Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : I02.358.984 [Categoria DeCS]
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[PMID]:29447172
[Au] Autor:Alemayehu AM; Belete GT; Adimassu NF
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Optometry, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Título:Knowledge, attitude and associated factors among primary school teachers regarding refractive error in school children in Gondar city, Northwest Ethiopia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191199, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:INTRODUCTION: Refractive error is an important cause of correctable visual impairment in the worldwide with a global distribution of 1.75% to 20.7% among schoolchildren. Teacher's knowledge about refractive error play an important role in encouraging students to seek treatment that helps in reducing the burden of visual impairment. OBJECTIVE: To determine knowledge, attitude and associated factors among primary school teachers regarding refractive error in school children in Gondar city. METHODS: Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted on 565 primary school teachers in Gondar city using pretested and structured self-administered questionnaire. For processing and analysis, SPSS version 20 was used and variables which had a P value of <0.05 in the multivariable analysis were considered as statistically significant. RESULT: A total of 565 study subjects were participated in this study with a mean age of 42.05 ± 12.01 years. Of these study participants 55.9% (95% CI: 51.9, 59.8) had good knowledge and 57.2% (95% CI: 52.9, 61.4) had favorable attitude towards refractive error. History of spectacle use [AOR = 2.13 (95% CI: 1.32, 3.43)], history of eye examination [AOR = 1.67 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.34)], training on eye health [AOR = 1.94 (95% CI; 1.09, 3.43)] and 11-20 years of experience [AOR = 2.53 (95% CI: 1.18, 5.43)] were positively associated with knowledge. Whereas being male [AOR = 2.03 (95% CI: 1.37, 3.01)], older age [AOR = 3.05 (95% CI: 1.07, 8.72)], 31-40 years of experience [AOR = 0.23 (95% CI: 0.07, 0.72)], private school type [AOR = 1.76 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.93)] and 5th -8th teaching category [AOR = 1.54 (95% CI: 1.05, 2.24)] were associated with attitude. CONCLUSION: Knowledge and attitude of study subjects were low which needs training of teachers about the refractive error.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Capacitação de Professores/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Estudos Transversais
Etiópia
Óculos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Conhecimento
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Erros de Refração/diagnóstico
Erros de Refração/etiologia
Erros de Refração/prevenção & controle
Fatores de Risco
Professores Escolares
Instituições Acadêmicas
Estudantes
Inquéritos e Questionários
Capacitação de Professores/classificação
Baixa Visão
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191199


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[PMID]:27776421
[Au] Autor:Schäfer MC; Sutherland D; McLay L; Achmadi D; van der Meer L; Sigafoos J; Lancioni GE; O'Reilly MF; Schlosser RW; Marschik PB
[Ad] Endereço:a New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain and Behaviour and School of Health Sciences, University of Canterbury , Christchurch , New Zealand.
[Ti] Título:Research note: attitudes of teachers and undergraduate students regarding three augmentative and alternative communication modalities.
[So] Source:Augment Altern Commun;32(4):312-319, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1477-3848
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The social validity of different communication modalities is a potentially important variable to consider when designing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) interventions. To assess the social validity of three AAC modes (i.e., manual signing, picture exchange, and an iPad -based speech-generating device), we asked 59 undergraduate students (pre-service teachers) and 43 teachers to watch a video explaining each mode. They were then asked to nominate the mode they perceived to be easiest to learn as well as the most intelligible, effective, and preferred. Participants were also asked to list the main reasons for their nominations and report on their experience with each modality. Most participants (68-86%) nominated the iPad-based speech-generating device (SGD) as easiest to learn, as well as the most intelligible, effective, and preferred. This device was perceived to be easy to understand and use and to have familiar and socially acceptable technology. Results suggest that iPad-based SGDs were perceived as more socially valid among this sample of teachers and undergraduate students. Information of this type may have some relevance to designing AAC supports for people who use AAC and their current and future potential communication partners.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Atitude Frente à Saúde
Auxiliares de Comunicação para Pessoas com Deficiência
Transtornos da Comunicação/reabilitação
Professores Escolares
Estudantes
Capacitação de Professores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Computadores de Mão
Gestos
Seres Humanos
Relações Interpessoais
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Inquéritos e Questionários
Universidades
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180117
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180117
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28477581
[Au] Autor:McEvedy S; Maguire T; Furness T; McKenna B
[Ad] Endereço:School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; La Trobe Business School, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia. Electronic address: s.mcevedy@latrobe.edu.au.
[Ti] Título:Sensory modulation and trauma-informed-care knowledge transfer and translation in mental health services in Victoria: Evaluation of a statewide train-the-trainer intervention.
[So] Source:Nurse Educ Pract;25:36-42, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5223
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Sensory modulation (SM) and trauma-informed-care (TIC) are therapeutic strategies which can help avoid incidents of aggression and thus reduce the use of restrictive interventions in mental health settings. In order to educate mental health nurses and allied health professionals in these strategies, a train-the-trainer intervention was developed and delivered to 19 area mental health services as a statewide, government funded program. This descriptive qualitative study evaluated the effectiveness of the intervention to: a) transfer knowledge; and, b) translate knowledge into practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with senior staff (n = 21); focus group discussions with trainees (n = 10); and, a paired in-depth interview with master trainers (n = 2). In total, 170 trainees attended two day train-the-trainer sessions. Many trainees were not in education roles. Most services facilitated further knowledge transfer to end-user clinicians, though training materials were often adapted. End-users' responses to SM/TIC training were generally positive to the training, but some were resistant to the change in practice. Limited anecdotal evidence of translation of SM/TIC into practice was provided. Ongoing support is required to maintain a focus on SM and TIC, sustain and encourage further knowledge transfer and translation, and assess the impact on consumer and staff health outcomes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Serviços de Saúde Mental
Enfermagem Psiquiátrica/educação
Capacitação de Professores/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Agressão/psicologia
Enfermagem Baseada em Evidências
Grupos Focais
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Seres Humanos
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Inquéritos e Questionários
Capacitação de Professores/normas
Vitória
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170808
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170808
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170507
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28422814
[Au] Autor:Tchekmedyian V; Shields HM; Pelletier SR; Pazo VC
[Ad] Endereço:V. Tchekmedyian is former Nancy and Elliot Comenitz Medical Education Fellow, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, and is now hematology-oncology fellow, Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. H.M. Shields is professor of medicine and associate chief, Division of Medical Communications, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. S.R. Pelletier is senior project manager, Center for Evaluation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. V.C. Pazo is hospitalist, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and instructor in medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
[Ti] Título:The Effect of Rubric-Guided, Focused, Personalized Coaching Sessions and Video-Recorded Presentations on Teaching Skills Among Fourth-Year Medical Students: A Pilot Study.
[So] Source:Acad Med;92(11):1583-1589, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1938-808X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PROBLEM: As medical students become residents, teaching becomes an expected and integral responsibility. Yet, training-for-teaching opportunities are lacking. In 2014, the authors designed a pilot study using rubric-guided, focused, personalized coaching sessions and video-recorded presentations to improve student teaching skills among fourth-year students at Harvard Medical School. APPROACH: In 2014-2015, the authors recruited students from an elective on how to tutor preclinical students for the pilot, which consisted of four phases: a precoaching teaching presentation, a 30- to 45-minute coaching session, a postcoaching teaching presentation, and blinded reviewer ratings. Students' pre- and postcoaching presentations were video recorded. Using a scoring rubric for 15 teaching skills, students rated their pre- and postcoaching videos. Blinded reviewers also rated the pre- and postcoaching presentations using the same rubric with an additional category to gauge their overall impression. OUTCOMES: Fourteen students completed all four phases of the pilot. Students' ratings demonstrated statistically significant improvement in several teaching skills, including presentation content (P < .001), rate of speech (P = .001), and opening statement and learning objectives (P = .004). Blinded reviewers' ratings demonstrated statistically significant improvements in several teaching skills, including opening statement and learning objectives (P < .001), overall impression (P = .001), and conclusion and summary of learning objectives (P = .004). Students provided largely positive comments on the interventions. NEXT STEPS: The authors will work toward addressing limitations in the rubric, using coaching in different teaching settings, addressing the interventions' generalizability, training coaches, and performing additional evaluations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos
Competência Profissional
Estudantes de Medicina
Capacitação de Professores/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Projetos Piloto
Ensino
Gravação em Vídeo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170420
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/ACM.0000000000001686


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[PMID]:28402017
[Au] Autor:Kew KM; Carr R; Donovan T; Gordon M
[Ad] Endereço:British Medical Journal Technology Assessment Group (BMJ-TAG), BMJ Knowledge Centre, BMA House, Tavistock Square, London, UK, WC1H 9JR.
[Ti] Título:Asthma education for school staff.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;4:CD012255, 2017 Apr 12.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Teachers and school staff should be competent in managing asthma in schools. Demonstrated low levels of asthma knowledge mean that staff may not know how best to protect a child with asthma in their care, or may fail to take appropriate action in the event of a serious attack. Education about asthma could help to improve this knowledge and lead to better asthma outcomes for children. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of asthma education programmes for school staff, and to identify content and attributes underpinning them. SEARCH METHODS: We conducted the most recent searches on 29 November 2016. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials comparing an intervention to educate school staff about asthma versus a control group. We included studies reported as full text, those published as abstract only and unpublished data. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors screened the searches, extracted outcome data and intervention characteristics from included studies and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes for the quantitative synthesis were emergency department (ED) or hospital visits, mortality and asthma control; we graded the main results and presented evidence in a 'Summary of findings' table. We planned a qualitative synthesis of intervention characteristics, but study authors were unable to provide the necessary information.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios, and continuous data as mean differences or standardised mean differences, all with a random-effects model. We assessed clinical, methodological and statistical heterogeneity when performing meta-analyses, and we narratively described skewed data. MAIN RESULTS: Five cluster-RCTs of 111 schools met the review eligibility criteria. Investigators measured outcomes in participating staff and often in children or parents, most often at between 1 and 12 months.All interventions were educational programmes but duration, content and delivery varied; some involved elements of training for pupils or primary care providers. We noted risk of selection, performance, detection and attrition biases, although to a differing extent across studies and outcomes.Quanitative and qualitative analyses were limited. Only one study reported visits to the ED or hospital and provided data that were too skewed for analysis. No studies reported any deaths or adverse events. Studies did not report asthma control consistently, but results showed no difference between groups on the paediatric asthma quality of life questionnaire (mean difference (MD) 0.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.03 to 0.31; 1005 participants; we downgraded the quality of evidence to low for risk of bias and indirectness). Data for symptom days, night-time awakenings, restricted activities of daily living and school absences were skewed or could not be analysed; some mean scores were better in the trained group, but most differences between groups were small and did not persist to 24 months.Schools that received asthma education were more adherent to asthma policies, and staff were better prepared; more schools that had received staff asthma training had written asthma policies compared with control schools, more intervention schools showed improvement in measures taken to prevent or manage exercise-induced asthma attacks and more staff at intervention schools reported that they felt able to administer salbutamol via a spacer. However, the quality of the evidence was low; results show imbalances at baseline, and confidence in the evidence was limited by risk of bias and imprecision. Staff knowledge was higher in groups that had received asthma education, although results were inconsistent and difficult to interpret owing to differences between scales (low quality).Available information about the interventions was insufficient for review authors to conduct a meaningful qualitative synthesis of the content that led to a successful intervention, or of the resources required to replicate results accurately. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Asthma education for school staff increases asthma knowledge and preparedness, but studies vary and all available evidence is of low quality. Studies have not yet captured whether this improvement in knowledge has led to appreciable benefits over the short term or the longer term for the safety and health of children with asthma in school. Randomised evidence does not contribute to our knowledge of content or attributes of interventions that lead to the best outcomes, or of resources required for successful implementation.Complete reporting of the content and resources of educational interventions is essential for assessment of their effectiveness and feasibility for implementation. This applies to both randomised and non-randomised studies, although the latter may be better placed to observe important clinical outcomes such as exacerbations and mortality in the longer term.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Asma/terapia
Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde
Professores Escolares
Instituições Acadêmicas
Capacitação de Professores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Absenteísmo
Criança
Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/utilização
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde
Seres Humanos
Qualidade de Vida
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170801
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170801
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170413
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD012255.pub2


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[PMID]:28328309
[Au] Autor:Joiner MC; Tracey MW; Kacin SE; Burmeister JW
[Ad] Endereço:a School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201.
[Ti] Título:IBPRO - A Novel Short-Duration Teaching Course in Advanced Physics and Biology Underlying Cancer Radiotherapy.
[So] Source:Radiat Res;187(6):637-640, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1938-5404
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This article provides a summary and status report of the ongoing advanced education program IBPRO - Integrated course in Biology and Physics of Radiation Oncology. IBPRO is a five-year program funded by NCI. It addresses the recognized deficiency in the number of mentors available who have the required knowledge and skill to provide the teaching and training that is required for future radiation oncologists and researchers in radiation sciences. Each year, IBPRO brings together 50 attendees typically at assistant professor level and upwards, who are already qualified/certified radiation oncologists, medical physicists or biologists. These attendees receive keynote lectures and activities based on active learning strategies, merging together the clinical, biological and physics underpinnings of radiation oncology, at the forefront of the field. This experience is aimed at increasing collaborations, raising the level and amount of basic and applied research undertaken in radiation oncology, and enabling attendees to confidently become involved in the future teaching and training of researchers and radiation oncologists.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Currículo
Docentes/educação
Física Sanitária/educação
Radioterapia (Especialidade)/educação
Radioterapia
Capacitação de Professores/organização & administração
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Michigan
Proteção Radiológica
Gestão da Segurança
Ensino/organização & administração
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170827
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170827
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; S
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170323
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1667/RR14723.1


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[PMID]:28255600
[Au] Autor:George CL; Wood-Kanupka J; Oriel KN
[Ad] Endereço:Dep. of Special Education, Saint Joseph's University, 5600 City Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19131, USA. Tel 610-660-3167. cgeorge@sju.edu.
[Ti] Título:Impact of Participation in Community-Based Research Among Undergraduate and Graduate Students.
[So] Source:J Allied Health;46(1):e15-e24, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1945-404X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Participation in community-based research provides college students with a high-impact experience involving both research and service learning. Presently, the impact of participation in community-based research projects has been measured most often through the use of post-learning course evaluations and case studies. The authors describe the impact of participation in community-based research, at a small liberal arts college, on undergraduate education students and graduate physical therapy students using the Community-Based Research Student Learning Outcomes Survey. Results from 2 years of survey responses and open-ended responses suggest that participation in such an experience may impact professional and personal growth, educational experiences, and civic engagement. This study provides support for universities and colleges to continue offering high-impact learning experiences for students by utilizing community-based research experiences while collaborating between academic departments.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade/métodos
Crianças com Deficiência/reabilitação
Estudos Interdisciplinares
Fisioterapia/educação
Seguridade Social
Estudantes/psicologia
Capacitação de Professores/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade/organização & administração
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade/normas
Crianças com Deficiência/educação
Educação Especial/métodos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Educação Física e Treinamento/métodos
Fisioterapia/métodos
Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos
Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde
Projetos de Pesquisa
Universidades
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1703
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170331
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170331
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170304
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28222101
[Au] Autor:Kesztyüs D; Lauer R; Kesztyüs T; Kilian R; Steinacker JM; "Join the Healthy Boat" Study Group
[Ad] Endereço:Section Sports and Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany.
[Ti] Título:Costs and effects of a state-wide health promotion program in primary schools in Germany - the Baden-Württemberg Study: A cluster-randomized, controlled trial.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(2):e0172332, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:AIM: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the state-wide implementation of the health promotion program "Join the Healthy Boat" in primary schools in Germany. METHODS: Cluster-randomized intervention trial with wait-list control group. Anthropometric data of 1733 participating children (7.1 ± 0.6 years) were taken by trained staff before and after a one year intervention period in the academic year 2010/11. Parents provided information about the health status, and the health behaviour of their children and themselves, parental anthropometrics, and socio-economic background variables. Incidence of abdominal obesity, defined as waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) ≥ 0.5, was determined. Generalized linear models were applied to account for the clustering of data within schools, and to adjust for baseline-values. Losses to follow-up and missing data were analysed. From a societal perspective, the overall costs, costs per pupil, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) to identify the costs per case of averted abdominal obesity were calculated. RESULTS: The final regression model for the incidence of abdominal obesity shows lower odds for the intervention group after an adjustment for grade, gender, baseline WHtR, and breakfast habits (odds ratio = 0.48, 95% CI [0.25; 0.94]). The intervention costs per child/year were €25.04. The costs per incidental case of averted abdominal obesity varied between €1515 and €1993, depending on the different dimensions of the target group. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the positive effects of state-wide, school-based health promotion on incidental abdominal obesity, at affordable costs and with proven cost-effectiveness. These results should support allocative decisions of policymakers. An early start to the prevention of abdominal obesity is of particular importance because of its close relationship to non-communicable diseases. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS), Freiburg University, Germany, DRKS-ID: DRKS00000494.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Custos e Análise de Custo/estatística & dados numéricos
Promoção da Saúde
Obesidade Abdominal/prevenção & controle
Serviços de Saúde Escolar
Instituições Acadêmicas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Criança
Comportamento Infantil
Análise Custo-Benefício
Dieta
Alemanha
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde
Promoção da Saúde/economia
Promoção da Saúde/organização & administração
Seres Humanos
Incidência
Estilo de Vida
Obesidade Abdominal/epidemiologia
Pais
Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde
Serviços de Saúde Escolar/economia
Serviços de Saúde Escolar/organização & administração
Professores Escolares
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Inquéritos e Questionários
Capacitação de Professores/economia
Capacitação de Professores/organização & administração
Razão Cintura-Estatura
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170817
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170817
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170222
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0172332


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[PMID]:28181884
[Au] Autor:Scott LA; Thoma CA; Puglia L; Temple P; D'Aguilar A
[Ad] Endereço:LaRon A. Scott, Colleen A. Thoma, Lauren Puglia, Peter Temple, and Allison D'Aguilar, Virginia Commonwealth University.
[Ti] Título:Implementing a UDL Framework: A Study of Current Personnel Preparation Practices.
[So] Source:Intellect Dev Disabil;55(1):25-36, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1934-9556
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Young adults with intellectual disability (ID) continue to experience the least successful postschool outcomes among transition-aged youth ( Sanford et al., 2011 ). Experts disagree on the most effective approach to improve outcomes such as employment, postsecondary education, and community living. In 2015, the National Goals Conference brought together educational researchers to set an agenda to guide the field in terms of research, practice, and policy ( Thoma, Cain, & Walther-Thomas, 2015 ). One of their recommendations, based on promising research and practices, urged the field to identify effective personnel preparation and professional development practices that ensure general and special educators can implement a UDL framework ( Thoma, Cain, et al., 2015 ). This study surveyed program coordinators at accredited universities to determine what is currently being done to prepare educators to implement a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework, the extent to which a UDL framework is being incorporated into preservice courses in higher education, and how a UDL framework is being used to improve postschool outcomes for youth with ID.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação de Pessoa com Deficiência Intelectual
Modelos Educacionais
Capacitação de Professores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Competência Profissional
Universidades
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170515
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170515
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170210
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1352/1934-9556-55.1.25


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[PMID]:28181886
[Au] Autor:Rao K; Smith SJ; Lowrey KA
[Ad] Endereço:Kavita Rao, University of Hawai'i at Manoa; Sean J. Smith, University of Kansas; and K. Alisa Lowrey, University of Southern Mississippi.
[Ti] Título:UDL and Intellectual Disability: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go?
[So] Source:Intellect Dev Disabil;55(1):37-47, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1934-9556
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:As an instructional design framework that can be used to design curriculum for students with and without disabilities, Universal Design for Learning (UDL) has the potential to support meaningful inclusion of students with intellectual disability (ID) in general educational settings. This article presents an overview of the existing set of research studies on UDL application for students with ID in PreK-12 settings. The current body of research illustrates that UDL is being applied to instructional activities for students with ID to examine a variety of interventions (e.g., adapted stories for individual students, inclusive general education curriculum) and outcomes (e.g., interaction, perceptions, knowledge gains) in self-contained and general educational settings. It also identifies important questions for consideration in future research as the field seeks to determine how UDL guidelines can be applied to curriculum, used with evidence-based and effective practices, and used to support schoolwide initiatives inclusive of students with ID.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação de Pessoa com Deficiência Intelectual
Inclusão Educacional
Modelos Educacionais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Educação de Pessoa com Deficiência Intelectual/tendências
Seres Humanos
Inclusão Educacional/tendências
Instituições Acadêmicas
Capacitação de Professores
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1705
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170515
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170515
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170210
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1352/1934-9556-55.1.37



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