Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : I01.880.735.820 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 30 [refinar]
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[PMID]:28749369
[Au] Autor:Casey JA; Morello-Frosch R; Mennitt DJ; Fristrup K; Ogburn EL; James P
[Ad] Endereço:Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars Program, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley , California, USA.
[Ti] Título:Race/Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status, Residential Segregation, and Spatial Variation in Noise Exposure in the Contiguous United States.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;125(7):077017, 2017 07 25.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Prior research has reported disparities in environmental exposures in the United States, but, to our knowledge, no nationwide studies have assessed inequality in noise pollution. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to ) assess racial/ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in noise pollution in the contiguous United States; and ) consider the modifying role of metropolitan level racial residential segregation. METHODS: We used a geospatial sound model to estimate census block group­level median (L ) nighttime and daytime noise exposure and 90th percentile (L ) daytime noise exposure. Block group variables from the 2006­2010 American Community Survey (ACS) included race/ethnicity, education, income, poverty, unemployment, homeownership, and linguistic isolation. We estimated associations using polynomial terms in spatial error models adjusted for total population and population density. We also evaluated the relationship between race/ethnicity and noise, stratified by levels of metropolitan area racial residential segregation, classified using a multigroup dissimilarity index. RESULTS: Generally, estimated nighttime and daytime noise levels were higher for census block groups with higher proportions of nonwhite and lower-socioeconomic status (SES) residents. For example, estimated nighttime noise levels in urban block groups with 75% vs. 0% black residents were 46.3 A-weighted decibels (dBA) [interquartile range (IQR): 44.3­47.8 dBA] and 42.3 dBA (IQR: 40.4­45.5 dBA), respectively. In urban block groups with 50% vs. 0% of residents living below poverty, estimated nighttime noise levels were 46.9 dBA (IQR: 44.7­48.5 dBA) and 44.0 dBA (IQR: 42.2­45.5 dBA), respectively. Block groups with the highest metropolitan area segregation had the highest estimated noise exposures, regardless of racial composition. Results were generally consistent between urban and suburban/rural census block groups, and for daytime and nighttime noise and robust to different spatial weight and neighbor definitions. CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic differences in model-based estimates of noise exposure throughout the United States. Additional research is needed to determine if differences in noise exposure may contribute to health disparities in the United States. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP898
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Exposição Ambiental
Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde
Ruído
Segregação Social
Fatores Socioeconômicos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Estudos Transversais
Grupos Étnicos
Seres Humanos
Modelos Teóricos
Distribuição Espacial da População
Classe Social
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180206
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180206
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1289/EHP898


  2 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28748507
[Au] Autor:Pais J
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Sociology, University of Connecticut, 344 Mansfield Road, Unit 2068, Storrs, CT, 06269-2068, USA. jeremy.pais@uconn.edu.
[Ti] Título:Intergenerational Neighborhood Attainment and the Legacy of Racial Residential Segregation: A Causal Mediation Analysis.
[So] Source:Demography;54(4):1221-1250, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1533-7790
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Advances in mediation analysis are used to examine the legacy effects of racial residential segregation in the United States on neighborhood attainments across two familial generations. The legacy effects of segregation are anticipated to operate through two primary pathways: a neighborhood effects pathway and an urban continuity pathway. The neighborhood effects pathway explains why parent's exposure to racial residential segregation during their family-rearing years can influence the residential outcomes of their children later in life. The urban continuity pathway captures the temporal consistency of the built and topographical environment in providing similar residential opportunities across generations. Findings from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and U.S. Census data indicate that the legacy effect of racial residential segregation among black families operates primarily through the neighborhood effects that influence children growing up. For white families, there is less support for the legacy effects of segregation. The findings are supported by a comprehensive mediation analysis that provides a formal sensitivity analysis, deploys an instrumental variable, and assesses effect heterogeneity. Knowledge of the legacy of segregation moves neighborhood attainment research beyond point-in-time studies of racial residential segregation to provide a deeper understanding into the ways stratified residential environments are reproduced.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos
Renda/estatística & dados numéricos
Distribuição Espacial da População/estatística & dados numéricos
Segregação Social/tendências
População Urbana/tendências
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Afroamericanos
Meio Ambiente
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu
Seres Humanos
Meio Social
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180205
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180205
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13524-017-0597-8


  3 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28683655
[Au] Autor:Jarvis B; Kawalerowicz J; Valdez S
[Ad] Endereço:The Institute for Analytical Sociology, Linköping University, Sweden.
[Ti] Título:Impact of ancestry categorisations on residential segregation measures using Swedish register data.
[So] Source:Scand J Public Health;45(17_suppl):62-65, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1651-1905
[Cp] País de publicação:Sweden
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:AIM: Country-of-birth data contained in registers are often aggregated to create broad ancestry group categories. We examine how measures of residential segregation vary according to levels of aggregation. METHOD: We use Swedish register data to calculate pairwise dissimilarity indices from 1990 to 2012 for ancestry groups defined at four nested levels of aggregation: (1) micro-groups containing 50 categories, (2) meso-groups containing 16 categories, (3) macro-groups containing six categories and (4) a broad Western/non-Western binary. RESULTS: We find variation in segregation levels between ancestry groups that is obscured by data aggregation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that the practice of aggregating country-of-birth statistics in register data can hinder the ability to identify highly segregated groups and therefore design effective policy to remedy both intergroup and intergenerational inequalities.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Grupos Populacionais/estatística & dados numéricos
Distribuição Espacial da População/estatística & dados numéricos
Segregação Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Sistema de Registros
Suécia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170728
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170728
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170708
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/1403494817702341


  4 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28505341
[Au] Autor:Kershaw KN; Robinson WR; Gordon-Larsen P; Hicken MT; Goff DC; Carnethon MR; Kiefe CI; Sidney S; Diez Roux AV
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
[Ti] Título:Association of Changes in Neighborhood-Level Racial Residential Segregation With Changes in Blood Pressure Among Black Adults: The CARDIA Study.
[So] Source:JAMA Intern Med;177(7):996-1002, 2017 Jul 01.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6114
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Importance: Despite cross-sectional evidence linking racial residential segregation to hypertension prevalence among non-Hispanic blacks, it remains unclear how changes in exposure to neighborhood segregation may be associated with changes in blood pressure. Objective: To examine the association of changes in neighborhood-level racial residential segregation with changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure over a 25-year period. Design, Setting, and Participants: This observational study examined longitudinal data of 2280 black participants of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, a prospective investigation of adults aged 18 to 30 years who underwent baseline examinations in field centers in 4 US locations from March 25, 1985, to June 7, 1986, and then were re-examined for the next 25 years. Racial residential segregation was assessed using the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic, a measure of SD between the neighborhood's racial composition (ie, percentage of black residents) and the surrounding area's racial composition. Segregation was categorized as high (Gi* >1.96), medium (Gi* 0-1.96), and low (Gi* <0). Fixed-effects linear regression modeling was used to estimate the associations of within-person change in exposure to segregation and within-person change in blood pressure while tightly controlling for time-invariant confounders. Data analyses were performed between August 4, 2016, and February 9, 2017. Main Outcomes and Measures: Within-person changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure across 6 examinations over 25 years. Results: Of the 2280 participants at baseline, 974 (42.7%) were men and 1306 (57.3%) were women. Of these, 1861 (81.6%) were living in a high-segregation neighborhood; 278 (12.2%), a medium-segregation neighborhood; and 141 (6.2%), a low-segregation neighborhood. Systolic blood pressure increased by a mean of 0.16 (95% CI, 0.06-0.26) mm Hg with each 1-SD increase in segregation score after adjusting for interactions of time with age, sex, and field center. Of the 1861 participants (81.6%) who lived in high-segregation neighborhoods at baseline, reductions in exposure to segregation were associated with reductions in systolic blood pressure. Mean differences in systolic blood pressure were -1.33 (95% CI, -2.26 to -0.40) mm Hg when comparing high-segregation with medium-segregation neighborhoods and -1.19 (95% CI, -2.08 to -0.31) mm Hg when comparing high-segregation with low-segregation neighborhoods after adjustment for time and interactions of time with baseline age, sex, and field center. Changes in segregation were not associated with changes in diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions and Relevance: Decreases in exposure to racial residential segregation are associated with reductions in systolic blood pressure. This study adds to the small but growing body of evidence that policies that reduce segregation may have meaningful health benefits.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Exposição Ambiental
Hipertensão
Distribuição Espacial da População
Segregação Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Afroamericanos/estatística & dados numéricos
Determinação da Pressão Arterial/métodos
Determinação da Pressão Arterial/estatística & dados numéricos
Estudos Transversais
Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos
Exposição Ambiental/estatística & dados numéricos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Hipertensão/diagnóstico
Hipertensão/etnologia
Hipertensão/prevenção & controle
Masculino
Meio Social
Estatística como Assunto
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170925
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170925
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170516
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1226


  5 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28426303
[Au] Autor:Krieger N; Waterman PD; Batra N; Murphy JS; Dooley DP; Shah SN
[Ad] Endereço:Nancy Krieger and Pamela D. Waterman are with the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Neelesh Batra, Johnna S. Murphy, Daniel P. Dooley, and Snehal N. Shah are with the Research and Evaluation Office, Boston Public Health Commission,
[Ti] Título:Measures of Local Segregation for Monitoring Health Inequities by Local Health Departments.
[So] Source:Am J Public Health;107(6):903-906, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1541-0048
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: To assess the use of local measures of segregation for monitoring health inequities by local health departments. METHODS: We analyzed preterm birth and premature mortality (death before the age of 65 years) rates for Boston, Massachusetts, for 2010 to 2012, using the Index of Concentration at the Extremes (ICE) and the poverty rate at both the census tract and neighborhood level. RESULTS: For premature mortality at the census tract level, the rate ratios comparing the worst-off and best-off terciles were 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36, 1.83) for the ICE for income, 1.66 (95% CI = 1.43, 1.93) for the ICE for race/ethnicity, and 1.63 (95% CI = 1.40, 1.90) for the ICE combining income and race/ethnicity, as compared with 1.47 (95% CI = 1.27, 1.71) for the poverty measure. Results for the ICE and poverty measures were more similar for preterm births than for premature mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The ICE, a measure of social spatial polarization, may be useful for analyzing health inequities at the local level. Public Health Implications. Local health departments in US cities can meaningfully use the ICE to monitor health inequities associated with racialized economic segregation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos
Saúde Pública
Distribuição Espacial da População/estatística & dados numéricos
Segregação Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Boston
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Grupos de Populações Continentais
Grupos Étnicos
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Recém-Nascido
Meia-Idade
Mortalidade Prematura
Nascimento Prematuro
Fatores Socioeconômicos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170619
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170619
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170421
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2017.303713


  6 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28191650
[Au] Autor:Toolis EE
[Ad] Endereço:University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.
[Ti] Título:Theorizing Critical Placemaking as a Tool for Reclaiming Public Space.
[So] Source:Am J Community Psychol;59(1-2):184-199, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2770
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:As economic inequality and segregation continue to grow in the U.S., psychology has an important role to play in exploring and promoting processes that can disrupt social injustice. This paper identifies the privatization of public space as a social problem that contributes to the entrenchment of social, economic, and racial inequality, and advances "critical placemaking" as a tool for reclaiming public space for public use. Drawing from key concepts in environmental psychology, narrative psychology, and community psychology, the proposed framework seeks to theorize the processes by which placemaking may contribute to transforming community narratives and building more inclusive, participatory, and democratic communities. Policy implications and future directions for empirical work are discussed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Privatização
Problemas Sociais
Segregação Social
Fatores Socioeconômicos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Psicologia Ambiental
Seres Humanos
Teoria Psicológica
Psicologia Social
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171024
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171024
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170214
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajcp.12118


  7 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28129754
[Au] Autor:Belak A; Madarasova Geckova A; van Dijk JP; Reijneveld SA
[Ad] Endereço:Kosice Institute for Society and Health, Faculty of Medicine, P. J. Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia. andrej.belak@upjs.sk.
[Ti] Título:Health-endangering everyday settings and practices in a rural segregated Roma settlement in Slovakia: A descriptive summary from an exploratory longitudinal case study.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;17(1):128, 2017 Jan 28.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Research into social root-causes of poor health within segregated Roma communities in Central and Eastern Europe, i.e. research into how, why and by whom high health-endangering settings and exposures are maintained here, is lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the local setup of health-endangering everyday settings and practices over the long-term in one such community. It is the initial part of a larger longitudinal study qualitatively exploring the social root-causes of poor Roma health status through the case of a particular settlement in Slovakia. METHODS: The study, spanning 10 years, comprised four methodologically distinct phases combining ethnography and applied medical-anthropological surveying. The acquired data consisted of field notes on participant observations and records of elicitations focusing on both the setup and the social root-causes of local everyday health-endangering settings and practices. To create the here-presented descriptive summary of the local setup, we performed a qualitative content analysis based on the latest World Health Organization classification of health exposures. RESULTS: Across all the examined dimensions - material circumstances, psychosocial factors, health-related behaviours, social cohesion and healthcare utilization - all the settlements' residents faced a wide range of health-endangering settings and practices. How the residents engaged in some of these exposures and how these exposures affected residents' health varied according to local social stratifications. Most of the patterns described prevailed over the 10-year period. Some local health-endangering settings and practices were praised by most inhabitants using racialized ethnic terms constructed in contrast or in direct opposition to alleged non-Roma norms and ways. CONCLUSIONS: Our summary provides a comprehensive and conveniently structured basis for grounded thinking about the intermediary social determinants of health within segregated Roma communities in Slovakia and beyond. It offers novel clues regarding how certain determinants might vary therein; how they might be contributing to health-deterioration; and how they might be causally inter-linked here. It also suggests racialized ethnically framed social counter-norms might be involved in the maintenance of analogous exposure setups.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde/etnologia
Nível de Saúde
Roma (Grupo Étnico)/estatística & dados numéricos
População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Estilo de Vida
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Distribuição Espacial da População
Eslováquia
Classe Social
Segregação Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170904
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170904
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170129
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12889-017-4029-x


  8 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27889438
[Au] Autor:Ojinnaka CO; Luo W; Ory MG; McMaughan D; Bolin JN
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX. Electronic address: Ojinnaka@sph.tamhsc.edu.
[Ti] Título:Disparities in Surgical Treatment of Early-Stage Breast Cancer Among Female Residents of Texas: The Role of Racial Residential Segregation.
[So] Source:Clin Breast Cancer;17(2):e43-e52, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1938-0666
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:INTRODUCTION: Early-stage breast cancer can be surgically treated by using mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy, also known as breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Little is known about the association between racial residential segregation, year of diagnosis, and surgical treatment of early-stage breast cancer, and whether racial residential segregation influences the association between other demographic characteristics and disparities in surgical treatment. METHODS: This was a retrospective study using data from the Texas Cancer Registry composed of individuals diagnosed with breast cancer between 1995 and 2012. The dependent variable was treatment using mastectomy or BCT (M/BCT) and the independent variables of interest (IVs) were racial residential segregation and year of diagnosis. The covariates were race, residence, ethnicity, tumor grade, census tract (CT) poverty level, age at diagnosis, stage at diagnosis, and year of diagnosis. Bivariate and multivariable multilevel logistic regression models were estimated. The final sample size was 69,824 individuals nested within 4335 CTs. RESULTS: Adjusting for the IVs and all covariates, there were significantly decreased odds of treatment using M/BCT, as racial residential segregation increased from 0 to 1 (odds ratio [OR] 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.54). There was also an increased likelihood of treatment using M/BCT with increasing year of diagnosis (OR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.13-1.16). A positive interaction effect between racial residential segregation and race was observed (OR 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36-0.88). CONCLUSION: Residents of areas with high indices of racial residential segregation were less likely to be treated with M/BCT. Racial disparities in treatment using M/BCT increased with increasing racial residential segregation.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Neoplasias da Mama/terapia
Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/etnologia
Mastectomia/estatística & dados numéricos
Segregação Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Neoplasias da Mama/patologia
Neoplasias da Mama/radioterapia
Neoplasias da Mama/cirurgia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Mastectomia Segmentar/estatística & dados numéricos
Meia-Idade
Estadiamento de Neoplasias
Radioterapia Adjuvante/estatística & dados numéricos
Sistema de Registros
Estudos Retrospectivos
Texas/etnologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170606
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170606
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161128
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27871213
[Au] Autor:Kwon R; Kposowa A
[Ad] Endereço:a University of California.
[Ti] Título:Shifting racial hierarchies: An analysis of residential segregation among multi-racial and mono-racial groups in the United States.
[So] Source:Popul Stud (Camb);71(1):83-99, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1477-4747
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Multi-racial (mixed-race) people constitute a growing percentage of the United States (US) population. The study reported in this paper used residential segregation measures as a proxy for social distance, to examine whether segregation levels of multi-racial groups differ from those of mono-racial groups in the US in 2010. First, we find that all multi-racial groups considered in the study experience lower levels of segregation at county level than their mono-racial counterparts. However, black-whites and Hispanic-whites experience higher levels of segregation than other multi-racial groups. Second, we find region and minority composition of counties are associated significantly with segregation levels for multi-racial groups, but relative income is not.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Afroamericanos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu
Hispano-Americanos
Distribuição Espacial da População
Segregação Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Censos
Habitação/estatística & dados numéricos
Seres Humanos
Racismo/estatística & dados numéricos
Distribuição Espacial da População/estatística & dados numéricos
Estados Unidos
População Urbana
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171108
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171108
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161123
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/00324728.2016.1254813


  10 / 30 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27874926
[Au] Autor:Ludvigsson JF
[Ad] Endereço:- Stockholm, Sweden - Stockholm, Sweden.
[Ti] Título:[Swedish child health is doing well--but increased segregation and growing health care costs worries].
[Ti] Título:Svensk barnhälsa mår bra - ­ men ökad segregation och ökade sjukvårdskostnader oroar..
[So] Source:Lakartidningen;113, 2016 11 22.
[Is] ISSN:1652-7518
[Cp] País de publicação:Sweden
[La] Idioma:swe
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Serviços de Saúde da Criança
Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Criança
Serviços de Saúde da Criança/economia
Serviços de Saúde da Criança/normas
Serviços de Saúde da Criança/tendências
Custos de Cuidados de Saúde
Seres Humanos
Segregação Social
Suécia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:LETTER
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171011
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171011
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161123
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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