Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : H02.403.840 [Categoria DeCS]
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  1 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28466547
[Au] Autor:Inch J; Notman F; Watson M; Green D; Baird R; Ferguson J; Hind C; McKinstry B; Strath A; Bond C; Telepharmacy Research Team
[Ad] Endereço:Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
[Ti] Título:Tele-pharmacy in rural Scotland: a proof of concept study.
[So] Source:Int J Pharm Pract;25(3):210-219, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7174
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:INTRODUCTION: Technology enables medical services to be provided to rural communities. This proof of concept study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of delivering community pharmacy services (CPS; including advice, sale of over-the-counter products and dispensing of prescriptions) by tele-technology (the Telepharmacy Robotic Supply Service (TPRSS)) to a rural population in Scotland. METHODS: Data collection included the following: postal surveys to local residents; focus groups/ interviews with pharmacists, other healthcare professionals (HCPs) and service users, at baseline and follow-up; TPRSS logs. Interviews/focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Descriptive statistics were reported for survey data. RESULTS: Qualitative results: Pre-installation: residents expressed satisfaction with current pharmacy access. HCPs believed the TPRSS would improve pharmacy access and reduce pressure on GPs. Concerns included costs, confidentiality, patient safety and 'fear' of technology. Post-installation: residents and pharmacy staff were positive, finding the service easy to use. Quantitative results: Pre-installation: almost half the respondents received regular prescription medicines and a third used an over-the-counter (OTC) medicine at least monthly. More than 80% (124/156) reported they would use the TPRSS. There was low awareness of the minor ailment service (MAS; 38%; 59/156). Post-installation: prescription ordering and OTC medicine purchase were used most frequently; the video link was used infrequently. Reasons for non-use were lack of need (36%; 40/112) and linkage to only one pharmacy (31%; 35/112). DISCUSSION: Community pharmacy services delivered remotely using tele-technology are feasible and acceptable. A larger study should be undertaken to confirm the potential of the TPRSS to reduce health inequalities in rural areas.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Farmácia/tendências
Serviços de Saúde Rural/tendências
Telemedicina/tendências
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Serviços Comunitários de Farmácia
Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos
Estudos de Viabilidade
Feminino
Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Medicamentos sem Prescrição
Farmacêuticos
População Rural
Escócia
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Nonprescription Drugs)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/ijpp.12376


  2 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29489688
[Au] Autor:Akiyama H; Hasegawa Y
[Ti] Título:A trial case of medical treatment for primary headache using telemedicine.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(9):e9891, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:RATIONALE: Video-based treatment in telemedicine is a potential alternative to face-to-face treatment. We describe our trial use of telemedicine to treat a patient with primary headache. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 25-year-old woman visited our branch hospital with a chief complaint of recurrent headache. Our branch hospital had no headache specialist, so a headache specialist at our main hospital provided treatment remotely. DIAGNOSES: She was diagnosed with migraine without aura by the headache specialist using telemedicine. INTERVENTIONS: The branch hospital physician and the headache specialist used video conferencing to interview and examine the patient and share cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Audio and camera angle/zoom could be adjusted during interviews, and high-quality video was continuously displayed at both hospitals simultaneously without lag between audio and video. Temporal/spatial resolution was sufficient for proper neurological evaluation. MRI had sufficient image quality and resolution for detailed interpretation. A prescription for medication was issued by the branch hospital physician and confirmed by the headache specialist. OUTCOMES: Zolmitriptan was effective in treating her migraine. LESSONS: Telemedicine was useful for treating this primary headache patient and can contribute to regional health care. Future challenges in telemedicine include expanding its use to other areas within the purview of general physicians and headache specialists, covering implementation and maintenance costs, providing adequate explanations to patients and family members, ensuring security of video transmissions, maintaining patient medical records, and supervising treatment.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Enxaqueca sem Aura/diagnóstico
Telemedicina/métodos
Videoconferência
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Enxaqueca sem Aura/terapia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180307
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180307
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180301
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009891


  3 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29258979
[Au] Autor:Britt RK; Collins WB; Wilson K; Linnemeier G; Englebert AM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, United States.
[Ti] Título:eHealth Literacy and Health Behaviors Affecting Modern College Students: A Pilot Study of Issues Identified by the American College Health Association.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(12):e392, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) has been widely adopted by researchers to understand how eHealth literacy can be put into context. eHealth researchers need to know how to promote positive health behavior changes across college students, given the importance of the Internet to acquire and use health information. The American College Health Association identified a set of key health issues that affect college students today. By understanding how eHEALS might be related to college students' maintenance of their health and their use of online health resources, researchers will be provided with a better understanding of eHealth literacy and its pragmatic implications for health campaigns and future interventions. OBJECTIVE: The goal of the study was to examine what eHEALS reveals about college student health behaviors identified by the American College Health Association. To understand college student current health maintenance and their intentions to maintain their health and use online resources, the theory of planned behavior was used as the theoretical framework for the study. METHODS: Data were collected via a survey of 422 college students that included the eHEALS measure and questions about health issues based on the recommendations of the American College Health Association. These questions asked about college student current health, subsequent use of online health resources, and their intention to maintain their health and make use of such resources in the future. RESULTS: eHEALS was positively and significantly associated with all 8 areas of health issues identified by the American College Health Association for college student current maintenance of health and use of online health resources and for future intention of health maintenance and use of online resources. Key issues that emerged with eHealth literacy were maintaining safe sex practices and seeking out related information, seeking out information on an exercise regime, information on vaccinations, and maintaining a balanced diet. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest several areas that may be targeted for future health campaigns toward college students. In addition, eHEALS was found to be a useful instrument for college students in the United States. Lastly, these results point to a need to deliver targeted information to college students, particularly since eHEALS captures literacy based on positively phrased items.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde
Alfabetização em Saúde/métodos
Internet/utilização
Telemedicina/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Projetos Piloto
Estudantes
Inquéritos e Questionários
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.3100


  4 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29258977
[Au] Autor:Low CA; Dey AK; Ferreira D; Kamarck T; Sun W; Bae S; Doryab A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
[Ti] Título:Estimation of Symptom Severity During Chemotherapy From Passively Sensed Data: Exploratory Study.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(12):e420, 2017 Dec 19.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Physical and psychological symptoms are common during chemotherapy in cancer patients, and real-time monitoring of these symptoms can improve patient outcomes. Sensors embedded in mobile phones and wearable activity trackers could be potentially useful in monitoring symptoms passively, with minimal patient burden. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore whether passively sensed mobile phone and Fitbit data could be used to estimate daily symptom burden during chemotherapy. METHODS: A total of 14 patients undergoing chemotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer participated in the 4-week study. Participants carried an Android phone and wore a Fitbit device for the duration of the study and also completed daily severity ratings of 12 common symptoms. Symptom severity ratings were summed to create a total symptom burden score for each day, and ratings were centered on individual patient means and categorized into low, average, and high symptom burden days. Day-level features were extracted from raw mobile phone sensor and Fitbit data and included features reflecting mobility and activity, sleep, phone usage (eg, duration of interaction with phone and apps), and communication (eg, number of incoming and outgoing calls and messages). We used a rotation random forests classifier with cross-validation and resampling with replacement to evaluate population and individual model performance and correlation-based feature subset selection to select nonredundant features with the best predictive ability. RESULTS: Across 295 days of data with both symptom and sensor data, a number of mobile phone and Fitbit features were correlated with patient-reported symptom burden scores. We achieved an accuracy of 88.1% for our population model. The subset of features with the best accuracy included sedentary behavior as the most frequent activity, fewer minutes in light physical activity, less variable and average acceleration of the phone, and longer screen-on time and interactions with apps on the phone. Mobile phone features had better predictive ability than Fitbit features. Accuracy of individual models ranged from 78.1% to 100% (mean 88.4%), and subsets of relevant features varied across participants. CONCLUSIONS: Passive sensor data, including mobile phone accelerometer and usage and Fitbit-assessed activity and sleep, were related to daily symptom burden during chemotherapy. These findings highlight opportunities for long-term monitoring of cancer patients during chemotherapy with minimal patient burden as well as real-time adaptive interventions aimed at early management of worsening or severe symptoms.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tratamento Farmacológico/métodos
Neoplasias/tratamento farmacológico
Neoplasias/terapia
Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente
Telemedicina/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.9046


  5 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28743680
[Au] Autor:Micheel CM; Anderson IA; Lee P; Chen SC; Justiss K; Giuse NB; Ye F; Kusnoor SV; Levy MA
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States.
[Ti] Título:Internet-Based Assessment of Oncology Health Care Professional Learning Style and Optimization of Materials for Web-Based Learning: Controlled Trial With Concealed Allocation.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(7):e265, 2017 Jul 25.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Precision medicine has resulted in increasing complexity in the treatment of cancer. Web-based educational materials can help address the needs of oncology health care professionals seeking to understand up-to-date treatment strategies. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess learning styles of oncology health care professionals and to determine whether learning style-tailored educational materials lead to enhanced learning. METHODS: In all, 21,465 oncology health care professionals were invited by email to participate in the fully automated, parallel group study. Enrollment and follow-up occurred between July 13 and September 7, 2015. Self-enrolled participants took a learning style survey and were assigned to the intervention or control arm using concealed alternating allocation. Participants in the intervention group viewed educational materials consistent with their preferences for learning (reading, listening, and/or watching); participants in the control group viewed educational materials typical of the My Cancer Genome website. Educational materials covered the topic of treatment of metastatic estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer using cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (CDK4/6) inhibitors. Participant knowledge was assessed immediately before (pretest), immediately after (posttest), and 2 weeks after (follow-up test) review of the educational materials. Study statisticians were blinded to group assignment. RESULTS: A total of 751 participants enrolled in the study. Of these, 367 (48.9%) were allocated to the intervention arm and 384 (51.1%) were allocated to the control arm. Of those allocated to the intervention arm, 256 (69.8%) completed all assessments. Of those allocated to the control arm, 296 (77.1%) completed all assessments. An additional 12 participants were deemed ineligible and one withdrew. Of the 552 participants, 438 (79.3%) self-identified as multimodal learners. The intervention arm showed greater improvement in posttest score compared to the control group (0.4 points or 4.0% more improvement on average; P=.004) and a higher follow-up test score than the control group (0.3 points or 3.3% more improvement on average; P=.02). CONCLUSIONS: Although the study demonstrated more learning with learning style-tailored educational materials, the magnitude of increased learning and the largely multimodal learning styles preferred by the study participants lead us to conclude that future content-creation efforts should focus on multimodal educational materials rather than learning style-tailored content.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação a Distância/normas
Pessoal de Saúde/normas
Disseminação de Informação/métodos
Internet/utilização
Oncologia/normas
Medicina de Precisão/métodos
Telemedicina/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Aprendizagem
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Inquéritos e Questionários
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170727
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.7506


  6 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28455277
[Au] Autor:Pastora-Bernal JM; Martín-Valero R; Barón-López FJ; Estebanez-Pérez MJ
[Ad] Endereço:Faculty of Health Sciences, Physiotherapy, University of Málaga, Malaga, Spain.
[Ti] Título:Evidence of Benefit of Telerehabitation After Orthopedic Surgery: A Systematic Review.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(4):e142, 2017 Apr 28.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: In addition to traditional physiotherapy, studies based on telerehabilitation programs have published the results of effectiveness, validity, noninferiority, and important advantages in some neurological, cognitive, and musculoskeletal disorders, providing an opportunity to define new social policies and interventions. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the effects of telerehabilitation after surgical procedures on orthopedic conditions as well as to describe how interventions are designed and to determine whether telerehabilitation is comparable with conventional methods of delivery. This systematic review summarizes the levels of evidence and grades of recommendation regarding telerehabilitation intervention (synchronous or asynchronous provided via the telerehabilitation medium, either in conjunction with, or in isolation of, other treatment interventions) after surgical procedures on orthopedic conditions. METHODS: Study quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scores and grade of recommendation following the recommendation of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. RESULTS: We found 3 studies with PEDro scores between 6 and 8, which is considered as level 1 evidence (good; 20% [3/15]), 4 studies with a score of 5, which is considered as level 2 evidence (acceptable; 27% [4/15]), and the remaining 8 studies had scores of 4 or less, which is considered (poor; 53% [8/15]). A total of 1316 participants received telerehabilitation intervention in the selected studies, where knee and hip replacement were 75% of all the studies. Strong and moderate grades of evidence (grade of recommendation A-B) were found in knee and hip replacement interventions. Studies on the upper limb were 25% of the studies, but only 1 study presented a moderate grade of evidence (grade of recommendation B) and the rest were of poor methodological quality with weak evidence (grade of recommendation C). CONCLUSIONS: Conclusive evidence on the efficacy of telerehabilitation for treatment after an orthopedic surgery, regardless of pathology, was not obtained. We found strong evidence in favor of telerehabilitation in patients following total knee and hip arthroplasty and limited evidence in the upper limb interventions (moderate and weak evidence). Future research needs to be more extensive and conclusive. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first attempt at evaluating the quality of telerehabilitation intervention research after surgical procedures on orthopedic conditions in a systematic review. Clinical messages and future research recommendations are included in the review.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Medicina Baseada em Evidências/métodos
Ortopedia/métodos
Telemedicina/métodos
Telerreabilitação/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170430
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.6836


  7 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28450271
[Au] Autor:Latulippe K; Hamel C; Giroux D
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Studies of Teaching and Learning, Laval University, Québec, QC, Canada.
[Ti] Título:Social Health Inequalities and eHealth: A Literature Review With Qualitative Synthesis of Theoretical and Empirical Studies.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(4):e136, 2017 Apr 27.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: eHealth is developing rapidly and brings with it a promise to reduce social health inequalities (SHIs). Yet, it appears that it also has the potential to increase them. OBJECTIVES: The general objective of this review was to set out how to ensure that eHealth contributes to reducing SHIs rather than exacerbating them. This review has three objectives: (1) identifying characteristics of people at risk of experiencing social inequality in health; (2) determining the possibilities of developing eHealth tools that avoid increasing SHI; and (3) modeling the process of using an eHealth tool by people vulnerable to SHI. METHODS: Following the EPPI approach (Evidence for Policy and Practice of Information of the Institute of Education at the University of London), two databases were searched for the terms SHIs and eHealth and their derivatives in titles and abstracts. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed articles were included and evaluated. The software NVivo (QSR International) was employed to extract the data and allow for a metasynthesis of the data. RESULTS: Of the 73 articles retained, 10 were theoretical, 7 were from reviews, and 56 were based on empirical studies. Of the latter, 40 used a quantitative approach, 8 used a qualitative approach, 4 used mixed methods approach, and only 4 were based on participatory research-action approach. The digital divide in eHealth is a serious barrier and contributes greatly to SHI. Ethnicity and low income are the most commonly used characteristics to identify people at risk of SHI. The most promising actions for reducing SHI via eHealth are to aim for universal access to the tool of eHealth, become aware of users' literacy level, create eHealth tools that respect the cultural attributes of future users, and encourage the participation of people at risk of SHI. CONCLUSIONS: eHealth has the potential to widen the gulf between those at risk of SHI and the rest of the population. The widespread expansion of eHealth technologies calls for rigorous consideration of interventions, which are not likely to exacerbate SHI.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conhecimentos em Informática/estatística & dados numéricos
Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde
Internet/utilização
Telemedicina/utilização
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos
Pesquisa Qualitativa
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.6731


  8 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29406653
[Au] Autor:Smith NM; Satyshur RD
[Ti] Título:Pediatric Diabetes Telemedicine Program Improves Access to Care for Rural Families: Role of APRNs.
[So] Source:Pediatr Nurs;42(6):294-9, 2016 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0097-9805
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Type 1 diabetes mellitus has increased in children by 23% from 2001 to 2009. Rural communities additionally have increased disparities related to access barriers and a large minority population with poorer overall health. Research evidence supports telemedicine as an effective alternative to bring preventive diabetes care to remote areas. This article presents an overview of the leadership role of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) with the implementation and evaluation of a pediatric diabetes telemedicine program at a rural pediatric outpatient specialty clinic in partnership with a tertiary center telemedicine network. The telemedicine program quality improvement (QI) project explored caregiver satisfaction with a convenience sample of caregivers (N = 14) using a nine-item Telemedicine Diabetes Caregiver Satisfaction Survey (TDCSS), with responses ranging from 1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree. Findings indicate caregivers were highly satisfied with communication/ privacy (M = 4.8), access to care (M = 4.1), and quality of services (M = 5.0). The multidisciplinary collaborative teamwork, continuous QI, and dependable technology were integral to the quality of the telemedicine clinical initiative. APRNs provided technology expertise, interdisciplinary collaboration leadership, care coordination, and advocacy for policy changes. Results demonstrate that telemedicine and APRN leadership can help implement innovative programs into rural communities to improve access to care, healthcare cost, and outcomes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Prática Avançada de Enfermagem/organização & administração
Assistência à Saúde/métodos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/enfermagem
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/prevenção & controle
Papel do Profissional de Enfermagem
Enfermagem Pediátrica/métodos
Telemedicina/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Recém-Nascido
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Satisfação do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos
População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos
Inquéritos e Questionários
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28459902
[Au] Autor:Najafi N; Harrison JD; Duong J; Greenberg A; Cheng HQ
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Hospital Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
[Ti] Título:It All Just Clicks: Development of an Inpatient E-Consult Program.
[So] Source:J Hosp Med;12(5):332-334, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1553-5606
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Although the use of electronic consultations (e-consults) in the outpatient setting is commonplace, there is little evidence of their use in the inpatient setting. Often, the only choice hospitalists have is between requesting a time-consuming in-person consultation or requesting an informal, undocumented "curbside" consultation. For a new, remote hospital in our healthcare system, we developed an e-consult protocol that can be used to address simple consultation questions. In the first year of the program, 143 e-consults occurred; the top 5 consultants were infectious disease, hematology, endocrinology, nephrology, and cardiology. Over the first 4 months, no safety issues were identified in chart review audits; to date, no safety issues have been identified through the hospital's incident reporting system. In surveys, hospitalists were universally pleased with the quality of e-consult recommendations, though only 43% of consultantsagreed. With appropriate care for patient selection, e-consults can be used to safely and efficiently provide subspecialty expertise to a remote inpatient site Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:332-334.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Hospitais Universitários/tendências
Desenvolvimento de Programas/métodos
Encaminhamento e Consulta/tendências
Telemedicina/métodos
Telemedicina/tendências
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Medicina Hospitalar/métodos
Medicina Hospitalar/tendências
Médicos Hospitalares/tendências
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.12788/jhm.2740


  10 / 16121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29437321
[Ti] Título:Millennials Most Enthusiastic About Telemedicine.
[So] Source:J AHIMA;87(11):76, 2016 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1060-5487
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atitude
Telemedicina
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Fatores Etários
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180301
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180301
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:H
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180214
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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BIREME/OPAS/OMS - Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde