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[PMID]:29408920
[Au] Autor:Dumas SE; Kassa L; Young SL; Travis AJ
[Ad] Endereço:Master of Public Health program, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Examining the association between livestock ownership typologies and child nutrition in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191339, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between livestock ownership and dietary diversity, animal-source food consumption, height-for-age z-score, and stunting among children living in wildlife "buffer zones" of Zambia's Luangwa Valley using a novel livestock typology approach. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 838 children aged 6-36 months. Households were categorized into typologies based on the types and numbers of animals owned, ranging from no livestock to large numbers of mixed livestock. We used multilevel mixed-effects linear and logistic regression to examine the association between livestock typologies and four nutrition-related outcomes of interest. Results were compared with analyses using more common binary and count measures of livestock ownership. RESULTS: No measure of livestock ownership was significantly associated with children's odds of animal-source food consumption, child height-for-age z-score, or stunting odds. Livestock ownership Type 2 (having a small number of poultry) was surprisingly associated with decreased child dietary diversity (ß = -0.477; p<0.01) relative to owning no livestock. Similarly, in comparison models, chicken ownership was negatively associated with dietary diversity (ß = -0.320; p<0.01), but increasing numbers of chickens were positively associated with dietary diversity (ß = 0.022; p<0.01). Notably, neither child dietary diversity nor animal-source food consumption was significantly associated with height, perhaps due to unusually high prevalences of morbidities. CONCLUSIONS: Our novel typologies methodology allowed for an efficient and a more in-depth examination of the differential impact of livestock ownership patterns compared to typical binary or count measures of livestock ownership. We found that these patterns were not positively associated with child nutrition outcomes in this context. Development and conservation programs focusing on livestock must carefully consider the complex, context-specific relationship between livestock ownership and nutrition outcomes-including how livestock are utilized by the target population-when attempting to use livestock as a means of improving child nutrition.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fenômenos Fisiológicos da Nutrição Infantil
Gado
Propriedade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Criança
Estudos Transversais
Seres Humanos
Zâmbia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191339


  2 / 7938 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29440600
[Ti] Título:Protecting equine vets from work injuries.
[So] Source:Vet Rec;182(6):156, 2018 02 10.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Promoção da Saúde/métodos
Cavalos
Traumatismos Ocupacionais/prevenção & controle
Médicos Veterinários
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal
Cavalos/psicologia
Seres Humanos
Propriedade
Reino Unido
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:NEWS
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180307
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180307
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29247000
[Au] Autor:Gregory B
[Ad] Endereço:Hale Veterinary Group, 33 Union Street, Melksham, Wiltshire SN12 7PR.
[Ti] Título:Who owns the countryside?
[So] Source:Vet Rec;181(24):661, 2017 12 16.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Meio Ambiente
Propriedade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180223
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180223
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.j5780


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[PMID]:29222154
[Au] Autor:Wilkinson W
[Ad] Endereço:Grazely Vets, 12 Guildford Road, Farnborough, Hampshire GU14 6PU.
[Ti] Título:Who owns the countryside?
[So] Source:Vet Rec;181(23):630-631, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Meio Ambiente
Propriedade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180223
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180223
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171210
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.j5671


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[PMID]:29192046
[Au] Autor:Simmons A
[Ad] Endereço:Vinces, Barrington, Ilminster, Somerset TA19 0JB.
[Ti] Título:Who owns the countryside?
[So] Source:Vet Rec;181(22):598, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Meio Ambiente
Propriedade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180223
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180223
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.j5448


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[PMID]:29393924
[Au] Autor:Kerins JL; Koske SE; Kazmierczak J; Austin C; Gowdy K; Dibernardo A; Seoul Virus Working Group; Canadian Seoul Virus Investigation Group (Federal); Canadian Seoul Virus Investigation Group (Provincial); Contributors
[Ti] Título:Outbreak of Seoul Virus Among Rats and Rat Owners - United States and Canada, 2017.
[So] Source:MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep;67(4):131-134, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1545-861X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In December 2016, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (WDHS) notified CDC of a patient hospitalized with fever, leukopenia, elevated transaminases, and proteinuria. The patient owned and operated an in-home rattery, or rat-breeding facility, with approximately 100 Norway rats, primarily bred as pets. A family member developed similar symptoms 4 weeks later, but was not hospitalized. Because both patients were known to have rodent contact, they were tested for hantavirus infections. In January 2017, CDC confirmed recent, acute Seoul virus infection in both patients. An investigation was conducted to identify additional human and rat infections and prevent further transmission. Ultimately, the investigation identified 31 facilities in 11 states with human and/or rat Seoul virus infections; six facilities also reported exchanging rats with Canadian ratteries. Testing of serum samples from 183 persons in the United States and Canada identified 24 (13.1%) with Seoul virus antibodies; three (12.5%) were hospitalized and no deaths occurred. This investigation, including cases described in a previously published report from Tennessee (1), identified the first known transmission of Seoul virus from pet rats to humans in the United States and Canada. Pet rat owners should practice safe rodent handling to prevent Seoul virus infection (2).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Surtos de Doenças
Febre Hemorrágica com Síndrome Renal/epidemiologia
Febre Hemorrágica com Síndrome Renal/veterinária
Doenças dos Roedores/epidemiologia
Vírus Seoul/isolamento & purificação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Canadá/epidemiologia
Surtos de Doenças/veterinária
Seres Humanos
Propriedade
Ratos
Doenças dos Roedores/virologia
Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm6704a5


  7 / 7938 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29191434
[Au] Autor:Scheiring G; Stefler D; Irdam D; Fazekas M; Azarova A; Kolesnikova I; Köllo J; Popov V; Szelenyi I; Marmot M; Murphy M; McKee M; Bobak M; King L
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. Electronic address: gs385@cam.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:The gendered effects of foreign investment and prolonged state ownership on mortality in Hungary: an indirect demographic, retrospective cohort study.
[So] Source:Lancet Glob Health;6(1):e95-e102, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2214-109X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Research on the health outcomes of globalisation and economic transition has yielded conflicting results, partly due to methodological and data limitations. Specifically, the outcomes of changes in foreign investment and state ownership need to be examined using multilevel data, linking macro-effects and micro-effects. We exploited the natural experiment offered by the Hungarian economic transition by means of a multilevel study designed to address these gaps in the scientific literature. METHODS: For this indirect demographic, retrospective cohort study, we collected multilevel data related to Hungary between 1995 and 2004 from the PrivMort database and other sources at the town, company, and individual level to assess the relation between the dominant company ownership of a town and mortality. We grouped towns into three ownership categories: dominant state, domestic private, and foreign ownership. We did population surveys in these towns to collect data on vital status and other characteristics of survey respondents' relatives. We assessed the relation between dominant ownership and mortality at the individual level. We used discrete-time survival modelling, adjusting for town-level and individual-level confounders, with clustered SEs. FINDINGS: Of 83 eligible towns identified, we randomly selected 52 for inclusion in the analysis and analysed ownership data from 262 companies within these towns. Additionally, between June 16, 2014, and Dec 22, 2014, we collected data on 78 622 individuals from the 52 towns, of whom 27 694 were considered eligible. After multivariable adjustment, we found that women living in towns with prolonged state ownership had significantly lower odds of dying than women living in towns dominated by domestic private ownership (odds ratio [OR] 0·74, 95% CI 0·61-0·90) or by foreign investment (OR 0·80, 0·69-0·92). INTERPRETATION: Prolonged state ownership was associated with protection of life chances during the post-socialist transformation for women. The indirect economic benefits of foreign investment do not translate automatically into better health without appropriate industrial and social policies. FUNDING: The European Research Council.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde
Internacionalidade
Investimentos em Saúde
Mortalidade/tendências
Propriedade/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Hungria/epidemiologia
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Análise Multinível
Estudos Retrospectivos
Distribuição por Sexo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29293578
[Au] Autor:Ayah R
[Ad] Endereço:School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi, KNH, Nairobi, Kenya.
[Ti] Título:Scaling up implementation of ART: Organizational culture and early mortality of patients initiated on ART in Nairobi, Kenya.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190344, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Scaling up the antiretroviral (ART) program in Kenya has involved a strategy of using clinical guidelines coupled with decentralization of treatment sites. However decentralization pushes clinical responsibility downwards to health facilities run by lower cadre staff. Whether the organizational culture in health facilities affects the outcomes despite the use of clinical guidelines has not been explored. This study aimed to demonstrate the relationship between organizational culture and early mortality and those lost to follow up (LTFU) among patients enrolled for HIV care. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A stratified sample of 31 health facilities in Nairobi County offering ART services were surveyed. Data of patients enrolled on ART and LTFU for the 12 months ending 30th June 2013 were abstracted. Mortality and LTFU were determined and used to rank health facilities. In the facilities with the lowest and highest mortality and LTFU key informant interviews were conducted using a tool adapted from team climate assessment measurement questionnaire and competing value framework tool to assess organizational culture. The strength of association between early mortality, LTFU and organizational culture was tested. RESULTS: Half (51.8%) of the 5,808 patients enrolled into care in 31 health facilities over the 12-month study period were started on ART. Of these 48 (1.6% 95% CI 0.8%-2.4%) died within three months of starting treatment, while a further 125 (4.2% 95% CI 2.1%-6.6%) were LTFU giving an attrition rate of 5.7% (95% CI 3.3%-8.6%). Tuberculosis was the most common comorbidity associated with high early mortality and high LTFU. Organizational culture, specifically an adhocratic type was found to be associated with low early mortality and low LTFU of patients enrolled for HIV care (P = 0.034). CONCLUSION: The use of ART clinical guidelines in a decentralized health systems are not sufficient to achieve required service delivery outcomes. The attrition rate above would mean 85,000 Kenyans missing care based on current HIV disease burden figures. Deliberate efforts to improve individual health facility leadership and inculcate an adhocratic culture may lower mortality and morbidity associated with initiating ART.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fármacos Anti-HIV/uso terapêutico
Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico
Cultura Organizacional
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Infecções por HIV/mortalidade
Instalações de Saúde
Seres Humanos
Quênia/epidemiologia
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Propriedade
Estudos Retrospectivos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Anti-HIV Agents)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180215
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180215
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190344


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[PMID]:29293532
[Au] Autor:Macridis S; Johnston N; Johnson S; Vallance JK
[Ad] Endereço:Alberta Centre for Active Living, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
[Ti] Título:Consumer physical activity tracking device ownership and use among a population-based sample of adults.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0189298, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Consumer physical activity tracking devices (PATs) have gained popularity to support individuals to be more active and less sedentary throughout the day. Wearable PATs provide real-time feedback of various fitness-related metrics such as tracking steps, sedentary time, and distance walked. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of PAT ownership and use among a population-based sample of adults. A representative sample of adults ≥18 years (N = 1,215) from Alberta, Canada were recruited through random-digit dialing and responded to a questionnaire via computer-assisted telephone interviewing methods in summer 2016. Questionnaires assessed demographic and health behaviour variables, and items were designed to assess PAT ownership and usage. Logistic regression analysis (odds ratios) was used to assess correlates of PAT ownership and use. On average, participants (N = 1,215) were 53.9 (SD 16.7) years and 50.1% were female. Of the sample, 19.6% (n = 238) indicated they currently own and use a PAT. Participants who owned a PAT wore their device on average 23.2 days within the past month. Currently owning a PAT was significantly associated with being female (OR = 1.41, CI: 1.10 to 1.82), being <60 years of age (OR = 1.86, CI: 1.37 to 2.53), having at least some post secondary education (OR = 1.88, CI: 1.36 to 2.60), having a BMI ≥25 (OR = 1.52, CI: 1.16 to 1.99), and meeting physical activity guidelines (OR = 1.45, CI: 1.12 to 1.88). Similar correlates emerged for PAT use. Correlates significantly associated with PAT use and ownership included being female, being less than 60 years of age, having a post-secondary education, meeting physical activity guidelines, and being overweight/obese. This is the first study to examine characteristics of PAT ownership and use among Canadian adults.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento do Consumidor
Exercício
Propriedade
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Alberta
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Modelos Logísticos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180215
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180215
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189298


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[PMID]:29365282
[Au] Autor:Desai S; McWilliams JM
[Ad] Endereço:From the Department of Population Health, New York University, New York (S.D.); and the Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School (S.D., J.M.M.), and the Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Brigham and Women's Hospital (J.M.M.) - both in Boston.
[Ti] Título:Consequences of the 340B Drug Pricing Program.
[So] Source:N Engl J Med;378(6):539-548, 2018 02 08.
[Is] ISSN:1533-4406
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The 340B Drug Pricing Program entitles qualifying hospitals to discounts on outpatient drugs, increasing the profitability of drug administration. By tying the program eligibility of hospitals to their Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) adjustment percentage, which reflects the proportion of hospitalized patients who are low-income, the program is intended to expand resources for underserved populations but provides no direct incentives for hospitals to use financial gains to enhance care for low-income patients. METHODS: We used Medicare claims and a regression-discontinuity design, taking advantage of the threshold for program eligibility among general acute care hospitals (DSH percentage, >11.75%), to isolate the effects of the program on hospital-physician consolidation (i.e., acquisition of physician practices or employment of physicians by hospitals) and on the outpatient administration of parenteral drugs by hospital-owned facilities in three specialties in which parenteral drugs are frequently used. For low-income patients, we also assessed the effects of the program on the provision of care by hospitals and on mortality. RESULTS: Hospital eligibility for the 340B Program was associated with 2.3 more hematologist-oncologists practicing in facilities owned by the hospital, or 230% more hematologist-oncologists than expected in the absence of the program (P=0.02), and with 0.9 (or 900%) more ophthalmologists per hospital (P=0.08) and 0.1 (or 33%) more rheumatologists per hospital (P=0.84). Program eligibility was associated with significantly higher numbers of parenteral drug claims billed by hospitals for Medicare patients in hematology-oncology (90% higher, P=0.001) and ophthalmology (177% higher, P=0.03) but not rheumatology (77% higher, P=0.12). Program eligibility was associated with lower proportions of low-income patients in hematology-oncology and ophthalmology and with no significant differences in hospital provision of safety-net or inpatient care for low-income groups or in mortality among low-income residents of the hospitals' local service areas. CONCLUSIONS: The 340B Program has been associated with hospital-physician consolidation in hematology-oncology and with more hospital-based administration of parenteral drugs in hematology-oncology and ophthalmology. Financial gains for hospitals have not been associated with clear evidence of expanded care or lower mortality among low-income patients. (Funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and others.).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Custos de Medicamentos
Economia Hospitalar
Convênios Médico-Hospitalares/estatística & dados numéricos
Medicare Part B/economia
Pobreza
Mecanismo de Reembolso
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Custos e Análise de Custo
Hematologia
Hospitais/estatística & dados numéricos
Seres Humanos
Oncologia
Mortalidade
Oftalmologia
Propriedade
Provedores de Redes de Segurança/economia
Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1056/NEJMsa1706475



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