Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : HP1.007.338 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 176 [refinar]
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  1 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28094230
[Au] Autor:Richards D; Emmanuel E; Grace S
[Ad] Endereço:School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University Gold Coast Campus, Southern Cross Drive, Bilinga QLD 4225, Australia. Electronic address: dmrdc@bigpond.net.au.
[Ti] Título:Duelling Ontologies: Might Vitalism Offer Balance and Value?
[So] Source:Explore (NY);13(2):133-138, 2017 Mar - Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-7541
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This article is part of a project investigating chiropractors' beliefs on the role of vitalism in their philosophical and practice approaches and how that might contribute to addressing current epidemics of non-communicable diseases. It aims to present atomism, reductionism, materialism and mechanism as fundamental ontologies in biomedicine and to examine what role these might play in its struggle to deal with these epidemics; to present vitalism as a fundamental ontology existing in chiropractic along with these ontologies of biomedicine; and to discuss how imbalances in the use of these ontologies and practices stemming from them might be contributing to difficulties in addressing these epidemics. The use of more balanced approaches by chiropractors involving not only mechanistic biomedical ontologies but also an increased focus on vitalism might offer value in addressing these epidemics and should be investigated.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Vitalismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Ontologias Biológicas
Quiroprática
Doença Crônica/prevenção & controle
Doença Crônica/terapia
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171101
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171101
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170118
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27854052
[Au] Autor:Duchesneau F
[Ad] Endereço:Département de Philosophie, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-ville, Montréal, QC, H3C 3J7, Canada. francois.duchesneau@umontreal.ca.
[Ti] Título:Laws of organization and chemical analysis: Blainville and Müller.
[So] Source:Hist Philos Life Sci;38(4):20, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0391-9714
[Cp] País de publicação:Switzerland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:When "general physiology" emerged as a basic field of research within biology in the early nineteenth century, Henri Ducrotay de Blainville (1777-1850) on the one hand and Johannes Peter Müller (1801-1858) on the other appealed to chemical analysis to account for the properties and operations of organisms that were observed to differ from what was found in inorganic compounds. Their aim was to establish laws of vital organization that would be based on organic chemical processes, but would also be of use to explain morphological and functional differences among life forms. The intent of this paper is to specify for each of these leading physiologists the different presuppositions that provided theoretical frameworks for their interpretation of what they conceived of as laws of organization underpinning the dynamics of vital phenomena. Blainville presumed that the properties of organic compounds depended on the chemical properties of their constitutive molecules, but combined according to patterns of functional development, and that the latter could only be inferred from an empirical survey of modes of organization across the spectrum of life forms. For Müller, while all vital processes involved chemical reactions, in the formative and functional operations of organisms, these reactions would result from the action of life forces that were responsible for the production of organic combinations and thus for vital and animal functions. As both physiologists set significant methodological patterns for their many disciples and followers, their respective quasi-reductionist and anti-reductionist positions need to be accounted for.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fisiologia/história
Vitalismo/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
França
Alemanha
História do Século XIX
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:BIOGRAPHY; HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Ps] Nome de pessoa como assunto:Blainville HM; Müller JP
[Em] Mês de entrada:1703
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170606
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170606
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; QIS
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161118
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40656-016-0122-1


  3 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26592086
[Au] Autor:Drouin E; Drouin-Masson M
[Ti] Título:Synthetic biology. A tribute to S. Leduc (1853-1939, Nantes, France) and an Answer to the Return of Vitalism.
[So] Source:Vesalius;21(1):80-5, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1373-4857
[Cp] País de publicação:Belgium
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:A very large number of articles about vitalism have been published since 1894 in the journal Science. Vitalism is a theory according to which living organisms appear to possess something more than inanimate objects. The "vital principle" is minted in 1778 by Barthez in "Les nouveaux éléments de la science de l'homme", (Stahl talks of phlogiston for chemistry). In their view, the life of the whole is not the simple sum of the life of the components. Such a view was hatched in response to the Cartesian mechanist interpretation of living matter as proposed by Galileo and Descartes. Vitalist intuition was revived in the XXth century by new researchers such as Henri Bergson ("l'élan vital" or 'vital force') in France and Hans Driesch ("entelechy") in Germany. Could this view of life now be making a comeback in biology?
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Biologia Sintética/história
Vitalismo/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: França
História do Século XIX
História do Século XX
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:BIOGRAPHY; HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Ps] Nome de pessoa como assunto:Leduc S
[Em] Mês de entrada:1512
[Cu] Atualização por classe:151123
[Lr] Data última revisão:
151123
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:QIS
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:151124
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  4 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26452775
[Au] Autor:Nicholson DJ; Gawne R
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for the Study of Life Sciences (Egenis), University of Exeter, Byrne House, St. German's Road, Exeter, EX4 4PJ, UK. dan.j.nicholson@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Neither logical empiricism nor vitalism, but organicism: what the philosophy of biology was.
[So] Source:Hist Philos Life Sci;37(4):345-81, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0391-9714
[Cp] País de publicação:Switzerland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Philosophy of biology is often said to have emerged in the last third of the twentieth century. Prior to this time, it has been alleged that the only authors who engaged philosophically with the life sciences were either logical empiricists who sought to impose the explanatory ideals of the physical sciences onto biology, or vitalists who invoked mystical agencies in an attempt to ward off the threat of physicochemical reduction. These schools paid little attention to actual biological science, and as a result philosophy of biology languished in a state of futility for much of the twentieth century. The situation, we are told, only began to change in the late 1960s and early 1970s, when a new generation of researchers began to focus on problems internal to biology, leading to the consolidation of the discipline. In this paper we challenge this widely accepted narrative of the history of philosophy of biology. We do so by arguing that the most important tradition within early twentieth-century philosophy of biology was neither logical empiricism nor vitalism, but the organicist movement that flourished between the First and Second World Wars. We show that the organicist corpus is thematically and methodologically continuous with the contemporary literature in order to discredit the view that early work in the philosophy of biology was unproductive, and we emphasize the desirability of integrating the historical and contemporary conversations into a single, unified discourse.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Biologia/história
Filosofia/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Empirismo
História do Século XX
Vitalismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1603
[Cu] Atualização por classe:151201
[Lr] Data última revisão:
151201
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; QIS
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:151011
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40656-015-0085-7


  5 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:26089349
[Au] Autor:Bastian B; Bain P; Buhrmester MD; Gómez Á; Vázquez A; Knight CG; Swann WB
[Ad] Endereço:University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia b.bastian@uq.edu.au.
[Ti] Título:Moral Vitalism: Seeing Good and Evil as Real, Agentic Forces.
[So] Source:Pers Soc Psychol Bull;41(8):1069-81, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1552-7433
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Moral vitalism refers to a tendency to view good and evil as actual forces that can influence people and events. We introduce a scale designed to assess the belief in moral vitalism. High scorers on the scale endorse items such as "There are underlying forces of good and evil in this world." After establishing the reliability and criterion validity of the scale (Studies 1, 2a, and 2b), we examined the predictive validity of the moral vitalism scale, showing that "moral vitalists" worry about being possessed by evil (Study 3), being contaminated through contact with evil people (Study 4), and forfeiting their own mental purity (Study 5). We discuss the nature of moral vitalism and the implications of the construct for understanding the role of metaphysical lay theories about the nature of good and evil in moral reasoning.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cognição
Princípios Morais
Religião
Vitalismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1604
[Cu] Atualização por classe:150710
[Lr] Data última revisão:
150710
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150620
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0146167215589819


  6 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25324429
[Au] Autor:Hendriksen MM
[Ad] Endereço:University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Título:Anatomical Mercury: Changing Understandings of Quicksilver, Blood, and the Lymphatic System, 1650-1800.
[So] Source:J Hist Med Allied Sci;70(4):516-48, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1468-4373
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The use of mercury as an injection mass in anatomical experiments and preparations was common throughout Europe in the long eighteenth century, and refined mercury-injected preparations as well as plates of anatomical mercury remain today. The use and meaning of mercury in related disciplines such as medicine and chemistry in the same period have been studied, but our knowledge of anatomical mercury is sparse and tends to focus on technicalities. This article argues that mercury had a distinct meaning in anatomy, which was initially influenced by alchemical and classical understandings of mercury. Moreover, it demonstrates that the choice of mercury as an anatomical injection mass was deliberate and informed by an intricate cultural understanding of its materiality, and that its use in anatomical preparations and its perception as an anatomical material evolved with the understanding of the circulatory and lymphatic systems. By using the material culture of anatomical mercury as a starting point, I seek to provide a new, object-driven interpretation of complex and strongly interrelated historiographical categories such as mechanism, vitalism, chemistry, anatomy, and physiology, which are difficult to understand through a historiography that focuses exclusively on ideas.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anatomia/métodos
Vasos Sanguíneos/anatomia & histologia
Sistema Linfático/anatomia & histologia
Mercúrio/história
Preservação Biológica/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Alquimia
Anatomia/história
Europa (Continente)
Historiografia
História do Século XVII
História do Século XVIII
Seres Humanos
Injeções/métodos
Vitalismo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
FXS1BY2PGL (Mercury)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1701
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170111
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170111
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; QIS
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:141018
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/jhmas/jru030


  7 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25099169
[Au] Autor:Russell D
[Ad] Endereço:, 60 Edinboro Street, Mount Hawthorn, WA, 6016, Australia, adougrus@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Toward a Pragmatist Epistemology: Arthur O. Lovejoy's and H. S. Jennings's Biophilosophical Responses to Neovitalism, 1909-1914.
[So] Source:J Hist Biol;48(1):37-66, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0022-5010
[Cp] País de publicação:Germany
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The sustained interdisciplinary debate about neovitalism between two Johns Hopkins University colleagues, philosopher Arthur O. Lovejoy and experimental geneticist H. S. Jennings, in the period 1911-1914, was the basis for their theoretical reconceptualization of scientific knowledge as contingent and necessarily incomplete in its account of nature. Their response to Hans Driesch's neovitalist concept of entelechy, and his challenge to the continuity between biology and the inorganic sciences, resulted in a historically significant articulation of genetics and philosophy. This study traces the debate's shift of problem-focus away from neovitalism's threat to the unity of science - "organic autonomy," as Lovejoy put it - and toward the potential for development of a nonmechanististic, nonrationalist theory of scientific knowledge. The result was a new pragmatist epistemology, based on Lovejoy's and Jennings's critiques of the inadequacy of pragmatism's account of scientific knowledge. The first intellectual move, drawing on naturalism and pragmatism, was based on a reinterpretation of science as organized experience. The second, sparked by Henri Bergson's theory of creative evolution, and drawing together elements of Dewey's and James's pragmatisms, produced a new account of the contingency and necessary incompleteness of scientific knowledge. Prompted by the neovitalists' mix of a priori concepts and, in Driesch's case, and adherence to empiricism, Lovejoy's and Jennings's developing pragmatist epistemologies of science explored the interrelation between rationalism and empiricism.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conhecimento
Vitalismo/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Empirismo/história
História do Século XX
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:BIOGRAPHY; HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Ps] Nome de pessoa como assunto:Lovejoy AO; Jennings HS
[Em] Mês de entrada:1509
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171020
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171020
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:QIS
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140808
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10739-014-9388-x


  8 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25707100
[Au] Autor:Wolfe CT
[Ti] Título:Teleomechanism redux? Functional physiology and hybrid models of life in early modern natural philosophy.
[So] Source:Gesnerus;71(2):290-307, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9161
[Cp] País de publicação:Switzerland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The distinction between 'mechanical' and 'teleological' has been familiar since Kant; between a fully mechanistic, quantitative science of Nature and a teleological, qualitative approach to living beings, namely 'organisms' understood as purposive or at least functional entities. The beauty of this distinction is that it apparently makes intuitive sense and maps onto historico-conceptual constellations in the life sciences, regarding the status of the body versus that of the machine. I argue that the mechanism-teleology distinction is imprecise and flawed using examples including the 'functional' features present even in Cartesian physiology, the Oxford Physiologists' work on circulation and respiration, the fact that the model of the 'body-machine' is not a mechanistic reduction of organismic properties to basic physical properties but is focused on the uniqueness of organic life; and the concept of 'animal economy' in vitalist medicine, which I present as a 'teleomechanistic' concept of organism (borrowing a term of Lenoir's which he applied to nineteenth-century embryology)--neither mechanical nor teleological.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Filosofia/história
Fisiologia/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
História do Século XVII
Seres Humanos
Vida
Natureza
Vitalismo/história
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1503
[Cu] Atualização por classe:150224
[Lr] Data última revisão:
150224
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; QIS
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:150225
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25168014
[Au] Autor:Gambarotto A
[Ad] Endereço:IHPST, 13, Rue du four, 75006 Paris, France. Electronic address: andrea.gambarotto@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Vital forces and organization: philosophy of nature and biology in Karl Friedrich Kielmeyer.
[So] Source:Stud Hist Philos Biol Biomed Sci;48 Pt A:12-20, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2499
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The historical literature on German life science at the end of the 18th century has tried to rehabilitate eighteenth century vitalism by stressing its difference from Naturphilosophie. Focusing on the work of Karl Friedrich Kielmeyer this paper argues that these positions are based on a historiographical bias and that the clear-cut boundary between German vitalism and Naturphilosophie is historically unattested. On the contrary, they both belong to the process of conceptual genealogy that contributed to the project of a general biology. The latter emerged as the science concerned with the laws that regulate the organization of living nature as a whole. The focus on organization was, at least partially, the result of the debate surrounding the notion of "vital force", which originated in the mid-eighteenth century and caused a shift from a regulative to a constitutive understanding of teleology.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Biologia/história
Vida
Natureza
Filosofia/história
Vitalismo/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Disciplinas das Ciências Biológicas/história
Alemanha
Historiografia
História do Século XVIII
História do Século XIX
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:BIOGRAPHY; HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Ps] Nome de pessoa como assunto:Kielmeyer KF
[Em] Mês de entrada:1507
[Cu] Atualização por classe:141202
[Lr] Data última revisão:
141202
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140830
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 176 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:25081834
[Au] Autor:Wolfe CT
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Philosophy and Moral Sciences, Sarton Centre for History of Science, Ghent University, Blandijnberg 2, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: charles.wolfe@ugent.be.
[Ti] Título:The organism as ontological go-between: hybridity, boundaries and degrees of reality in its conceptual history.
[So] Source:Stud Hist Philos Biol Biomed Sci;48 Pt B:151-61, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2499
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The organism is neither a discovery like the circulation of the blood or the glycogenic function of the liver, nor a particular biological theory like epigenesis or preformationism. It is rather a concept which plays a series of roles--sometimes overt, sometimes masked--throughout the history of biology, and frequently in very normative ways, also shifting between the biological and the social. Indeed, it has often been presented as a key-concept in life science and the 'theorization' of Life, but conversely has also been the target of influential rejections: as just an instrument of transmission for the selfish gene, but also, historiographically, as part of an outdated 'vitalism'. Indeed, the organism, perhaps because it is experientially closer to the 'body' than to the 'molecule', is often the object of quasi-affective theoretical investments presenting it as essential, sometimes even as the pivot of a science or a particular approach to nature, while other approaches reject or attack it with equal force, assimilating it to a mysterious 'vitalist' ontology of extra-causal forces, or other pseudo-scientific doctrines. This paper does not seek to adjudicate between these debates, either in terms of scientific validity or historical coherence; nor does it return to the well-studied issue of the organism-mechanism tension in biology. Recent scholarship has begun to focus on the emergence and transformation of the concept of organism, but has not emphasized so much the way in which organism is a shifting, 'go-between' concept-invoked as 'natural' by some thinkers to justify their metaphysics, but then presented as value-laden by others, over and against the natural world. The organism as go-between concept is also a hybrid, a boundary concept or an epistemic limit case, all of which partly overlap with the idea of 'nomadic concepts'. Thereby the concept of organism continues to function in different contexts--as a heuristic, an explanatory challenge, a model of order, of regulation, etc.--despite having frequently been pronounced irrelevant and reduced to molecules or genes. Yet this perpetuation is far removed from any 'metaphysics of organism', or organismic biology.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Disciplinas das Ciências Biológicas
Formação de Conceito
Vida
Filosofia
Vitalismo
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Disciplinas das Ciências Biológicas/história
Biologia/história
História do Século XIX
História do Século XX
História do Século XXI
Metafísica/história
Filosofia/história
Vitalismo/história
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1507
[Cu] Atualização por classe:141201
[Lr] Data última revisão:
141201
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:140802
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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