distribuição por Sexo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171020
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171020
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/jes.2016.83



página 1 de 22 ir para página                         
   


Refinar a pesquisa
  Base de dados : MEDLINE Formulário avançado   

    Pesquisar no campo  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/OPAS/OMS - Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde