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[PMID]:28466972
[Au] Autor:Madsen T; Sadowa Vedtofte M; Nordentoft M; Ravnborg Nissen L; Bo Andersen S
[Ad] Endereço:Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark.
[Ti] Título:Comparing post-deployment mental health services utilization in soldiers deployed to Balkan, Iraq and Afghanistan.
[So] Source:Acta Psychiatr Scand;135(6):564-572, 2017 06.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0447
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: Insight on how different missions have impacted rates of mental health service (MHS) utilization is unexplored. We compared postdeployment MHS utilization in a national cohort of first-time deployed to missions in Balkan, Iraq, and Afghanistan respectively. METHODS: A prospective national cohort study of 13 246 first-time deployed in the period 1996 through 2012 to missions in Balkan area, Iraq, or Afghanistan respectively. Soldiers 'MHS utilization was also compared with a 5:1 sex-, age-, and calendar year-matched never-deployed background population. Postdeployment utilization of MHS was retrieved from national coverage registers. Using Cox survival analyses, participants were followed and compared with regard to receiving three different types of psychiatric services: (i) admission to psychiatric hospital, (ii) psychiatric outpatient contact, and (iii) prescriptions of psychotropics. RESULTS: Utilizing of psychiatric outpatient services and psychotropics was significantly higher in first-time deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan compared with deployed to Balkan. However, the rate of postdeployment admission to psychiatric hospital did not differ between missions. Postdeployment rates of psychiatric admission and psychiatric outpatient treatment were significantly higher in Afghanistan-deployed personnel compared with the background population. CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of MHS differed significantly between mission areas and was highest after the latest mission to Afghanistan.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Campanha Afegã de 2001-
Guerra do Iraque 2003-2011
Serviços de Saúde Mental/utilização
Militares/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Península Balcânica
Dinamarca/epidemiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Estimativa de Kaplan-Meier
Masculino
Militares/estatística & dados numéricos
Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais
Estudos Prospectivos
Guerra
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/acps.12736


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[PMID]:29226443
[Au] Autor:Ellenberg E; Taragin MI; Hoffman JR; Cohen O; Luft-Afik D; Bar-On Z; Ostfeld I
[Ad] Endereço:National Insurance Institute of Israel.
[Ti] Título:Lessons From Analyzing the Medical Costs of Civilian Terror Victims: Planning Resources Allocation for a New Era of Confrontations.
[So] Source:Milbank Q;95(4):783-800, 2017 12.
[Is] ISSN:1468-0009
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Policy Points: Across the globe, the threat from terrorist attacks is rising, which requires a careful assessment of long-term medical support. We found 3 major sources of costs: hospital expenditures, mental health services dedicated to acute stress reactions, and ambulatory follow-up. During the first year, most of the costs were related to hospitalization and support for stress relief. During the second year, ambulatory and rehabilitation costs continued to grow. Public health specialists should consider these major components of costs and their evolution over time to properly advise the medical and social authorities on allocating resources for the medical and nonmedical support of civilian casualties resulting from war or terror. CONTEXT: Across the globe, the threat from terrorist attacks is rising, which requires a careful assessment of long-term medical support. Based on an 18-month follow-up of the Israeli civilian population following the 2014 war in Gaza, we describe and analyze the medical costs associated with rocket attacks and review the demography of the victims who filed claims for disability compensation. We then propose practical lessons to help health care authorities prepare for future confrontations. METHOD: Using the National Insurance Institute of Israel's (NII) database, we conducted descriptive and comparative analyses using statistical tests (Fisher's Exact Test, chi-square test, and students' t-tests). The costs were updated until March 30, 2016, and are presented in US dollars. We included only civilian expenses in our analysis. FINDINGS: We identified 5,189 victims, 3,236 of whom presented with acute stress reactions during the conflict. Eighteen months after the conflict, the victims' total medical costs reached $4.4 million. The NII reimbursed $2,541,053 for associated medical costs and $1,921,792 for associated mental health costs. A total of 709 victims filed claims with the NII for further support, including rehabilitation, medical devices, and disability pensions. CONCLUSION: We found 3 major sources of costs: hospital expenditures, mental health services dedicated to acute stress reactions, and ambulatory follow-up. During the first year, most of the costs were related to hospitalization and support for stress relief. During the second year, ambulatory and rehabilitation costs continued to grow. Public health specialists should consider these major components of costs and their evolution over time to properly advise the medical and social authorities on allocating resources for the medical and nonmedical support of civilian casualties resulting from war or terror.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Assistência Ambulatorial/economia
Vítimas de Crime/economia
Vítimas de Crime/estatística & dados numéricos
Custos de Cuidados de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos
Hospitalização/economia
Serviços de Saúde Mental/economia
Centros de Reabilitação/economia
Terrorismo/economia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Assistência Ambulatorial/estatística & dados numéricos
Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos
Seres Humanos
Israel
Serviços de Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos
Centros de Reabilitação/estatística & dados numéricos
Terrorismo/estatística & dados numéricos
Guerra
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171212
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/1468-0009.12299


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[PMID]:29226821
[Au] Autor:Guha-Sapir D; Schlüter B; Rodriguez-Llanes JM; Lillywhite L; Hicks MH
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters, Institute of Health and Society, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: debarati.guha@uclouvain.be.
[Ti] Título:Patterns of civilian and child deaths due to war-related violence in Syria: a comparative analysis from the Violation Documentation Center dataset, 2011-16.
[So] Source:Lancet Glob Health;6(1):e103-e110, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2214-109X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Since March, 2011, the Syrian civil war has lowered life expectancy by as much as 20 years. We describe demographic, spatial, and temporal patterns of direct deaths of civilians and opposition combatants from conflict-related violence in 6 years of war. METHODS: We analysed conflict-related violent deaths with complete information on date, place, and cause of death and demographic group occurring from March 18, 2011, to Dec 31, 2016, recorded by the Violation Documentation Center (VDC). We included civilian and combatant deaths in all Syrian governorates, excluding government-controlled areas. We did not include detainees and missing persons, nor deaths from siege conditions or insufficient medical care. We categorised deaths based on VDC weapon type. We used χ testing to compare deaths from different weapons in civilian men, women, boys, and girls and adult and child combatants. We analysed deaths by governorate and over time. FINDINGS: The VDC recorded 143 630 conflict-related violent deaths with complete information between March 18, 2011, and Dec 31, 2016. Syrian civilians constituted 101 453 (70·6%) of the deaths compared with 42 177 (29·4%) opposition combatants. Direct deaths were caused by wide-area weapons of shelling and air bombardments in 58 099 (57·3%) civilians, including 8285 (74·6%) civilian women and 13 810 (79·4%) civilian children, and in 4058 (9·6%) opposition combatants. Proportions of children among civilian deaths increased from 8·9% (388 of 4254 civilian deaths) in 2011 to 19·0% (4927 of 25 972) in 2013 and to 23·3% (2662 of 11 444) in 2016. Of 7566 deaths from barrel bombs, 7351 (97·2%) were civilians, of whom 2007 (27·3%) were children. Of 20 281 deaths by execution, 18 747 (92·4%) were civilians and 1534 (7·6%) were opposition combatants. Compared with opposition child soldiers who were male (n=333), deaths of civilian male children (n=11 730) were caused more often by air bombardments (39·2% vs 5·4%, p<0·0001) and shelling (37·3% vs 13·2%, p<0·0001) and less often by shooting (12·5% vs 76·0%, p<0·0001). INTERPRETATION: Aerial bombing and shelling rapidly became primary causes of direct deaths of women and children and had disproportionate lethal effects on civilians, calling into question the use of wide-area explosive weapons in urban areas. Increased reliance on aerial bombing by the Syrian Government and international partners is likely to have contributed to findings that children were killed in increasing proportions over time, ultimately comprising a quarter of civilian deaths in 2016. The inordinate proportion of civilians among the executed is consistent with deliberate tactics to terrorise civilians. Deaths from barrel bombs were overwhelmingly civilian rather than opposition combatants, suggesting indiscriminate or targeted warfare contrary to international humanitarian law and possibly constituting a war crime. FUNDING: None.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mortalidade da Criança/tendências
Mortalidade/tendências
Violência/estatística & dados numéricos
Guerra
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Criança
Bases de Dados Factuais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Síria/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171212
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29253366
[Au] Autor:Frost A; Boyle P; Autier P; King C; Zwijnenburg W; Hewitson D; Sullivan R
[Ad] Endereço:Conflict and Health Research Group, King's College London, London, UK; King's Centre for Global Health, King's Health Partners and King's College London, London, UK. Electronic address: alexandra.frost@kcl.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:The effect of explosive remnants of war on global public health: a systematic mixed-studies review using narrative synthesis.
[So] Source:Lancet Public Health;2(6):e286-e296, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2468-2667
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Explosive remnants of war (ERW)-landmines, unexploded ordnance (UXO), and abandoned explosive ordnance (AXO)-have been recognised as a threat to health since the 1990s. We aimed to study the effect of ERW on global public health. METHODS: In this systematic mixed-studies review, we searched the Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed, and ProQuest databases, and hand searched relevant websites, for articles published between Jan 1, 1990, and Aug 31, 2015. We used keywords and Medical Subject Headings related to ERW, landmines, UXO, and AXO to locate original peer-reviewed quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-methods studies in English of the direct physical or psychological effects of ERW on direct victims of the explosive device or reverberating social and economic effects on direct victims and indirect victims (their families and the wider at-risk community). We excluded studies if more than 20% of participants were military, if they were of deminers, if they were from high-income countries, or if they were of chemical weapons. We identified no peer-reviewed studies of AXO effects, so we extended the search to include grey literature. We critically appraised study quality using a mixed methods appraisal tool. We used a narrative synthesis approach to categorise and synthesise the literature. We extracted quantitative data and calculated means and percentages. FINDINGS: The initial search identified 10 226 studies, leaving 8378 (82%) after removal of duplicates, of which we reviewed 54 (26 [48%] were quantitative descriptive studies, 20 [37%] were quantitative non-randomised studies, four [7%] were mixed-methods studies, and four [7%] were grey literature). The direct psychological effects of landmines or UXO appear high. We identified comorbidity of anxiety and depression in landmine or UXO victims in four studies, more women presented with post-traumatic stress disorder than did men in two studies, and landmine or UXO victims reported a greater prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, or depression than did control groups in two studies. Overall injury and mortality rates caused by landmines or UXO decreased over time across five studies and increased in one. More men were injured or killed by landmines or UXO than were women (0-30·6% of women), the mean ages of casualties ranged from 18·5 years to 38·1 years, and victims were likely to be doing an activity of economic necessity at the time of injury. The proportion of casualties of landmines or UXO younger than 18 years ranged from 22% to 55% across twelve studies. Landmine or UXO victims who had one or more limbs amputated ranged from 19·5% to 82·6%. Landmines and UXO had a negative effect on internally displaced populations and returning refugees, physical security, economic productivity, child health and educational attainment, food security, and agriculture in studies from seven countries. We could not establish the proportion of casualties caused by AXO from unplanned explosions at munitions sites, although the grey literature suggests that AXO is a substantial problem. INTERPRETATION: Individually, these landmine and UXO results are not new and substantiate findings from existing research. Taken together, however, these findings provide a picture of the effect of landmines and UXO that stretches far beyond injury and mortality prevalence, making landmine and UXO clearance a more favourable option for funders. AXO effects are understudied and warrant further research. FUNDING: King's College London.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Substâncias Explosivas/efeitos adversos
Saúde Global/estatística & dados numéricos
Guerra
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Narração
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Explosive Agents)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180213
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180213
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  5 / 19095 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29323641
[Au] Autor:Devi S
[Ti] Título:Syria: 7 years into a civil war.
[So] Source:Lancet;391(10115):15-16, 2018 01 06.
[Is] ISSN:1474-547X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde
Guerra
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Administração Financeira
Instalações de Saúde/economia
Instalações de Saúde/provisão & distribuição
Seres Humanos
Socorro em Desastres
Síria
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180212
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180212
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28457990
[Au] Autor:Braun-Lewensohn O; Bar R
[Ad] Endereço:Conflict Management & Resolution Program, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Electronic address: ornabl@bgu.ac.il.
[Ti] Título:Coping and quality of life of soldiers' wives following military operation.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;254:90-95, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] País de publicação:Ireland
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between coping strategies and four dimensions of quality of life (QOL) (physical, psychological, social relations and environment) among military wives. We examined these links six months after the military operation termed Protective Edge. Data were collected from 100 wives (mean age=30.56 SD=5.50) of soldiers who had participated in the military operation and who had been in the front lines. These women filled out self-reported questionnaires including demographics, Brief COPE and WHOQOL-BREF. Results showed that the most prevalent strategy was active coping. Women with no children reported better QOL. Some coping strategies were significantly different in consonance with religiosity and economic status. The demographics and coping scales explained 42%, 23%, 31%, and 28% of the variance of physical, psychological, social and environmental quality of life. The most salient explanatory variables were having children and the maladaptive coping scale. Both of these variables had a negative effect on all scales. The results are discussed based on the stress and coping theory of Lazarus and Folkman.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adaptação Psicológica
Militares/psicologia
Qualidade de Vida/psicologia
Cônjuges/psicologia
Guerra
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adaptação Psicológica/fisiologia
Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Israel/epidemiologia
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180131
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180131
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 19095 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29346375
[Au] Autor:Rivillas JC; Devia Rodriguez R; Song G; Martel A
[Ad] Endereço:Initiative of Research in Health Services and Systems, School of Public Health, University of Valle, Cali, Colombia.
[Ti] Título:How do we reach the girls and women who are the hardest to reach? Inequitable opportunities in reproductive and maternal health care services in armed conflict and forced displacement settings in Colombia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0188654, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: This paper assesses inequalities in access to reproductive and maternal health services among females affected by forced displacement and sexual and gender-based violence in conflict settings in Colombia. This was accomplished through the following approaches: first, we assessed the gaps and gradients in three selected reproductive and maternal health care services. Second, we analyzed the patterns of inequalities in reproductive and maternal health care services and changes over time. And finally, we identified challenges and strategies for reaching girls and women who are the hardest to reach in conflict settings, in order to accelerate progress towards universal health coverage and to contribute to meeting the Sustainable Development Goals of good health and well-being and gender equality by 2030. METHODS: Three types of data were required: data about health outcomes (relating to rates of females affected by conflict), information about reproductive and maternal health care services to provide a social dimension to unmask inequalities (unmet needs in family planning, antenatal care and skilled births attendance); and data on the female population. Data sources used include the National Information System for Social Protection, the National Registry of Victims, the National Administrative Department of Statistics, and Demographic Health Survey at three specific time points: 2005, 2010 and 2015. We estimated the slope index of inequality to express absolute inequality (gaps) and the concentration index to expresses relative inequality (gradients), and to understand whether inequality was eliminated over time. RESULTS: Our findings show that even though absolute health care service-related inequalities dropped over time, relative inequalities worsened or remain unchanged. All summary measures still indicated the existence of inequalities as well as common patterns. Our findings suggest that there is a pattern of marginal exclusion and incremental patterns of inequality in the reproductive and maternal health care service provided to female affected by armed conflict. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the effects of conflict continue to threaten reproductive and maternal health in Colombia, impeding progress towards the realization of universal health care (UHC) and reinforcing already-existing inequities. Key messages and steps forward include the need to understand the two distinct patterns of inequalities identified in this study in order to prompt improved general policy responses. Addressing unmet needs in reproductive and maternal health requires supporting gender equality and prioritizing the girls and women in regions with the highest rates of victims of armed conflict, with the objective of leaving no girl or woman behind. This analysis represents the first attempt to analyze coverage-related inequality in reproductive and maternal health care services for female affected by armed conflict in Colombia. As the World Health Organization and global health systems leaders call for more inclusive engagement, this approach may serve as the key to shaping people-centred health systems. In this particular case, health care facilities must be located in close proximity to girls and women in conflict and post-conflict settings in order to deliver essential reproductive and maternal health care services. Finally, reducing inequalities in opportunities would not only promote equity, but also drive sustainable development.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde
Serviços de Saúde Materna/organização & administração
Serviços de Saúde Reprodutiva/organização & administração
Guerra
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Colômbia
Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180129
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180129
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188654


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[PMID]:28452162
[Au] Autor:Hollis S
[Ad] Endereço:Assistant Professor, Centre for Crisis Management Research and Training (CRISMART), Department of Security, Strategy and Leadership, Swedish Defence University, Sweden.
[Ti] Título:Bridging international relations and disaster studies: the case of disaster-conflict scholarship.
[So] Source:Disasters;42(1):19-40, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1467-7717
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:International relations and disaster studies have much to gain by thinking critically about their respective theoretical and epistemological assumptions. Yet, few studies to date have sought to assess the potential value of linking these two disciplines. This paper begins to address this shortfall by examining the relationship between disasters and conflict as a research sphere that intersects international relations and disaster studies. Through an analysis of whether or not disasters contribute to intra-national and international conflict, this paper not only provides a review of the state of the art, but also serves to invite scholars to reflect on related concepts from other fields to strengthen their own approaches to the study of disasters in an international setting. An evaluation of the conceptual and theoretical contributions of each subject area provides useful heuristics for the development of disaster-conflict scholarship and encourages alternative modes of knowledge production through interdisciplinarity.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Desastres
Internacionalidade
Guerra
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180126
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180126
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/disa.12231


  9 / 19095 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29281141
[Au] Autor:Luedke AE; Logan HF
[Ad] Endereço:Vanier Canadian Graduate Scholar and PhD Student in Political Science, University of British Columbia, Canada.
[Ti] Título:'That thing of human rights': discourse, emergency assistance, and sexual violence in South Sudan's current civil war.
[So] Source:Disasters;42 Suppl 1:S99-S118, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1467-7717
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:One of the most widely covered aspects of the current conflict in South Sudan has been the use sexual violence by rival factions of the Sudan People's Liberation Movement/Army (SPLM/A) and other armed groups. While this has had the positive effect of ensuring that sexual violence is an integral component of intervention strategies in the country, it has also had a number of unintended consequences. This paper demonstrates how the narrow focus on sexual violence as a 'weapon of war', and the broader emergency lens through which the plight of civilians, especially women, has been viewed, are overly simplistic, often neglecting the root causes of such violence. More specifically, it highlights how dominant discourses on sexual violence in South Sudan's conflict have disregarded the historically violent civil-military relations that have typified the SPLM/A's leadership, and the structural violence connected with the local political economy of bride wealth and the associated commodification of feminine identities and bodies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Direitos Humanos
Delitos Sexuais
Guerra
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Sudão do Sul
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180104
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180104
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/disa.12273


  10 / 19095 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29281140
[Au] Autor:Tapscott R
[Ad] Endereço:Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy, The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Switzerland.
[Ti] Título:Policing men: militarised masculinity, youth livelihoods, and security in conflict-affected northern Uganda.
[So] Source:Disasters;42 Suppl 1:S119-S139, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1467-7717
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Relations between militaries and masculinities-and hegemonic masculinity and the state-are well-established in the literature on gender and development. However, there is less research on how militarised masculinities relate to state governance strategies. This paper, based on qualitative research conducted in northern Uganda between 2014 and 2017, offers a gender analysis of youths participating in informal security arrangements. Civilian male youths accept poorly paid or unpaid work in the informal security sector in the hope of gaining access to livelihoods that will enable them to fulfil masculine ideal-types. However, this arrangement denies them the resources necessary to achieve the ideal-type of civilian masculinity, as well as the state's military masculinity, which produces young men as subjects of the ruling regime. To reconfigure this relationship between civilian and militarised masculinities, one should understand informal security organisations in the context of alternative livelihood arrangements and take a long-term approach to the demilitarisation of the Ugandan state.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Masculinidade
Militares/psicologia
Guerra
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Militares/estatística & dados numéricos
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Medidas de Segurança
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Uganda
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180104
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180104
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171228
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/disa.12274



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