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[PMID]:29253376
[Au] Autor:Venkataramani AS; Brigell R; O'Brien R; Chatterjee P; Kawachi I; Tsai AC
[Ad] Endereço:Division of General Internal Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: avenkataramani@partners.org.
[Ti] Título:Economic opportunity, health behaviours, and health outcomes in the USA: a population-based cross-sectional study.
[So] Source:Lancet Public Health;1(1):e18-e25, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:2468-2667
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Inequality of opportunity, defined as differences in the prospects for upward social mobility, might have important consequences for health. Diminished opportunity can lower the motivation to invest in future health by reducing economic returns to health investments and undermining hope. We estimated the association between county-level economic opportunity and individual-level health in young adults in the general US population. METHODS: In this population-based cross-sectional study, we used individual-level data from the 2009-12 United States Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Surveys. Our primary outcomes were current self-reported overall health and the number of days of poor physical and mental health in the last month. Economic opportunity was measured by the county-averaged national income rank attained by individuals born to families in the lowest income quartile. We restricted our sample to adults aged 25-35 years old to match the data used to assign exposure. Multivariable ordinary least squares and probit models were used to estimate the association between the outcomes and economic opportunity. We adjusted for a range of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, including age, sex, race, education, income, access to health care, area income inequality, segregation, and social capital. FINDINGS: We assessed nearly 147 000 individuals between the ages of 25 years and 35 years surveyed from 2009 to 2012. In models adjusting for individual-level demographics and county-level socioeconomic characteristics, increases in county-level economic opportunity were associated with greater self-reported overall health. An interdecile increase in economic opportunity was associated with 0·76 fewer days of poor mental health (95% CI -1·26 to -0·25) and 0·53 fewer days of poor physical health (-0·96 to -0·09) in the last month. The results were robust to sensitivity analyses. INTERPRETATION: Economic opportunity is independently associated with self-reported health and health behaviours. Policies seeking to expand economic opportunities might have important spillover effects on health. FUNDING: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholars Program.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde
Nível de Saúde
Mobilidade Social/economia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Sistema de Vigilância de Fator de Risco Comportamental
Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Renda/estatística & dados numéricos
Masculino
Mobilidade Social/estatística & dados numéricos
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180201
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180201
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28367734
[Au] Autor:Heshmati A; Chaparro MP; Goodman A; Koupil I
[Ad] Endereço:1 Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Stockholm University/Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
[Ti] Título:Early life characteristics, social mobility during childhood and risk of stroke in later life: findings from a Swedish cohort.
[So] Source:Scand J Public Health;45(4):419-427, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1651-1905
[Cp] País de publicação:Sweden
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:AIMS: To investigate if early life characteristics and social mobility during childhood are associated with incident thrombotic stroke (TS), haemorrhagic stroke (HS) and other stroke (OS). METHODS: Our study population consists of all live births at Uppsala University Hospital in 1915-1929 (Uppsala Birth Cohort; n = 14,192), of whom 5532 males and 5061 females were singleton births and lived in Sweden in 1964. We followed them from 1 January 1964 until first diagnosis of stroke (in the National Patient Register or Causes of Death Register), emigration, death, or until 31 December 2008. Data were analysed using Cox regression, stratifying by gender. RESULTS: Gestational age was negatively associated with TS and OS in women only. Women had increased risk of TS if they were born early preterm (<35 weeks) (HR 1.54 (95% CI 1.02-2.31)) or preterm (35-36 weeks) (HR 1.37 (95% CI 1.03-1.83)) compared to women born at term. By contrast, only women who were early preterm (HR 1.98 (95% CI 1.27-3.10) had an increased risk of OS. Men who were born post-term (⩾42 weeks) had increased risk of HS (HR 1.45 (95% CI 1.04-2.01)) compared with men born at term, with no association for women. TS was associated with social mobility during childhood in women: women whose families were upwardly or downwardly mobile had increased risk of TS compared to women who were always advantaged during childhood. CONCLUSIONS: Gestational age and social mobility during childhood were associated with increased risk of stroke later in life, particularly among women, but there was some heterogeneity between stroke subtypes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Idade Gestacional
Mobilidade Social/estatística & dados numéricos
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Estudos de Coortes
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Fatores de Risco
Distribuição por Sexo
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/classificação
Suécia/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170615
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170615
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170404
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/1403494817696600


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[PMID]:28350927
[Au] Autor:Reuben A; Caspi A; Belsky DW; Broadbent J; Harrington H; Sugden K; Houts RM; Ramrakha S; Poulton R; Moffitt TE
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
[Ti] Título:Association of Childhood Blood Lead Levels With Cognitive Function and Socioeconomic Status at Age 38 Years and With IQ Change and Socioeconomic Mobility Between Childhood and Adulthood.
[So] Source:JAMA;317(12):1244-1251, 2017 03 28.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Importance: Many children in the United States and around the world are exposed to lead, a developmental neurotoxin. The long-term cognitive and socioeconomic consequences of lead exposure are uncertain. Objective: To test the hypothesis that childhood lead exposure is associated with cognitive function and socioeconomic status in adulthood and with changes in IQ and socioeconomic mobility between childhood and midlife. Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective cohort study based on a population-representative 1972-1973 birth cohort from New Zealand; the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study observed participants to age 38 years (until December 2012). Exposures: Childhood lead exposure ascertained as blood lead levels measured at age 11 years. High blood lead levels were observed among children from all socioeconomic status levels in this cohort. Main Outcomes and Measures: The IQ (primary outcome) and indexes of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Working Memory, and Processing Speed (secondary outcomes) were assessed at age 38 years using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV (WAIS-IV; IQ range, 40-160). Socioeconomic status (primary outcome) was assessed at age 38 years using the New Zealand Socioeconomic Index-2006 (NZSEI-06; range, 10 [lowest]-90 [highest]). Results: Of 1037 original participants, 1007 were alive at age 38 years, of whom 565 (56%) had been lead tested at age 11 years (54% male; 93% white). Mean (SD) blood lead level at age 11 years was 10.99 (4.63) µg/dL. Among blood-tested participants included at age 38 years, mean WAIS-IV score was 101.16 (14.82) and mean NZSEI-06 score was 49.75 (17.12). After adjusting for maternal IQ, childhood IQ, and childhood socioeconomic status, each 5-µg/dL higher level of blood lead in childhood was associated with a 1.61-point lower score (95% CI, -2.48 to -0.74) in adult IQ, a 2.07-point lower score (95% CI, -3.14 to -1.01) in perceptual reasoning, and a 1.26-point lower score (95% CI, -2.38 to -0.14) in working memory. Associations of childhood blood lead level with deficits in verbal comprehension and processing speed were not statistically significant. After adjusting for confounders, each 5-µg/dL higher level of blood lead in childhood was associated with a 1.79-unit lower score (95% CI, -3.17 to -0.40) in socioeconomic status. An association between greater blood lead levels and a decline in IQ and socioeconomic status from childhood to adulthood was observed with 40% of the association with downward mobility mediated by cognitive decline from childhood. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort born in New Zealand in 1972-1973, childhood lead exposure was associated with lower cognitive function and socioeconomic status at age 38 years and with declines in IQ and with downward social mobility. Childhood lead exposure may have long-term ramifications.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cognição
Inteligência
Chumbo/sangue
Mobilidade Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Fatores Etários
Criança
Transtornos Cognitivos
Compreensão
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Testes de Inteligência
Masculino
Memória de Curto Prazo
Nova Zelândia
Estudos Prospectivos
Fatores Sexuais
Classe Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
2P299V784P (Lead)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1704
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170714
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170714
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170329
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.1712


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[PMID]:28182492
[Au] Autor:Cobb CL; Meca A; Xie D; Schwartz SJ; Moise RK
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology and Counseling, University of Central Arkansas.
[Ti] Título:Perceptions of legal status: Associations with psychosocial experiences among undocumented Latino/a immigrants.
[So] Source:J Couns Psychol;64(2):167-178, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0022-0167
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In the present study we used a mixed-method design to examine perceptions of legal status and their association with psychosocial experiences among undocumented Latino/a immigrants in the United States Participants were asked to compare their perceived social experiences with those of documented Latinos/as in order to determine whether differences in such perceptions might emerge and whether such perceptions might differentially impact well-being. A community sample of 140 self-reported undocumented Latino/a immigrants completed questionnaires measuring perceptions of legal status, well-being (global and psychological), perceived context of reception, and experiences of discrimination. Results indicated that individuals who perceived their experiences as different from those of documented Latinos/as due to an unauthorized legal status reported less social equality as evidenced by lower well-being, increased experiences of discrimination, and a more adverse context of reception. Moreover, individuals who perceived their social experiences as different from those of documented Latinos/as due to their legal status reported issues centering on 2 domains: limited opportunity/restricted social mobility and discrimination/unfair treatment. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in terms of advancing theory and from a multicultural counseling perspective. (PsycINFO Database Record
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Hispano-Americanos/psicologia
Racismo/psicologia
Autoimagem
Imigrantes Indocumentados/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Arkansas
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Identificação Social
Mobilidade Social
Estigma Social
Inquéritos e Questionários
Texas
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170504
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170504
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170210
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1037/cou0000189


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[PMID]:28057005
[Au] Autor:Jonsson F; Sebastian MS; Hammarström A; Gustafsson PE
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, SE-901 85, Sweden. frida.jonsson@umu.se.
[Ti] Título:Intragenerational social mobility and functional somatic symptoms in a northern Swedish context: analyses of diagonal reference models.
[So] Source:Int J Equity Health;16(1):1, 2017 Jan 03.
[Is] ISSN:1475-9276
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Research indicate that social class mobility could be potentially important for health, but whether this is due to the movement itself or a result of people having been integrated in different class contexts is, to date, difficult to infer. In addition, although several theories suggest that transitions between classes in the social hierarchy can be stressful experiences, few studies have empirically examined whether such movements may have health effects, over and above the implications of "being" in these classes. In an attempt to investigate whether intragenerational social mobility is associated with functional somatic symptoms in mid-adulthood, the current study tests three partially contrasting theories. METHOD: The dissociative theory suggests that mobility in general and upward mobility in particular may be linked to psychological distress, while the falling from grace theory indicates that downward mobility is especially stressful. In contrast, the acculturation theory holds that the health implications of social mobility is not due to the movement itself but attributed to the class contexts in which people find themselves. Diagonal Reference Models were used on a sample of 924 individuals who in 1981 graduated from 9 grade in the municipality of Luleå, Sweden. Social mobility was operationalized as change in occupational class between age 30 and 42 (measured in 1995 and 2007). The health outcome was functional somatic symptoms at age 42, defined as a clustering self-reported physical symptoms, palpitation and sleeping difficulties during the last 12 months. RESULTS: Overall mobility was not associated with higher levels of functional somatic symptoms compared to being immobile (p = 0.653). After controlling for prior and current class, sex, parental social position, general health, civil status, education and unemployment, the association between downward mobility was borderline significant (p = 0.055) while upward mobility was associated with lower levels of functional somatic symptoms (p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: The current study did not find unanimous support for any of the theories. Nevertheless, it sheds light on the possibility that upward mobility may be beneficial to reduce stress-related health problems in mid-life over and above the exposure to prior and current class, while downward mobility can be of less importance for middle-age health complaints.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Sintomas Inexplicáveis
Ocupações
Classe Social
Mobilidade Social
Estresse Psicológico
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Aculturação
Adulto
Feminino
Nível de Saúde
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Suécia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171018
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171018
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170107
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12939-016-0499-1


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[PMID]:27994115
[Au] Autor:Pinto Pereira SM; Li L; Power C
[Ad] Endereço:Population, Policy and Practice, Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Child Maltreatment and Adult Living Standards at 50 Years.
[So] Source:Pediatrics;139(1), 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1098-4275
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Child maltreatment (abuse and neglect) has established effects on mental health. Less is known about its influence on adult economic circumstances. We aimed to establish associations of child maltreatment with such outcomes and explore potential pathways. METHODS: We used 1958 British birth cohort data (N = 8076) to examine associations of child neglect and abuse with adult (50 years) long-term sickness absence, not in employment, education or training (NEET), lacking assets, income-related support, poor qualifications, financial insecurity, manual social class, and social mobility. We assessed mediation of associations by 16-year cognition and mental health. RESULTS: Abuse prevalence varied from 1% (sexual) to 10% (psychological); 16% were neglected. A total of 21% experienced 1 maltreatment type, 10% experienced ≥2 types. Sexual and nonsexual abuse were associated with several outcomes; eg, for sexual abuse, adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of income-related support was 1.75 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-2.72). Associations were little affected by potential mediating factors. Neglect was associated with several adult outcomes (eg, aOR of NEET was 1.43 [95% CI, 1.10-1.85]) and associations were mediated by cognition and mental health (primarily by cognition): percent explained varied between 4% (NEET) to 70% (poor qualifications). In general, the risk of poor outcome increased by number of maltreatment types (eg, aOR for long-term sickness absence increased from 1.0 [reference] to 1.76 [95% CI, 1.32-2.35] to 2.69 [95% CI, 1.96-3.68], respectively, for 0, 1, and ≥2 types of maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Childhood maltreatment is associated with poor midadulthood socioeconomic outcomes, with accumulating risk for those experiencing multiple types of maltreatment. Cognitive ability and mental health are implicated in the pathway to outcome for neglect but not abuse.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Abuso Sexual na Infância/psicologia
Abuso Sexual na Infância/tendências
Maus-Tratos Infantis/psicologia
Maus-Tratos Infantis/tendências
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Absenteísmo
Adolescente
Adulto
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Estudos de Coortes
Escolaridade
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Renda/tendências
Lactente
Recém-Nascido
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Classe Social
Mobilidade Social
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Estatística como Assunto
Desemprego/tendências
Reino Unido
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171110
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171110
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161221
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:27428856
[Au] Autor:Elbejjani M; Fuhrer R; Abrahamowicz M; Mazoyer B; Crivello F; Tzourio C; Dufouil C
[Ad] Endereço:From the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health (Elbejjani, Fuhrer, Abrahamowicz), McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; CNRS (Mazoyer, Crivello), GIN UMR5296, Bordeaux, France; CEA (Mazoyer, Crivello), GIN UMR5296, Bordeaux, France; University of Bordeaux (Mazoyer, Crivello, Tzourio, Dufouil), Bordeaux, France; and INSERM U897 and CIC-1401 (Tzourio, Dufouil), Bordeaux School of Public Health, Bordeaux, France.
[Ti] Título:Life-Course Socioeconomic Position and Hippocampal Atrophy in a Prospective Cohort of Older Adults.
[So] Source:Psychosom Med;79(1):14-23, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1534-7796
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: Low socioeconomic position (SEP) has been linked to an increased risk of dementia and cognitive decline. However, little is known about the association between SEP and morphologic brain changes in older age. This study examines the relationships between indicators of life-course SEP with both hippocampal volume (HcV) and HcV loss in a population-based cohort of 1328 older adults aged 65 to 80 years. METHODS: Multivariable linear regression models were used to estimate the associations of SEP with baseline HcV and the annual rate of HcV atrophy according to three life-course conceptual models: the sensitive/critical periods model (which explored SEP in specific periods: in childhood [using parental education], early adulthood [based on participants' education], and midlife [based on participants' socioprofessional group]); the accumulation-of-risk model (life-course cumulative SEP), and the social mobility model (life-course SEP trajectories). RESULTS: Participants with lower midlife SEP had smaller HcV (-0.08 cm; 95% confidence interval, -0.15 to -0.01) and 0.17% (95% confidence interval, 0.04%-0.30%) faster hippocampal atrophy than participants with higher midlife SEP. Childhood and early adulthood SEPs were not related to hippocampal measures. The accumulation-of-risk and the social mobility models revealed that the accumulation of socioeconomic disadvantage and declining socioeconomic trajectories were related to faster hippocampal atrophy. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of older adults, lower socioprofessional attainment in midlife and disadvantageous life-course socioeconomic position were associated with faster hippocampal atrophy, a cerebral change linked to cognitive disorders. Results support the hypothesized links between socioenvironmental exposures related to stress and/or cognitive enrichment and brain/cognitive reserve capacities.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Escolaridade
Hipocampo/diagnóstico por imagem
Desenvolvimento Humano
Classe Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Fatores Etários
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Atrofia/patologia
Feminino
Seguimentos
Seres Humanos
Imagem por Ressonância Magnética
Masculino
Mobilidade Social
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170731
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170731
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160719
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/PSY.0000000000000365


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[PMID]:27601413
[Au] Autor:Willson AE; Shuey KM
[Ad] Endereço:University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada willson@uwo.ca.
[Ti] Título:Life Course Pathways of Economic Hardship and Mobility and Midlife Trajectories of Health.
[So] Source:J Health Soc Behav;57(3):407-22, 2016 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2150-6000
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We utilize over 40 years of prospective data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (N = 1,229) and repeated-measures latent class analysis to examine how long-term patterns of stability and change in economic hardship from childhood to adulthood are related to subsequent trajectories of midlife health. We review conceptual and methodological approaches to examining health inequality across the life course and highlight the contribution of a person-centered, disaggregated approach to modeling health and its association with long-term pathways of economic resources, including changing resources associated with mobility. Findings suggest those who experienced early mobility out of economic hardship were less likely than those in persistent economic hardship to experience a high-risk health trajectory, while experiencing later mobility did not lessen this risk. We conclude with a call for further investigation into the role of social mobility and the timing, degree, and direction of change in investigations of health inequality.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde
Pobreza
Mobilidade Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Criança
Feminino
Nível de Saúde
Seres Humanos
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Modelos Teóricos
Estudos Prospectivos
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171019
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171019
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160908
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0022146516660345


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[PMID]:27388894
[Au] Autor:Behrens T; Groß I; Siemiatycki J; Conway DI; Olsson A; Stücker I; Guida F; Jöckel KH; Pohlabeln H; Ahrens W; Brüske I; Wichmann HE; Gustavsson P; Consonni D; Merletti F; Richiardi L; Simonato L; Fortes C; Parent ME; McLaughlin J; Demers P; Landi MT; Caporaso N; Zaridze D; Szeszenia-Dabrowska N; Rudnai P; Lissowska J; Fabianova E; Tardón A; Field JK; Dumitru RS; Bencko V; Foretova L; Janout V; Kromhout H; Vermeulen R; Boffetta P; Straif K; Schüz J; Hovanec J; Kendzia B; Pesch B; Brüning T
[Ad] Endereço:Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance (IPA), Institute of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789, Bochum, Germany. behrens@ipa-dguv.de.
[Ti] Título:Occupational prestige, social mobility and the association with lung cancer in men.
[So] Source:BMC Cancer;16:395, 2016 07 07.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2407
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The nature of the association between occupational social prestige, social mobility, and risk of lung cancer remains uncertain. Using data from the international pooled SYNERGY case-control study, we studied the association between lung cancer and the level of time-weighted average occupational social prestige as well as its lifetime trajectory. METHODS: We included 11,433 male cases and 14,147 male control subjects. Each job was translated into an occupational social prestige score by applying Treiman's Standard International Occupational Prestige Scale (SIOPS). SIOPS scores were categorized as low, medium, and high prestige (reference). We calculated odds ratios (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for study center, age, smoking, ever employment in a job with known lung carcinogen exposure, and education. Trajectories in SIOPS categories from first to last and first to longest job were defined as consistent, downward, or upward. We conducted several subgroup and sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of our results. RESULTS: We observed increased lung cancer risk estimates for men with medium (OR = 1.23; 95 % CI 1.13-1.33) and low occupational prestige (OR = 1.44; 95 % CI 1.32-1.57). Although adjustment for smoking and education reduced the associations between occupational prestige and lung cancer, they did not explain the association entirely. Traditional occupational exposures reduced the associations only slightly. We observed small associations with downward prestige trajectories, with ORs of 1.13, 95 % CI 0.88-1.46 for high to low, and 1.24; 95 % CI 1.08-1.41 for medium to low trajectories. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that occupational prestige is independently associated with lung cancer among men.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Neoplasias Pulmonares/epidemiologia
Exposição Ocupacional/efeitos adversos
Fumar/efeitos adversos
Mobilidade Social/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Estudos de Casos e Controles
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Razão de Chances
Fatores de Risco
Fumar/epidemiologia
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171120
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171120
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160709
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12885-016-2432-9


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[PMID]:27379412
[Au] Autor:Knigge A
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Sociology/ICS, Utrecht University, Padualaan 14, 3584 CH, Utrecht, The Netherlands. a.knigge@uu.nl.
[Ti] Título:Beyond the Parental Generation: The Influence of Grandfathers and Great-grandfathers on Status Attainment.
[So] Source:Demography;53(4):1219-44, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1533-7790
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Studies on intergenerational social mobility usually examine the extent to which social positions of one generation determine the social positions of the next. This study investigates whether the persistence of inequality can be expected to stretch over more than two generations. Using a multigenerational version of GENLIAS, a large-scale database containing information from digitized Dutch marriage certificates during 1812-1922, this study describes and explains the influence of grandfathers and great-grandfathers on the occupational status attainment of 119,662 men in the Netherlands during industrialization. Multilevel regression models show that both grandfather's and great-grandfather's status influence the status attainment of men, after fathers and uncles are taken into account. Whereas the influence of the father and uncles decreases over time, that of the grandfather and great-grandfather remains stable. The results further suggest that grandfathers influence their grandsons through contact but also without being in contact with them. Although the gain in terms of explained variance from using a multigenerational model is moderate, leaving out the influence of the extended family considerably misrepresents the influence of the family on status attainment.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Avós
Pais
Mobilidade Social/tendências
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Emprego/tendências
Seres Humanos
Relação entre Gerações
Masculino
Países Baixos
Distribuição Espacial da População
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171025
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171025
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:160706
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13524-016-0486-6



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