Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : I01.076.201.208 [Categoria DeCS]
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  1 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29415021
[Au] Autor:Azzazy MF
[Ad] Endereço:Surveys of Natural Resources Department, Environmental Studies and Research Institute University of Sadat City, Sadat City, Egypt.
[Ti] Título:Exploratory palynological studies at the Tell el-Daba'a-Avaris archaeological site.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0180770, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:A palynological study of samples collected from the Tell el-Daba'a (Avaris) archaeological site, the capital of the Hyksos located in the Northeastern Nile Delta, Egypt, was conducted. A range of samples were analyzed for pollen content: mudbricks from tomb walls dating from the Middle (cal. 2124-1778 BC) and New Kingdom ages (cal. 1550-1750 BC), kitchen remains dating from the Middle Kingdom, kitchen middens from the 19th Dynasty (cal. 1750-1058 BC), and tomb offering jars from the Late Period (cal.1000-600 BC). Floristic composition of modern vegetation analysis at different habitats revealed four community types and nine associated types, providing an indicator of high soil salinity and moisture content. Cereal and Achillea-type pollen were common in the mudbrick samples, indicating the probable use of these plants as temper during mudbrick manufacturing in the Middle and New Kingdoms. The kitchen samples were dominated by cereals, broad bean, celery, and other weed pollen types, indicating the importance of cereals, legumes, and celery as strategic crops for food or medicines during the Middle Kingdom period. Weed pollen types were probably associated with crops, with "Cheno-am" pollen type recorded at highest abundance in the tomb filling jar, which may indicate the use of these aromatic herbs to repel insects and animals from tombs.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Arqueologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Egito
Geologia
Plantas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0180770


  2 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29446561
[Au] Autor:Riede F; Johannsen NN; Högberg A; Nowell A; Lombard M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Archaeology and Heritage Studies, Aarhus University Moesgård, Denmark.
[Ti] Título:The role of play objects and object play in human cognitive evolution and innovation.
[So] Source:Evol Anthropol;27(1):46-59, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6505
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In this contribution, we address a major puzzle in the evolution of human material culture: If maturing individuals just learn their parental generation's material culture, then what is the origin of key innovations as documented in the archeological record? We approach this question by coupling a life-history model of the costs and benefits of experimentation with a niche-construction perspective. Niche-construction theory suggests that the behavior of organisms and their modification of the world around them have important evolutionary ramifications by altering developmental settings and selection pressures. Part of Homo sapiens' niche is the active provisioning of children with play objects - sometimes functional miniatures of adult tools - and the encouragement of object play, such as playful knapping with stones. Our model suggests that salient material culture innovation may occur or be primed in a late childhood or adolescence sweet spot when cognitive and physical abilities are sufficiently mature but before the full onset of the concerns and costs associated with reproduction. We evaluate the model against a series of archeological cases and make suggestions for future research.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Biológica
Cognição
Criatividade
Jogos e Brinquedos
Tecnologia/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Arqueologia
Criança
História Antiga
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/evan.21555


  3 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29446560
[Au] Autor:Hosfield R; Cole J; McNabb J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Archaeology, School of Archaeology, Geography & Environmental Science, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6AB, UK.
[Ti] Título:Less of a bird's song than a hard rock ensemble.
[So] Source:Evol Anthropol;27(1):9-20, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6505
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Corbey et al. (2016) propose that the Acheulean handaxe was, at least in part, under genetic control. An alternative perspective is offered here, focusing on the nature of the Acheulean handaxe and the archaeological record, and re-emphasizing their status as cultural artefacts. This is based on four main arguments challenging the proposals of Corbey et al. Firstly, handaxes do not have to track environmental variation to be a cultural artefact, given their role as a hand-held butchery knife or multi-purpose tool. Secondly, while handaxe shapes do cluster around a basic bauplan, there is also significant variability in the Acheulean handaxe record, characterized by site-specific modal forms and locally expressed, short-lived, idiosyncratic traits. Critically, this variability occurs in both time and space, is multi-scalar, and does not appear to be under genetic control. Thirdly, handaxes were produced in social contexts, within which their makers grew up exposed to the sights and sounds of artefact manufacture. Finally, the localized absences of handaxes at different times and places in the Lower Paleolithic world is suggestive of active behavioral choices and population dynamics rather than genetic controls.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Hominidae/fisiologia
Tecnologia/história
Comportamento de Utilização de Ferramentas/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: África
Animais
Arqueologia
Europa (Continente)
Feminino
História Antiga
Seres Humanos
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/evan.21551


  4 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29446559
[Au] Autor:Wynn T; Gowlett J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anthropology, Center for Cognitive Archaeology, University of Colorado.
[Ti] Título:The handaxe reconsidered.
[So] Source:Evol Anthropol;27(1):21-29, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6505
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The Acheulean handaxe is one of the longest-known and longest-surviving artifacts of the Palaeolithic and, despite its experimentally tested functionality, is often regarded as puzzling. It is unnecessary to invoke a unique-for-mammals genetic mechanism to explain the handaxe phenomenon. Instead, we propose that two nongenetic processes are sufficient. The first is a set of ergonomic design principles linked to the production of sturdy, hand-held cutting tools in the context of a knapped-stone technology that lacked hafting. The second is an esthetic preference for regular forms with gradual curves and pleasing proportions. Neither process is a cultural meme but, operating together in a cultural context, they can account for all of the supposedly puzzling time-space patterns presented by handaxes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Ergonomia/história
Estética/história
Hominidae/fisiologia
Tecnologia/história
Comportamento de Utilização de Ferramentas/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Arqueologia
História Antiga
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/evan.21552


  5 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28460196
[Au] Autor:Warinner C; Herbig A; Mann A; Fellows Yates JA; Weiß CL; Burbano HA; Orlando L; Krause J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena 07745, Germany; email: warinner@shh.mpg.de.
[Ti] Título:A Robust Framework for Microbial Archaeology.
[So] Source:Annu Rev Genomics Hum Genet;18:321-356, 2017 Aug 31.
[Is] ISSN:1545-293X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Microbial archaeology is flourishing in the era of high-throughput sequencing, revealing the agents behind devastating historical plagues, identifying the cryptic movements of pathogens in prehistory, and reconstructing the ancestral microbiota of humans. Here, we introduce the fundamental concepts and theoretical framework of the discipline, then discuss applied methodologies for pathogen identification and microbiome characterization from archaeological samples. We give special attention to the process of identifying, validating, and authenticating ancient microbes using high-throughput DNA sequencing data. Finally, we outline standards and precautions to guide future research in the field.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Archaea/isolamento & purificação
Bactérias/isolamento & purificação
DNA Antigo/análise
Metagenômica/métodos
Microbiota/genética
Análise de Sequência de DNA/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Archaea/genética
Arqueologia/métodos
Bactérias/genética
Genoma Arqueal
Genoma Bacteriano
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Ancient)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180228
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180228
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1146/annurev-genom-091416-035526


  6 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29370188
[Au] Autor:Mosquera M; Ollé A; Rodríguez-Álvarez XP; Carbonell E
[Ad] Endereço:Àrea de Prehistòria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Avinguda de Catalunya 35, Tarragona, Spain.
[Ti] Título:Shedding light on the Early Pleistocene of TD6 (Gran Dolina, Atapuerca, Spain): The technological sequence and occupational inferences.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190889, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This paper aims to update the information available on the lithic assemblage from the entire sequence of TD6 now that the most recent excavations have been completed, and to explore possible changes in both occupational patterns and technological strategies evidenced in the unit. This is the first study to analyse the entire TD6 sequence, including subunits TD6.3 and TD6.1, which have never been studied, along with the better-known TD6.2 Homo antecessor-bearing subunit. We also present an analysis of several lithic refits found in TD6, as well as certain technical features that may help characterise the hominin occupations. The archaeo-palaeontological record from TD6 consists of 9,452 faunal remains, 443 coprolites, 1,046 lithic pieces, 170 hominin remains and 91 Celtis seeds. The characteristics of this record seem to indicate two main stages of occupation. In the oldest subunit, TD6.3, the lithic assemblage points to the light and limited hominin occupation of the cave, which does, however, grow over the course of the level. In contrast, the lithic assemblages from TD6.2 and TD6.1 are rich and varied, which may reflect Gran Dolina cave's establishment as a landmark in the region. Despite the occupational differences between the lowermost subunit and the rest of the deposit, technologically the TD6 lithic assemblage is extremely homogeneous throughout. In addition, the composition and spatial distribution of the 12 groups of lithic refits found in unit TD6, as well as the in situ nature of the assemblage demonstrate the high degree of preservation at the site. This may help clarify the nature of the Early Pleistocene hominin occupations of TD6, and raise reasonable doubt about the latest interpretations that support the ex situ character of the assemblage as a whole.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Hominidae
Paleontologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Arqueologia
Evolução Biológica
Fósseis/história
História Antiga
Seres Humanos
Espanha
Tecnologia/história
Comportamento de Utilização de Ferramentas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180213
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180213
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180126
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190889


  7 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29293573
[Au] Autor:McPherron SP
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Human Evolution, DeutscherPlatz 6, Leipzig, Germany, 04103.
[Ti] Título:Additional statistical and graphical methods for analyzing site formation processes using artifact orientations.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190195, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The 3D orientation of clasts within a deposit are known to be informative on processes that formed that deposit. In archaeological sites, a portion of the clasts in the deposit are introduced by non-geological processes, and these are typically systematically recorded in archaeological excavations with total stations. By recording a second point on elongated clasts it is possible to quickly and precisely capture their orientation. The statistical and graphical techniques for analyzing these data are well published, and there is a growing set of actualistic and archaeological comparative data to help with the interpretation of the documented patterns. This paper advances this area of research in presenting methods to address some shortcomings in current methodologies. First, a method for calculating confidence intervals on orientation statistics is presented to help address the question of how many objects are needed to assess the formation of a deposit based on orientations. Second, a method for assessing the probability that two assemblages have different orientations is presented based on permutations testing. This method differs from existing ones in that it considers three-dimensional orientations rather than working separately with the two-dimensional bearing and plunge components. Third, a method is presented to examine spatial variability in orientations based on a moving windows approach. The raw data plus the R code to build this document and to implement these methods plus those already described by McPherron are included to help further their use in assessing archaeological site formation processes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Arqueologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Artefatos
Sedimentos Geológicos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180206
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180206
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190195


  8 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29281669
[Au] Autor:Finné M; Holmgren K; Shen CC; Hu HM; Boyd M; Stocker S
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
[Ti] Título:Late Bronze Age climate change and the destruction of the Mycenaean Palace of Nestor at Pylos.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189447, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This paper offers new high-resolution oxygen and carbon isotope data from Stalagmite S1 from Mavri Trypa Cave, SW Peloponnese. Our data provide the climate background to the destruction of the nearby Mycenaean Palace of Nestor at Pylos at the transition from Late Helladic (LH) IIIB to LH IIIC, ~3150-3130 years before present (before AD 1950, hereafter yrs BP) and the subsequent period. S1 is dated by 24 U-Th dates with an averaged precision of ±26 yrs (2σ), providing one of the most robust paleoclimate records from the eastern Mediterranean for the end of the Late Bronze Age (LBA). The δ18O record shows generally wetter conditions at the time when the Palace of Nestor at Pylos was destroyed, but a brief period of drier conditions around 3200 yrs BP may have disrupted the Mycenaean agricultural system that at the time was likely operating close to its limit. Gradually developing aridity after 3150 yrs BP, i.e. subsequent to the destruction, probably reduced crop yields and helped to erode the basis for the reinstitution of a central authority and the Palace itself.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Arqueologia
Mudança Climática
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fósseis
Grécia
Datação Radiométrica
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180129
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180129
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189447


  9 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29281660
[Au] Autor:Leplongeon A
[Ad] Endereço:McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Technological variability in the Late Palaeolithic lithic industries of the Egyptian Nile Valley: The case of the Silsilian and Afian industries.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0188824, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:During the Nubia Salvage Campaign and the subsequent expeditions from the 1960's to the 1980's, numerous sites attributed to the Late Palaeolithic (~25-15 ka) were found in the Nile Valley, particularly in Nubia and Upper Egypt. This region is one of the few to have allowed human occupations during the dry Marine Isotope Stage 2 and is therefore key to understanding how human populations adapted to environmental changes at this time. This paper focuses on two sites located in Upper Egypt, excavated by the Combined Prehistoric Expedition: E71K18, attributed to the Afian industry and E71K20, attributed to the Silsilian industry. It aims to review the geomorphological and chronological evidence of the sites, present a technological analysis of the lithic assemblages in order to provide data that can be used in detailed comparative studies, which will allow discussion of technological variability in the Late Palaeolithic of the Nile Valley and its place within the regional context. The lithic analysis relies on the chaîne opératoire concept combined with an attribute analysis to allow quantification. This study (1) casts doubts on the chronology of E71K18 and related Afian industry, which could be older or younger than previously suggested, highlights (2) distinct technological characteristics for the Afian and the Silsilian, as well as (3) similar technological characteristics which allow to group them under a same broad techno-cultural complex, distinct from those north or south of the area.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Arqueologia
Indústrias
Tecnologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Egito
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180129
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180129
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188824


  10 / 2995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29281652
[Au] Autor:McAlister A; Allen MS
[Ad] Endereço:Anthropology, School of Social Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
[Ti] Título:Basalt geochemistry reveals high frequency of prehistoric tool exchange in low hierarchy Marquesas Islands (Polynesia).
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0188207, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Exchange activities, formal or otherwise, serve a variety of purposes and were prominent in many Pacific Island societies, both during island settlement and in late prehistory. Recent Polynesian studies highlight the role of exchange in the region's most hierarchical polities where it contributed to wealth economies, emergent leadership, and status rivalry in late prehistory. Building on this research, we hypothesized that exchange in low hierarchy chiefdoms (kin-based polities where there are distinctions between commoners and elites but ranking within the latter is lacking, weak, or ephemeral) would differ in frequency and function from that associated with strongly hierarchical polities. We address this hypothesis through geochemical, morphological, and distributional analyses of stone tools on Nuku Hiva, Marquesas Islands. Non-destructive Energy-Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and destructive Wavelength-Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) analyses of 278 complete and broken tools (adzes, chisels, preforms) from four valleys identify use of stone from at least seven sources on three islands: five on Nuku Hiva and one each on Eiao and Ua Pou. A functional analysis demonstrates that no tool form is limited to a particular source, while inter-valley distributions reveal that the proportions of non-local or extra-valley tools (43 to 94%, mean = 77%) approximate or exceed results from other archipelagoes, including those from elite and ritual sites of Polynesian archaic states. Intra-valley patterns also are unexpected, with non-local stone tools being recovered from both elite and commoner residential areas in near-equal proportions. Our findings unambiguously demonstrate the importance of exchange in late prehistoric Marquesan society, at varied social and geographic scales. We propose the observed patterns are the result of elites using non-local tools as political currency, aimed at reinforcing status, cementing client-patron relations, and building extra-valley alliances, consistent with prestige societies elsewhere and early historic accounts from the Marquesan Islands.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Arqueologia
Silicatos/química
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Geografia
Seres Humanos
Polinésia
Espectrometria de Fluorescência/métodos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Silicates); 0 (basalt)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180129
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180129
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188207



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