Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : I01.240.600.525 [Categoria DeCS]
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  1 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29320542
[Au] Autor:Matisoo-Smith E; Gosling AL; Platt D; Kardailsky O; Prost S; Cameron-Christie S; Collins CJ; Boocock J; Kurumilian Y; Guirguis M; Pla Orquín R; Khalil W; Genz H; Abou Diwan G; Nassar J; Zalloua P
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
[Ti] Título:Ancient mitogenomes of Phoenicians from Sardinia and Lebanon: A story of settlement, integration, and female mobility.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190169, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The Phoenicians emerged in the Northern Levant around 1800 BCE and by the 9th century BCE had spread their culture across the Mediterranean Basin, establishing trading posts, and settlements in various European Mediterranean and North African locations. Despite their widespread influence, what is known of the Phoenicians comes from what was written about them by the Greeks and Egyptians. In this study, we investigate the extent of Phoenician integration with the Sardinian communities they settled. We present 14 new ancient mitogenome sequences from pre-Phoenician (~1800 BCE) and Phoenician (~700-400 BCE) samples from Lebanon (n = 4) and Sardinia (n = 10) and compare these with 87 new complete mitogenomes from modern Lebanese and 21 recently published pre-Phoenician ancient mitogenomes from Sardinia to investigate the population dynamics of the Phoenician (Punic) site of Monte Sirai, in southern Sardinia. Our results indicate evidence of continuity of some lineages from pre-Phoenician populations suggesting integration of indigenous Sardinians in the Monte Sirai Phoenician community. We also find evidence of the arrival of new, unique mitochondrial lineages, indicating the movement of women from sites in the Near East or North Africa to Sardinia, but also possibly from non-Mediterranean populations and the likely movement of women from Europe to Phoenician sites in Lebanon. Combined, this evidence suggests female mobility and genetic diversity in Phoenician communities, reflecting the inclusive and multicultural nature of Phoenician society.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Demografia
Grupos Étnicos/história
Genoma Mitocondrial
Migração Humana/história
Mulheres
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Criança
Cultura
DNA Mitocondrial/análise
DNA Mitocondrial/isolamento & purificação
Grupos Étnicos/genética
Feminino
Variação Genética
Haplótipos
História Antiga
Seres Humanos
Itália
Líbano/etnologia
Região do Mediterrâneo
Filogenia
Dinâmica Populacional
Dente
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Mitochondrial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190169


  2 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28748526
[Au] Autor:Allen KG; von Cramon-Taubadel N
[Ad] Endereço:Buffalo Human Evolutionary Morphology Lab, Department of Anthropology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, 14261.
[Ti] Título:A craniometric analysis of early modern Romania and Hungary: The roles of migration and conversion in shaping European Ottoman population history.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;164(3):477-487, 2017 11.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: Debate persists regarding the biological makeup of European Ottoman communities settled during the expansion of the Ottoman Empire during the 16th and 17th centuries, and the roles of conversion and migration in shaping demography and population history. The aim of this study was to perform an assessment of the biological affinities of three European Ottoman series based on craniometric data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Craniometric data collected from three Ottoman series from Hungary and Romania were compared to European and Anatolian comparative series, selected to represent biological affinity representative of historically recorded migration and conversion influences. Sex-separated samples were analyzed using D -matrices, along with principal coordinates and PERMANOVA analyses to investigate biological affinities. Discriminant function analysis was employed to assign Ottoman individuals to two potential classes: European or Anatolian. RESULTS: Affinity analyses show larger than expected biological differences between males and females within each of the Ottoman communities. Discriminant function analyses show that the majority of Ottoman individuals could be classified as either European or Anatolian with a high probability. Moreover, location within Europe proved influential, as the Ottomans from a location of more geopolitical importance (Budapest) diverged from more hinterland communities in terms of biological affinity patterns. DISCUSSION: The results suggest that male and female Ottomans may possess distinct population histories, with males and females divergent from each other in terms of their biological affinities. The Ottoman communities appear diverse in terms of constituting a mix of peoples from different biological backgrounds. The greater distances between sexes from the same community, and the differences between communities, may be evidence that the processes of migration and conversion impacted individual people and groups diversely.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cefalometria/métodos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/etnologia
Migração Humana/história
Crânio/anatomia & histologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Antropologia Física
Feminino
História do Século XVI
História do Século XVII
História do Século XX
Seres Humanos
Hungria/etnologia
Masculino
Império Otomano/etnologia
Romênia/etnologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23287


  3 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29265666
[Au] Autor:Hoffecker JF; Hoffecker IT
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, 80309-0450.
[Ti] Título:Technological complexity and the global dispersal of modern humans.
[So] Source:Evol Anthropol;26(6):285-299, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6505
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Anatomically modern humans (Homo sapiens) dispersed out of Africa roughly 120,000 years ago and again after 75,000 years ago. The early dispersal was geographically restricted to the Arabian Peninsula, Levant, and possibly parts of southern Asia. The later dispersal was ultimately global in scope, including areas not previously occupied by Homo. One explanation for the contrast between the two out-of-Africa dispersals is that the modern humans who expanded into Eurasia 120,000 years ago lacked the functionally and structurally complex technology of recent hunter-gatherers. This technology, which includes, for example, mechanical projectiles, snares and traps, and sewn clothing, provides not only expanded dietary breadth and increased rates of foraging efficiency and success in places where plant and animal productivity is low, but protection from cold weather in places where winter temperatures are low. The absence of complex technology before 75,000 years ago also may explain why modern humans in the Levant did not develop sedentary settlements and agriculture 120,000 years ago (i.e., during the Last Interglacial).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Vestuário/história
Migração Humana/história
Tecnologia/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: África
Agricultura/história
Antropologia
Ásia
Australásia
Cavernas
Evolução Cultural/história
Dieta Paleolítica
Europa (Continente)
História Antiga
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180108
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180108
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171222
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/evan.21553


  4 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29265661
[Au] Autor:O'Brien MJ; Buchanan B
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Texas A&M University-San Antonio.
[Ti] Título:Cultural learning and the Clovis colonization of North America.
[So] Source:Evol Anthropol;26(6):270-284, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6505
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The timing of the earliest colonization of North America is debatable, but what is not at issue is the point of origin of the early colonists: Humans entered the continent from Beringia and then made their way south along or near the Pacific Coast and/or through a corridor that ran between the Cordilleran and Laurentide ice sheets in western North America. At some point, they abandoned their Arctic-based tool complex for one more adapted to an entirely different environment. That new techno-complex is termed "Clovis"; its dispersal allows us to examine, at a fine scale, how colonization processes played out across a vast continent that at the time had, at best, a very small resident population. Clovis has figured prominently in American archeology since the first Clovis points were identified in eastern New Mexico in the 1930s. However, the successful marriage of learning models grounded in evolutionary theory and modern analytical methods that began roughly a decade ago has begun to pay significant dividends in terms of what we know about the rapid spread of human groups across the last sizable landmass to witness human occupation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Cultural/história
Migração Humana
Índios Norte-Americanos/etnologia
Aprendizado Social
Tecnologia/história
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Antropologia
História Antiga
Seres Humanos
América do Norte
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180108
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180108
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171222
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/evan.21550


  5 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29027332
[Au] Autor:Harris EE
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Biological Sciences and Geology, Queensborough Community College, City University of New York, Medical Arts Building, M-213, 222-05, 56th Avenue Bayside, NY, 1136411364.
[Ti] Título:Demic and cultural diffusion in prehistoric Europe in the age of ancient genomes.
[So] Source:Evol Anthropol;26(5):228-241, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6505
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Ancient genomes can help us detect prehistoric migrations, population contractions, and admixture among populations. Knowing the dynamics of demography is invaluable for understanding culture change in prehistory, particularly the roles played by demic and cultural diffusion in transformations of material cultures. Prehistoric Europe is a region where ancient genome analyses can help illuminate the interplay between demography and culture change. In Europe, there is more archeological evidence, in terms of detailed studies, radiometric dates, and explanatory hypotheses that can be evaluated, than in any other region of the world. Here I show some important ways that ancient genomes have given us insights into population movements in European prehistory. I also propose that studies might be increasingly focused on specific questions of culture change, for example in evaluating the makers of "transitional" industries as well as the origins of the Gravettian and spread of the Magdalenian. I also discuss genomic evidence supporting the large role that demic expansion has played in the Neolithization of Europe and the formation of the European population during the Bronze Age.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Evolução Cultural
Genoma Humano/genética
Migração Humana
Dinâmica Populacional
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Antropologia Física
Evolução Biológica
DNA Antigo
Europa (Continente)
Seres Humanos
Metagenômica
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Ancient)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171019
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171019
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171014
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/evan.21545


  6 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28859608
[Au] Autor:Melegh BI; Banfai Z; Hadzsiev K; Miseta A; Melegh B
[Ad] Endereço:University of Pecs, Szentagothai Research Centre, Ifjusag Road 20, Pecs, H-7624, Hungary.
[Ti] Título:Refining the South Asian Origin of the Romani people.
[So] Source:BMC Genet;18(1):82, 2017 Aug 31.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2156
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND:  Recent genetic studies based on genome-wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data further investigated the history of Roma and suggested that the source of South Asian ancestry in Roma originates most likely from the Northwest region of India. METHODS: In this study, based also on genome-wide SNP data, we attempted to refine these findings using significantly larger number of European Roma samples, an extended dataset of Indian groups and involving Pakistani groups into the analyses. Our Roma data contained 179 Roma samples. Our extended Indian data consisted of 51 distinct Indian ethnic groups, which provided us a higher resolution of the population living on the Indian subcontinent. We used in this study principal component analysis and other ancestry estimating methods for the study of population relationships, several formal tests of admixture and an improved algorithm for investigating shared IBD segments in order to investigate the main sources of Roma ancestry. RESULTS: According to our analyses, Roma showed significant IBD sharing of 0.132 Mb with Northwest Indian ethnic groups. The most significant IBD sharings included ethnic groups of Punjab, Rajasthan and Gujarat states. However, we found also significant IBD sharing of 0.087 Mb with ethnic groups living in Pakistan, such as Balochi, Brahui, Burusho, Kalash, Makrani, Pashtun and Sindhi. CONCLUSION: Our results show that Northwest India could play an important role in the South Asian ancestry of Roma, however, the origin of Romani people might include the area of Pakistan as well.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Migração Humana
Roma (Grupo Étnico)/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Europa (Continente)
Fluxo Gênico
Genética Médica
Genoma Humano
Seres Humanos
Análise de Sequência com Séries de Oligonucleotídeos
Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único
Roma (Grupo Étnico)/etnologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171103
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171103
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170902
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12863-017-0547-x


  7 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28837655
[Au] Autor:Hollfelder N; Schlebusch CM; Günther T; Babiker H; Hassan HY; Jakobsson M
[Ad] Endereço:Dept. of Organismal Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
[Ti] Título:Northeast African genomic variation shaped by the continuity of indigenous groups and Eurasian migrations.
[So] Source:PLoS Genet;13(8):e1006976, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7404
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Northeast Africa has a long history of human habitation, with fossil-finds from the earliest anatomically modern humans, and housing ancient civilizations. The region is also the gate-way out of Africa, as well as a portal for migration into Africa from Eurasia via the Middle East and the Arabian Peninsula. We investigate the population history of northeast Africa by genotyping ~3.9 million SNPs in 221 individuals from 18 populations sampled in Sudan and South Sudan and combine this data with published genome-wide data from surrounding areas. We find a strong genetic divide between the populations from the northeastern parts of the region (Nubians, central Arab populations, and the Beja) and populations towards the west and south (Nilotes, Darfur and Kordofan populations). This differentiation is mainly caused by a large Eurasian ancestry component of the northeast populations likely driven by migration of Middle Eastern groups followed by admixture that affected the local populations in a north-to-south succession of events. Genetic evidence points to an early admixture event in the Nubians, concurrent with historical contact between North Sudanese and Arab groups. We estimate the admixture in current-day Sudanese Arab populations to about 700 years ago, coinciding with the fall of Dongola in 1315/1316 AD, a wave of admixture that reached the Darfurian/Kordofanian populations some 400-200 years ago. In contrast to the northeastern populations, the current-day Nilotic populations from the south of the region display little or no admixture from Eurasian groups indicating long-term isolation and population continuity in these areas of northeast Africa.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: DNA Mitocondrial/genética
Genética Populacional
Migração Humana
Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: África
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/genética
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética
Fósseis
Genoma Humano
Genômica
Genótipo
Haplótipos/genética
Seres Humanos
Oriente Médio
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Mitochondrial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170924
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170924
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170825
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pgen.1006976


  8 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28815964
[Au] Autor:Sugiyama Y
[Ad] Endereço:Professor Emeritus, Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University.
[Ti] Título:Sex-biased dispersal of human ancestors.
[So] Source:Evol Anthropol;26(4):172-180, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6505
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Some anthropologists and primatologists have argued that, judging by extant chimpanzees and humans, which are female-biased dispersers, the common ancestors of humans and chimpanzees were also female-biased dispersers. It has been thought that sex-biased dispersal patterns have been genetically transmitted for millions of years. However, this character has changed many times with changes in environment and life-form during human evolution and historical times. I examined life-form and social organization of nonhuman primates, among them gatherers (foragers), hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists, industrialists, and modern and extant humans. I conclude that dispersal patterns changed in response to environmental conditions during primate and human evolution.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Distribuição Animal/fisiologia
Evolução Biológica
Comportamento de Retorno ao Território Vital/fisiologia
Pan troglodytes/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Migração Humana
Seres Humanos
Indústrias
Masculino
Fatores Sexuais
Comportamento Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170906
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170906
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170818
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/evan.21539


  9 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28799977
[Au] Autor:Squires A
[Ad] Endereço:Allison Squires is an associate professor at Rory Meyers College of Nursing at New York University in New York, N.Y. She's also a member of the board of the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care.
[Ti] Título:Evidence-based approaches to breaking down language barriers.
[So] Source:Nursing;47(9):34-40, 2017 09.
[Is] ISSN:1538-8689
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Barreiras de Comunicação
Comunicação
Prática Clínica Baseada em Evidências/métodos
Linguagem
Relações Enfermeiro-Paciente
Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem no Hospital/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Migração Humana
Seres Humanos
Pesquisa em Avaliação de Enfermagem
Pesquisa Metodológica em Enfermagem
Avaliação de Resultados da Assistência ao Paciente
Readmissão do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos
Melhoria de Qualidade
Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
Tradução
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171030
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171030
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170812
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/01.NURSE.0000522002.60278.ca


  10 / 666 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28782792
[Au] Autor:Yao HB; Tang S; Yao X; Yeh HY; Zhang W; Xie Z; Du Q; Ma L; Wei S; Gong X; Zhang Z; Li Q; Xu B; Zhang HQ; Chen G; Wang CC
[Ad] Endereço:Key Laboratory of Evidence Science of Gansu Province, Gansu Institute of Political Science and Law, Lanzhou, 730070, China.
[Ti] Título:The genetic admixture in Tibetan-Yi Corridor.
[So] Source:Am J Phys Anthropol;164(3):522-532, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1096-8644
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: The Tibetan-Yi Corridor located on the eastern edge of Tibetan Plateau is suggested to be the key region for the origin and diversification of Tibeto-Burman speaking populations and the main route of the peopling of the Plateau. However, the genetic history of the populations in the Corridor is far from clear due to limited sampling in the northern part of the Corridor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We collected blood samples from 10 Tibetan and 10 Han Chinese individuals from Gansu province and genotyped about 600,000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). RESULTS: Our data revealed that the populations in the Corridor are all admixed on a genetic cline of deriving ancestry from Tibetans on the Plateau and surrounding lowland East Asians. The Tibetan and Han Chinese groups in the north of the Plateau show significant evidence of low-level West Eurasian admixture that could be probably traced back to 600∼900 years ago. DISCUSSION: We conclude that there have been huge population migrations from surrounding lowland onto the Tibetan Plateau via the Tibetan-Yi Corridor since the initial formation of Tibetans probably in Neolithic Time, which leads to the current genetic structure of Tibeto-Burman speaking populations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/genética
Fluxo Gênico/genética
Deriva Genética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Antropologia Física
Feminino
Genética Populacional
Migração Humana
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética
Tibet
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171030
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171030
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170808
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23291



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