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[PMID]:29440600
[Ti] Título:Protecting equine vets from work injuries.
[So] Source:Vet Rec;182(6):156, 2018 02 10.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Promoção da Saúde/métodos
Cavalos
Traumatismos Ocupacionais/prevenção & controle
Médicos Veterinários
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Comportamento Animal
Cavalos/psicologia
Seres Humanos
Propriedade
Reino Unido
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:NEWS
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180307
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180307
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29194298
[Au] Autor:Kardong-Edgren S; Oermann MH; Rizzolo MA; Odom-Maryon T
[Ad] Endereço:About the Authors Suzan Kardong-Edgren, PhD, RN, CHSE, FAAN, ANEF, is a professor and director of the RISE Center, School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pennsylvania. Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, is Thelma M. Ingles Professor of Nursing and director of evaluation and educational research, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina. Mary Anne Rizzolo, EdD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, is a consultant for the National League for Nursing. Tamara Odom-Maryon, PhD, is a professor of research, Washington State University College of Nursing, Spokane. For more information, contact Dr. Kardong-Edgren at kardongedgren@rmu.edu.
[Ti] Título:Establishing Inter- and Intrarater Reliability for High-Stakes Testing Using Simulation.
[So] Source:Nurs Educ Perspect;38(2):63-68, 2017 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5026
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:AIM: This article reports one method to develop a standardized training method to establish the inter- and intrarater reliability of a group of raters for high-stakes testing. BACKGROUND: Simulation is used increasingly for high-stakes testing, but without research into the development of inter- and intrarater reliability for raters. METHOD: Eleven raters were trained using a standardized methodology. Raters scored 28 student videos over a six-week period. Raters then rescored all videos over a two-day period to establish both intra- and interrater reliability. RESULTS: One rater demonstrated poor intrarater reliability; a second rater failed all students. Kappa statistics improved from the moderate to substantial agreement range with the exclusion of the two outlier raters' scores. CONCLUSION: There may be faculty who, for different reasons, should not be included in high-stakes testing evaluations. All faculty are content experts, but not all are expert evaluators.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação em Enfermagem/métodos
Avaliação Educacional
Treinamento por Simulação/métodos
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Docentes de Enfermagem
Seres Humanos
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/01.NEP.0000000000000114


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[PMID]:29293674
[Au] Autor:Wingenbach TSH; Ashwin C; Brosnan M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, Somerset, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Sex differences in facial emotion recognition across varying expression intensity levels from videos.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190634, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:There has been much research on sex differences in the ability to recognise facial expressions of emotions, with results generally showing a female advantage in reading emotional expressions from the face. However, most of the research to date has used static images and/or 'extreme' examples of facial expressions. Therefore, little is known about how expression intensity and dynamic stimuli might affect the commonly reported female advantage in facial emotion recognition. The current study investigated sex differences in accuracy of response (Hu; unbiased hit rates) and response latencies for emotion recognition using short video stimuli (1sec) of 10 different facial emotion expressions (anger, disgust, fear, sadness, surprise, happiness, contempt, pride, embarrassment, neutral) across three variations in the intensity of the emotional expression (low, intermediate, high) in an adolescent and adult sample (N = 111; 51 male, 60 female) aged between 16 and 45 (M = 22.2, SD = 5.7). Overall, females showed more accurate facial emotion recognition compared to males and were faster in correctly recognising facial emotions. The female advantage in reading expressions from the faces of others was unaffected by expression intensity levels and emotion categories used in the study. The effects were specific to recognition of emotions, as males and females did not differ in the recognition of neutral faces. Together, the results showed a robust sex difference favouring females in facial emotion recognition using video stimuli of a wide range of emotions and expression intensity variations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Fatores Sexuais
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Emoções
Reconhecimento Facial
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Estimulação Luminosa
Tempo de Reação
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180221
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180221
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190634


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[PMID]:28594247
[Au] Autor:Juste-Lorente O; Maza M; Lorente AI; Lopez-Valdes FJ
[Ad] Endereço:a Impact Laboratory-Aragon Institute for Engineering Research (I3A) , University of Zaragoza , Alcañiz, Teruel , Spain.
[Ti] Título:Differences in the kinematics of booster-seated pediatric occupants using two different car seats.
[So] Source:Traffic Inj Prev;19(1):18-22, 2018 01 02.
[Is] ISSN:1538-957X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to compare the performance of forward-facing child restraint systems (CRS) mounted on 2 different seats. METHODS: Two different anthropomorphic test device (ATD) sizes (P3 and P6), using the same child restraint system (a non-ISOFIX high-back booster seat), were exposed to the ECE R44 regulatory deceleration pulse in a deceleration sled. Two different seats (seat A, seat B) were used. Three repetitions per ATD and mounting seat were done, resulting in a total of 12 sled crashes. Dummy sensors measured the head tri-axial acceleration and angular rate and the thorax tri-axial acceleration, all acquired at 10,000 Hz. A high-speed video camera recorded the impact at 1,000 frames per second. The 3D kinematics of the head and torso of the ATDs were captured using a high-speed motion capture system (1,000 Hz). A pair-matched statistical analysis compared the outcomes of the tests using the 2 different seats. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences in the kinematic response of the ATDs associated with the type of seat were observed. The maximum 3 ms peak of the resultant head acceleration was higher on seat A for the P3 dummy (54.5 ± 1.9 g vs. 44.2 ± 0.5 g; P =.012) and for the P6 dummy (56.0 ± 0.8 g vs. 51.7 ± 1.2 g; P =.015). The peak belt force was higher on seat A than on seat B for the P3 dummy (5,488.0 ± 198.0 N vs. 4,160.6 ± 63.6 N; P =.008) and for the P6 dummy (7,014.0 ± 271.0 N vs. 5,719.3 ± 37.4 N; P =.015). The trajectory of the ATD head was different between the 2 seats in the sagittal, transverse, and frontal planes. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the overall response of the booster-seated occupant exposed to the same impact conditions was different depending on the seat used regardless of the size of the ATD. The differences observed in the response of the occupants between the 2 seats can be attributed to the differences in cushion stiffness, seat pan geometry, and belt geometry. However, these results were obtained for 2 particular seat models and a specific CRS and therefore cannot be directly extrapolated to the generality of vehicle seats and CRS.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Acidentes de Trânsito/estatística & dados numéricos
Sistemas de Proteção para Crianças/estatística & dados numéricos
Cabeça/fisiologia
Tronco/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Aceleração
Fenômenos Biomecânicos
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Desaceleração
Desenho de Equipamento
Seres Humanos
Manequins
Tórax/fisiologia
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180202
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180202
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170609
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/15389588.2017.1334119


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Registro de Ensaios Clínicos
Registro de Ensaios Clínicos
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[PMID]:28449658
[Au] Autor:De Lepeleere S; De Bourdeaudhuij I; Cardon G; Verloigne M
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Movement and Sport Sciences, Ghent University, Watersportlaan 2, 9000, Ghent, Belgium. Sara.DeLepeleere@UGent.be.
[Ti] Título:The effect of an online video intervention 'Movie Models' on specific parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to children's physical activity, screen-time and healthy diet: a quasi experimental study.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;17(1):366, 2017 04 27.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: In children, being sufficiently physically active, having low levels of screen-time and having a healthy diet are largely influenced by parenting practices. Children of parents applying positive parenting practices are at lower risk for overweight and obesity. Therefore, we investigated the effect of a health promoting online video intervention for parents ('Movie Models') on children's physical activity (PA), screen-time and healthy diet, and on specific parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to these parenting practices. The online videos are delivered to parents of primary schoolchildren, and were based on real-life scenarios. METHODS: A two-armed, quasi experimental design was used. Parents of primary schoolchildren were recruited between November and December 2013 by spreading an appeal in social media, and by contacting primary schools. Participating parents were predominantly of high socio-economic status (SES) (83.1%), and only 6.8% of children were overweight/obese. Intervention group participants were invited to watch online videos for 4 weeks. Specific parenting practices, parental self-efficacy, PA, screen-time and healthy diet of the child were assessed at baseline (T0), at one (T1) and at four (T2) months post baseline. Repeated Measures (Multivariate) ANOVAs were used to examine intervention effects. The potential moderating effect of age and gender of the child and parental SES was also examined. RESULTS: Between T0 and T2, no significant intervention effects were found on children's PA, screen-time or healthy diet. Most significant intervention effects were found for more complex parenting practices (e.g., an increase in motivating the child to eat fruit). Subgroup analyses showed that the intervention had more effect on the actual parenting practices related to PA, screen-time and healthy diet in parents of older children (10-12 years old), whereas intervention effects on parental self-efficacy related to those behaviors were stronger in parents of younger children (6-9 years old). CONCLUSIONS: 'Movie Models' was effective in increasing some important parenting practices and parental self-efficacy related to PA, screen-time and healthy diet in children. Therefore, the current study is an important first step in promoting effective parenting-related factors, and possibly increasing children's healthy diet and PA, and decreasing screen-time. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02278809 in ClinicalTrials.gov on October 28, 2014 (retrospectively registered).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Exercício
Educação em Saúde/métodos
Dieta Saudável
Poder Familiar/psicologia
Estilo de Vida Sedentário
Autoeficácia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Fatores Etários
Criança
Feminino
Promoção da Saúde/métodos
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Obesidade/prevenção & controle
Sobrepeso
Fatores Sexuais
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CLINICAL STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180121
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180121
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12889-017-4264-1


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[PMID]:29195623
[Au] Autor:Byrd CT; Croft R; Gkalitsiou Z; Hampton E
[Ad] Endereço:The University of Texas, Austin, USA. Electronic address: Courtney.byrd@austin.utexas.edu.
[Ti] Título:Clinical utility of self-disclosure for adults who stutter: Apologetic versus informative statements.
[So] Source:J Fluency Disord;54:1-13, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1873-801X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study was to explore the clinical utility of self-disclosure, particularly, whether disclosing in an informative manner would result in more positive observer ratings of the speaker who stutters than either disclosing in an apologetic manner or choosing not to self-disclose at all. METHOD: Observers (N=338) were randomly assigned to view one of six possible videos (i.e., adult male informative self-disclosure, adult male apologetic self-disclosure, adult male no self-disclosure, adult female informative self-disclosure, adult female apologetic self-disclosure, adult female no self-disclosure). Observers completed a survey assessing their perceptions of the speaker they viewed immediately after watching the video. RESULTS: Results suggest that self-disclosing in an informative manner leads to significantly more positive observer ratings than choosing not to self-disclose. In contrast, use of an apologetic statement, for the most part, does not yield significantly more positive ratings than choosing not to self-disclose. CONCLUSION: Clinicians should recommend their clients self-disclose in an informative manner to facilitate more positive observer perceptions.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Autorrevelação
Gagueira/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Revelação
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Inquéritos e Questionários
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171229
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171229
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171203
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28801497
[Au] Autor:Starke SD; May SA
[Ad] Endereço:The Royal Veterinary College,Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, UK.
[Ti] Título:Veterinary student competence in equine lameness recognition and assessment: a mixed methods study.
[So] Source:Vet Rec;181(7):168, 2017 Aug 12.
[Is] ISSN:2042-7670
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The development of perceptual skills is an important aspect of veterinary education. The authors investigated veterinary student competency in lameness evaluation at two stages, before (third year) and during (fourth/fifth year) clinical rotations. Students evaluated horses in videos, where horses were presented during trot on a straight line and in circles. Eye-tracking data were recorded during assessment on the straight line to follow student gaze. On completing the task, students filled in a structured questionnaire. Results showed that the experienced students outperformed inexperienced students, although even experienced students may classify one in four horses incorrectly. Mistakes largely arose from classifying an incorrect limb as lame. The correct detection of sound horses was at chance level. While the experienced student cohort primarily looked at upper body movement (head and sacrum) during lameness assessment, the inexperienced cohort focused on limb movement. Student self-assessment of performance was realistic, and task difficulty was most commonly rated between 3 and 4 out of 5. The inexperienced students named a considerably greater number of visual lameness features than the experienced students. Future dedicated training based on the findings presented here may help students to develop more reliable lameness assessment skills.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Competência Clínica
Educação em Veterinária
Doenças dos Cavalos/diagnóstico
Coxeadura Animal/diagnóstico
Estudantes de Medicina
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Cavalos
Seres Humanos
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170815
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170815
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170813
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/vr.104245


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[PMID]:28650415
[Au] Autor:Burjek NE; Nishisaki A; Fiadjoe JE; Adams HD; Peeples KN; Raman VT; Olomu PN; Kovatsis PG; Jagannathan N; Hunyady A; Bosenberg A; Tham S; Low D; Hopkins P; Glover C; Olutoye O; Szmuk P; McCloskey J; Dalesio N; Koka R; Greenberg R; Watkins S; Patel V; Reynolds P; Matuszczak M; Jain R; Khalil S; Polaner D; Zieg J; Szolnoki J; Sathyamoorthy K; Taicher B; Riveros Perez NR; Bhattacharya S; Bhalla T; Stricker P; Lockman J; Galvez J; Rehman M; Von Ungern-Sternberg B; Sommerfield D; Soneru C; Chiao F; Richtsfeld M; Belani K; Sarmiento L; Mireles S; Bilen Rosas G; Park R; Peyton J; PeDI Collaborative Investigators
[Ad] Endereço:From the Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (N.E.B., N.J.); Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (A.N., J.E.F., K.N.P.); Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida (H.D.A.); Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (V.T.R.); Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern and Children's Health System of Texas, Dallas, Texas (P.N.O.); and Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Children's Hospital of Boston, Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (P.G.K.). Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington Department of Anesthesiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas Department of Anesthesiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas Department of Anesthesiology, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern and Children's Health System of Texas, Dallas, Texas Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland Department of Anesthesiology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee Department of Anesthesiology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology, University of Michigan Health Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas Department of Anesthesiology, Children's Hospital of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado Department of Anesthesiology, Children's Hospital of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado Department of Anesthesiology, Children's Hospital of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado Department of Anesthesiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Children's Hospital of Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia Department of Anesthesiology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York Dep.artment of Anesthesiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota Dep.artment of Anesthesiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota Department of Anesthesiology, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City, Mexico Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California Department of Anesthesiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Children's Hospital of Boston, Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Children's Hospital of Boston, Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
[Ti] Título:Videolaryngoscopy versus Fiber-optic Intubation through a Supraglottic Airway in Children with a Difficult Airway: An Analysis from the Multicenter Pediatric Difficult Intubation Registry.
[So] Source:Anesthesiology;127(3):432-440, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1528-1175
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The success rates and related complications of various techniques for intubation in children with difficult airways remain unknown. The primary aim of this study is to compare the success rates of fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway to videolaryngoscopy in children with difficult airways. Our secondary aim is to compare the complication rates of these techniques. METHODS: Observational data were collected from 14 sites after management of difficult pediatric airways. Patient age, intubation technique, success per attempt, use of continuous ventilation, and complications were recorded for each case. First-attempt success and complications were compared in subjects managed with fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway and videolaryngoscopy. RESULTS: Fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway and videolaryngoscopy had similar first-attempt success rates (67 of 114, 59% vs. 404 of 786, 51%; odds ratio 1.35; 95% CI, 0.91 to 2.00; P = 0.16). In subjects less than 1 yr old, fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway was more successful on the first attempt than videolaryngoscopy (19 of 35, 54% vs. 79 of 220, 36%; odds ratio, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.04 to 4.31; P = 0.042). Complication rates were similar in the two groups (20 vs. 13%; P = 0.096). The incidence of hypoxemia was lower when continuous ventilation through the supraglottic airway was used throughout the fiber-optic intubation attempt. CONCLUSIONS: In this nonrandomized study, first-attempt success rates were similar for fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway and videolaryngoscopy. Fiber-optic intubation via supraglottic airway is associated with higher first-attempt success than videolaryngoscopy in infants with difficult airways. Continuous ventilation through the supraglottic airway during fiber-optic intubation attempts may lower the incidence of hypoxemia.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Tecnologia de Fibra Óptica
Intubação Intratraqueal/instrumentação
Intubação Intratraqueal/métodos
Laringoscopia/instrumentação
Laringoscopia/métodos
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Criança
Pré-Escolar
Desenho de Equipamento
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Laringoscópios
Masculino
Sistema de Registros/estatística & dados numéricos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170901
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170901
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170627
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/ALN.0000000000001758


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[PMID]:28566579
[Au] Autor:Goto A; Hanya M; Yoshimi A; Uchida M; Takeuchi S; Aida N; Suematsu M; Abe K; Yasui H; Kamei H; Noda Y
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Clinical Sciences and Neuropsychopharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmacy, Meijo University.
[Ti] Título:Usefulness of Interprofessional Education (Tsurumai-Meijo IPE) in Program Collaborating with Simulated Patients.
[So] Source:Yakugaku Zasshi;137(6):733-744, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1347-5231
[Cp] País de publicação:Japan
[La] Idioma:jpn
[Ab] Resumo:Collaboration with multiple healthcare professionals is important to provide safer and higher quality care. Interprofessional education (IPE) promotes the practice of team-based care. The establishment of Tsurumai-Meijo IPE, including interprofessional education and practice (IPEP) and video-teaching materials, was conducted in collaboration with school of medicine/nursing in Nagoya University and Fujita Health University, because Meijo University does not have its own clinical settings and faculties except for pharmacy. In the established Tsurumai-Meijo IPE, pharmacy, medicine, and nursing students interviewed simulated patients (SP) together or separately and practiced team-based care through Tsurumai-Meijo IPEP. Students could learn in advance and on their own about each professional's knowledge related to patient care by using video-teaching materials from the Meijo IPE homepage. Using a questionnaire survey at the end of program, this study was examined whether Tsurumai-Meijo IPEP, and video-teaching materials were useful for understanding importance of team-based care. More than 83% of students indicated that Tsurumai-Meijo IPE is useful on future clinical practice. This suggests that the program and materials are beneficial to the medical student education. In the optional survey of some clinical pharmacists, who had participated in Tsurumai-Meijo IPE before graduation, they utilized it in their work and it facilitated their work related to team-based care. Tsurumai-Meijo IPE collaborating with SP is likely to contribute to provide high quality and safe team-based care by taking advantage of specialized professional ability of healthcare professionals.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação Médica/métodos
Educação em Enfermagem/métodos
Educação em Farmácia/métodos
Colaboração Intersetorial
Simulação de Paciente
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Competência Clínica
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente
Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
Inquéritos e Questionários
Materiais de Ensino
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171017
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171017
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170602
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1248/yakushi.16-00215


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[PMID]:28521189
[Au] Autor:Van Calster L; Van Hoecke AS; Octaef A; Boen F
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: Vancalsterlisa@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Does a video displaying a stair climbing model increase stair use in a worksite setting?
[So] Source:Public Health;149:11-20, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5616
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of improving the visibility of the stairwell and of displaying a video with a stair climbing model on climbing and descending stair use in a worksite setting. STUDY DESIGN: Intervention study. METHODS: Three consecutive one-week intervention phases were implemented: (1) the visibility of the stairs was improved by the attachment of pictograms that indicated the stairwell; (2) a video showing a stair climbing model was sent to the employees by email; and (3) the same video was displayed on a television screen at the point-of-choice (POC) between the stairs and the elevator. The interventions took place in two buildings. The implementation of the interventions varied between these buildings and the sequence was reversed. RESULTS: Improving the visibility of the stairs increased both stair climbing (+6%) and descending stair use (+7%) compared with baseline. Sending the video by email yielded no additional effect on stair use. By contrast, displaying the video at the POC increased stair climbing in both buildings by 12.5% on average. One week after the intervention, the positive effects on stair climbing remained in one of the buildings, but not in the other. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that improving the visibility of the stairwell and displaying a stair climbing model on a screen at the POC can result in a short-term increase in both climbing and descending stair use.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento de Escolha
Promoção da Saúde/métodos
Saúde do Trabalhador
Subida de Escada
Gravação de Videoteipe
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Elevadores e Escadas Rolantes/estatística & dados numéricos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Local de Trabalho
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170825
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170825
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170519
[St] Status:MEDLINE



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