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[PMID]:29193692
[Au] Autor:Sanganyado E; Teta C; Masiri B
[Ad] Endereço:Marine Biology Institute, Shantou University, Shantou, Guangdong Province, China.
[Ti] Título:Impact of African traditional worldviews on climate change adaptation.
[So] Source:Integr Environ Assess Manag;14(2):189-193, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1551-3793
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Recent studies show cultural worldviews are a key determinant of environmental risk perceptions; thus, they could influence climate change adaptation strategies. African traditional worldviews encourage harmony between humans and the environment through a complex metaphysical belief system transmitted through folklore, taboos, and traditional knowledge. However, African traditional worldviews hold a belief in traditional gods that was shown to have a low connectedness to nature and a low willingness to change. In Makueni District, Kenya, 45% of agropastoralists surveyed believed drought was god's plan and could not be changed. In contrast, traditional knowledge, which is shaped by African traditional worldviews, is often used to frame adaptive strategies such as migration, changing modes of production, and planting different crop varieties. Furthermore, traditional knowledge has been used as a complement to science in areas where meteorological data was unavailable. However, the role of African traditional worldviews on climate change adaption remains understudied. Hence, there is a need to systematically establish the influence of African traditional worldviews on climate change risk perception, development of adaptive strategies, and policy formulation and implementation. In this commentary, we discuss the potential impacts of African traditional worldviews on climate change adaptation. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2018;14:189-193. © 2018 SETAC.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mudança Climática
Conservação dos Recursos Naturais/métodos
Cultura
Política Ambiental
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: África
Secas
Meio Ambiente
Monitoramento Ambiental
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ieam.2010


  2 / 30003 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28459763
[Au] Autor:Pappas D; Fogler J; Sargado S; Welchons L; Augustyn M
[Ad] Endereço:*Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; †Children's Physicians of South Texas, Driscoll Children's Hospital, Corpus Christi, Texas; ‡The Kelberman Center, Utica, NY; §Department of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.
[Ti] Título:International/Institutional Trauma in Developmental Pediatric Practice.
[So] Source:J Dev Behav Pediatr;38(4):292-293, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1536-7312
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:CASE: "Aabis" is a school-aged boy from a predominantly conservative Muslim nation who presented to a tertiary developmental-behavioral pediatric (DBP) clinic to seek "expert opinion" for significant social and learning difficulties in the context of a history of frequent falling and "clumsiness." He was seen by a psychiatrist in his home country, who ordered an electroencephalogram and "brain map" (both normal), and received occupational and physical therapies. Frequent tantrums and intense emotional reactions to minor events-revealed to be related to a history of repeated physical beatings from groups of his "friends"-prompted referral to the DBP clinic. When asked why he did not fight back, Aabis said that he did not want to lose his friends. He and his parents further explained that this kind of organized aggression is considered part of normative development in their country and that Aabis needed to "toughen up."Aabis was described by his parents as being very "sensitive" when others raised their voices, shivering when reprimanded and profusely apologizing for real and imagined mistakes. He bit his nails until they bled, washed his hands repetitively, and changed his clothes several times per day. On witnessing his parents arguing, Aabis threatened to harm himself with a decorative knife.The assessment presented with several procedural complications specifically the use of an interpreter and the cultural differences regarding many of the topics discussed. Aabis spoke very little English, and an interpreter was not available in person on the initial day of the assessment. Telephonic phone translation services were attempted, but there were concerns that Aabis would not feel comfortable with sharing his emotions over the phone with an unidentified individual. As feared, Aabis was resistant to discuss emotionally charged topics (e.g., feeling sad, being bullied, hearing or seeing things) and grew impatient and irritated with the phone interpreter. After some unsuccessful experimentation with a Google-based translation system (implemented at Aabi's request to help build comfort and rapport), a second telephonic interpreter was brought into the session, who Aabis later described to his parents as "mean." (Aabis clarified that the second interpreter had been brusque and insensitive to his tentative attempts to express his feelings, e.g., by telling him to "Speak up. Spit it out.")Toward the end of the interview, Aabis seemed to dissociate and insisted anxiously that he did not want to relay certain information without his parents present in the room. What would you do next in this situation?Details about this case, including name and age, have been altered to protect the child's identity.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Árabes/psicologia
Bullying
Transtornos Dissociativos/diagnóstico
Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/diagnóstico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Criança
Cultura
Transtornos Dissociativos/etnologia
Transtornos Dissociativos/psicologia
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/etnologia
Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/psicologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/DBP.0000000000000443


  3 / 30003 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29173742
[Au] Autor:Wei C; Eisenberg RE; Ramos-Olazagasti MA; Wall M; Chen C; Bird HR; Canino G; Duarte CS
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center/New York State Psychiatric Institute (CUMC/NYSPI), New York.
[Ti] Título:Developmental Psychopathology in a Racial/Ethnic Minority Group: Are Cultural Risks Relevant?
[So] Source:J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry;56(12):1081-1088.e1, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1527-5418
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: The current study examined (a) the mediating role of parenting behaviors in the relationship between parental risks and youth antisocial behaviors (YASB), and (b) the role of youth cultural stress in a racial/ethnic minority group (i.e., Puerto Rican [PR] youth). METHOD: This longitudinal study consisted of 3 annual interviews of PR youth (N = 1,150; aged 10-14 years at wave 1) and their caretakers from the South Bronx (SB) in New York City and from San Juan, Puerto Rico. Parents reported on parental risks, parenting behaviors, and YASB. Youth also self-reported on YASB and youth cultural stress. A lagged structural equation model examined the relationship between these variables across 3 yearly waves, with youth cultural stress as a moderator of the association between effective parenting behaviors and YASB. RESULTS: Findings supported the positive influence of effective parenting on YASB, independently of past parental risks and past YASB: higher effective parenting significantly predicted lower YASB at the following wave. Parenting also accounted for (mediated) the association between the composite of parental risks and YASB. Youth cultural stress at wave 1 was cross-sectionally associated with higher YASB and moderated the prospective associations between effective parenting and YASB, such that for youth who perceived higher cultural stress, the positive effect of effective parenting on YASB was weakened compared to those with lower/average cultural stress. CONCLUSION: Among PR families, both parental and cultural risk factors influence YASB. Such findings should be considered when treating racial/ethnic minority youth for whom cultural factors may be a relevant influence on determining behaviors.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Transtorno da Conduta/etnologia
Cultura
Hispano-Americanos/psicologia
Grupos Minoritários/psicologia
Poder Familiar/psicologia
Assunção de Riscos
Estresse Psicológico/etnologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Transtorno da Conduta/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Modelos Psicológicos
Modelos Estatísticos
Cidade de Nova Iorque
Estudos Prospectivos
Porto Rico/etnologia
Estresse Psicológico/psicologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  4 / 30003 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27770601
[Au] Autor:Azevedo LF; Sampaio R; Camila Dias C; Romão J; Lemos L; Agualusa L; Vaz-Serra S; Patto T; Costa-Pereira A; Castro-Lopes JM
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Health Information and Decision Sciences (CIDES), Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
[Ti] Título:Portuguese Version of the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory: A Multicenter Validation Study.
[So] Source:Pain Pract;17(6):808-819, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1533-2500
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: We aimed to perform the translation, cultural adaptation, and validation of the Pain Beliefs and Perceptions Inventory (PBPI) for the European Portuguese language and chronic pain population. METHODS: This is a longitudinal multicenter validation study. A Portuguese version of the PBPI (PBPI-P) was created through a process of translation, back translation, and expert panel evaluation. The PBPI-P was administered to a total of 122 patients from 13 chronic pain clinics in Portugal, at baseline and after 7 days. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed by Cronbach's alpha (α) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Construct (convergent and discriminant) validity was assessed based on a set of previously developed theoretical hypotheses about interrelations between the PBPI-P and other measures. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed to test the theoretical structure of the PBPI-P. RESULTS: The internal consistency and test-retest reliability coefficients for each respective subscale were α = 0.620 and ICC = 0.801 for mystery; α = 0.744 and ICC = 0.841 for permanence; α = 0.778 and ICC = 0.791 for constancy; and α = 0.764 and ICC = 0.881 for self-blame. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure (performance, constancy, self-blame, and mystery) that explained 63% of the variance. The construct validity of the PBPI-P was shown to be adequate, with more than 90% of the previously defined hypotheses regarding interrelations with other measures confirmed. CONCLUSION: The PBPI-P has been shown to be adequate and to have excellent reliability, internal consistency, and validity. It may contribute to a better pain assessment and is suitable for research and clinical use.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Dor Crônica/diagnóstico
Dor Crônica/epidemiologia
Cultura
Medição da Dor/normas
Traduções
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Dor Crônica/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Medição da Dor/métodos
Percepção da Dor/fisiologia
Portugal/epidemiologia
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
Inquéritos e Questionários
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; VALIDATION STUDIES
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180301
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180301
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161023
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/papr.12529


  5 / 30003 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28468920
[Au] Autor:Creanza N; Kolodny O; Feldman MW
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235-1634, USA nicole.creanza@vanderbilt.edu.
[Ti] Título:Greater than the sum of its parts? Modelling population contact and interaction of cultural repertoires.
[So] Source:J R Soc Interface;14(130), 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1742-5662
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Evidence for interactions between populations plays a prominent role in the reconstruction of historical and prehistoric human dynamics; these interactions are usually interpreted to reflect cultural practices or demographic processes. The sharp increase in long-distance transportation of lithic material between the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic, for example, is seen as a manifestation of the cultural revolution that defined the transition between these epochs. Here, we propose that population interaction is not only a reflection of cultural change but also a potential driver of it. We explore the possible effects of inter-population migration on cultural evolution when migrating individuals possess core technological knowledge from their original population. Using a computational framework of cultural evolution that incorporates realistic aspects of human innovation processes, we show that migration can lead to a range of outcomes, including punctuated but transient increases in cultural complexity, an increase of cultural complexity to an elevated steady state and the emergence of a positive feedback loop that drives ongoing acceleration in cultural accumulation. Our findings suggest that population contact may have played a crucial role in the evolution of hominin cultures and propose explanations for observations of Palaeolithic cultural change whose interpretations have been hotly debated.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cultura
Modelos Teóricos
Dinâmica Populacional
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Antropologia Cultural
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  6 / 30003 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28054495
[Au] Autor:Ré AHN; Logan SW; Cattuzzo MT; Henrique RS; Tudela MC; Stodden DF
[Ad] Endereço:a Physical Education and Health , University of São Paulo , Sao Paulo , Brazil.
[Ti] Título:Comparison of motor competence levels on two assessments across childhood.
[So] Source:J Sports Sci;36(1):1-6, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1466-447X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This study compared performances and motor delay classifications for the Test of Gross Motor Development-2nd edition (TGMD-2) and the Körperkoordinationstest Für Kinder (KTK) in a sample of 424 healthy children (47% girls) between 5 and 10 years of age. Low-to-moderate correlations (r range = 0.34-0.52) were found between assessments across age. In general, both boys and girls demonstrated higher raw scores across age groups. However, percentile scores indicated younger children outperformed older children, denoting a normative percentile-based decrease in motor competence (MC) in the older age groups. In total, the TGMD-2 and KTK classified 39.4% and 18.4% children, respectively, as demonstrating very low MC (percentile ≤5). In conclusion, the TGMD-2 classified significantly more children with motor delays than the KTK and the differences between children's motor skill classification levels by these assessments became greater as the age groups increased. Therefore, the TGMD-2 may demonstrate more susceptibility to sociocultural influences and be more influenced by cumulative motor experiences throughout childhood. Low-to-moderate correlations between assessments also suggest the TGMD-2 and KTK may measure different aspects of MC. As such, it may be important to use multiple assessments to comprehensively assess motor competence.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Desenvolvimento Infantil/fisiologia
Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/classificação
Destreza Motora/fisiologia
Testes Neuropsicológicos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fatores Etários
Brasil
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Estudos Transversais
Cultura
Deficiências do Desenvolvimento/diagnóstico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Fatores Sexuais
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/02640414.2016.1276294


  7 / 30003 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29320542
[Au] Autor:Matisoo-Smith E; Gosling AL; Platt D; Kardailsky O; Prost S; Cameron-Christie S; Collins CJ; Boocock J; Kurumilian Y; Guirguis M; Pla Orquín R; Khalil W; Genz H; Abou Diwan G; Nassar J; Zalloua P
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
[Ti] Título:Ancient mitogenomes of Phoenicians from Sardinia and Lebanon: A story of settlement, integration, and female mobility.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190169, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The Phoenicians emerged in the Northern Levant around 1800 BCE and by the 9th century BCE had spread their culture across the Mediterranean Basin, establishing trading posts, and settlements in various European Mediterranean and North African locations. Despite their widespread influence, what is known of the Phoenicians comes from what was written about them by the Greeks and Egyptians. In this study, we investigate the extent of Phoenician integration with the Sardinian communities they settled. We present 14 new ancient mitogenome sequences from pre-Phoenician (~1800 BCE) and Phoenician (~700-400 BCE) samples from Lebanon (n = 4) and Sardinia (n = 10) and compare these with 87 new complete mitogenomes from modern Lebanese and 21 recently published pre-Phoenician ancient mitogenomes from Sardinia to investigate the population dynamics of the Phoenician (Punic) site of Monte Sirai, in southern Sardinia. Our results indicate evidence of continuity of some lineages from pre-Phoenician populations suggesting integration of indigenous Sardinians in the Monte Sirai Phoenician community. We also find evidence of the arrival of new, unique mitochondrial lineages, indicating the movement of women from sites in the Near East or North Africa to Sardinia, but also possibly from non-Mediterranean populations and the likely movement of women from Europe to Phoenician sites in Lebanon. Combined, this evidence suggests female mobility and genetic diversity in Phoenician communities, reflecting the inclusive and multicultural nature of Phoenician society.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Demografia
Grupos Étnicos/história
Genoma Mitocondrial
Migração Humana/história
Mulheres
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Criança
Cultura
DNA Mitocondrial/análise
DNA Mitocondrial/isolamento & purificação
Grupos Étnicos/genética
Feminino
Variação Genética
Haplótipos
História Antiga
Seres Humanos
Itália
Líbano/etnologia
Região do Mediterrâneo
Filogenia
Dinâmica Populacional
Dente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Mitochondrial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190169


  8 / 30003 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29314805
[Au] Autor:Radojcic L; Divac-Jovanovic M
[Ti] Título:Redefinition of gender roles and fertility problems.
[So] Source:Vojnosanit Pregl;73(7):690-4, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:0042-8450
[Cp] País de publicação:Serbia
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cultura
Identidade de Gênero
Infertilidade/psicologia
Casamento/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Feminino
Seres Humanos
Infertilidade/terapia
Masculino
Sérvia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180213
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180213
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180110
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 30003 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29304166
[Au] Autor:Su B; Koda N; Martens P
[Ad] Endereço:International Centre for Integrated Assessment and Sustainable Development (ICIS), Maastricht University, MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Título:How Japanese companion dog and cat owners' degree of attachment relates to the attribution of emotions to their animals.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190781, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Recently, studies in the United States and European countries have shown that the degree of attachment is associated with the attribution of emotions to companion animals. These studies imply that investigating the degree of attachment to companion animals is a good way for researchers to explore animal emotions and then improve animal welfare. Although a promising area of study, in Japan, no empirical studies have examined the correlation between the degree of attachment and the attribution of emotions to companion animals. In this research, we aimed to assess companion animal owners' attribution of six primary (anger, joy, sadness, disgust, fear and surprise) and four secondary (shame, jealousy, disappointment and compassion) emotions to their dogs and cats, as well as how the degree of attachment related to such attribution of emotions from a Japanese cultural perspective. The "Pet Bonding Scale" (PBS), which is used to determine the level of bonding between humans and animals, was introduced to measure respondents' degree of attachment to their companion animals. The results of a questionnaire (N = 546) distributed throughout Japan showed that respondents attributed a wide range of emotions to their animals. Companion animals' primary emotions, compared to secondary emotions, were more commonly attributed by their owners. The attribution of compassion and jealousy was reported at a high level (73.1% and 56.2%, respectively), which was surprising as compassion and jealousy are generally defined as secondary emotions. All participants were highly attached to their companion animals, and this attachment was positively associated with the attribution of emotions (9/10) to companion animals (all p < 0.05). This study is one of the first to investigate animal emotions by analyzing the bonding between companion animals and owners in Japan, and it can therefore provide knowledge to increase Japanese people's awareness of animal welfare.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Vínculo Homem-Animal de Estimação
Gatos
Cães
Emoções
Percepção
Animais de Estimação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Gatos/psicologia
Cultura
Cães/psicologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Japão
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Animais de Estimação/psicologia
Inquéritos e Questionários
Teoria da Mente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180205
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180205
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190781


  10 / 30003 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28457164
[Au] Autor:Bou Khalil R
[Ad] Endereço:From the Department of Psychiatry, Saint Joseph University, and the Department of Psychiatry, Hotel Dieu de France, Beirut, Lebanon.
[Ti] Título:On the Magical Thinking Related to Mental Health in Chad.
[So] Source:Am J Psychiatry;174(5):427-428, 2017 May 01.
[Is] ISSN:1535-7228
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cultura
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Saúde Mental
Esquizofrenia/tratamento farmacológico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Antipsicóticos/uso terapêutico
Chade
Haloperidol/uso terapêutico
Seres Humanos
Esquizofrenia/diagnóstico
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antipsychotic Agents); J6292F8L3D (Haloperidol)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180205
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180205
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.16101159



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