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[PMID]:28452044
[Au] Autor:Luckmann R; White MJ; Costanza ME; Frisard CF; Cranos C; Sama S; Yood R
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lave Ave. N, Worcester, MA, 01655, USA. LuckmanR@ummhc.org.
[Ti] Título:Implementation and process evaluation of three interventions to promote screening mammograms delivered for 4 years in a large primary care population.
[So] Source:Transl Behav Med;7(3):547-556, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1613-9860
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The optimal form of outreach to promote repeated, on time screening mammograms in primary care has not been established. The purpose of this study is to assess the implementation process and process outcomes for three interventions for promoting biannual screening mammography in a randomized trial. In a large urban primary care practice over a 4-year period, we randomized women aged 40-85 and eligible for mammograms to three interventions: reminder letter only (LO), reminder letter + reminder call (RC), and reminder letter + counseling call (CC). We tracked information system development, staff training, patient and provider recruitment, reach, dose delivered and received, fidelity, and context measures. Ninety-three of 95 providers approved participation by 80% (23,999) of age-eligible patients, of whom only 207 (0.9%) opted not to receive any intervention. Of 9161 initial reminder letters mailed to women coming due or overdue for mammograms, 0.8% were undeliverable. Of women in the RC and CC arms unresponsive to the first reminder letter (n = 3982), 71.4% were called and reached, and of those, 49.1% scheduled a mammogram. Only 33.4% of women reached in the CC arm received full counseling, and women in the CC arm were less likely to schedule a mammogram than those in the RC arm. Implementing mail and telephone mammography reminders is feasible and acceptable in a large urban practice and reaches a majority of patients. Many schedule a mammogram when reached. A reminder letter followed by a simple reminder call if needed may be the optimal approach to promoting screening mammograms.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aconselhamento
Detecção Precoce de Câncer/métodos
Promoção da Saúde/métodos
Mamografia
Atenção Primária à Saúde
Sistemas de Alerta
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Neoplasias da Mama/diagnóstico por imagem
Neoplasias da Mama/prevenção & controle
Feminino
Implementação de Plano de Saúde
Política de Saúde
Seres Humanos
Meia-Idade
Atenção Primária à Saúde/métodos
Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde
Software
Telefone
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180306
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180306
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13142-017-0497-x


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[PMID]:28464922
[Au] Autor:Kennedy ADM; Torgerson DJ; Campbell MK; Grant AM
[Ad] Endereço:Health Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
[Ti] Título:Subversion of allocation concealment in a randomised controlled trial: a historical case study.
[So] Source:Trials;18(1):204, 2017 May 02.
[Is] ISSN:1745-6215
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: If the randomisation process within a trial is subverted, this can lead to selection bias that may invalidate the trial's result. To avoid this problem, it is recommended that some form of concealment should be put into place. Despite ongoing anecdotal concerns about their susceptibility to subversion, a surprising number of trials (over 10%) still use sealed opaque envelopes as the randomisation method of choice. This is likely due in part to the paucity of empirical data quantifying the potential effects of subversion. In this study we report a historical before and after study that compares the use of the sealed envelope method with a more secure centralised telephone allocation approach in order to provide such empirical evidence of the effects of subversion. METHODS: This was an opportunistic before and after study set within a multi-centre surgical trial, which involved 654 patients from 28 clinicians from 23 centres in the UK and Ireland. Two methods of randomly allocating subjects to alternative treatments were adopted: (a) a sealed envelope system administered locally, and (b) a centralised telephone system administered by the trial co-ordination centre. Key prognostic variables were compared between randomisation methods: (a) age at trial entry, a key prognostic factor in the study, and (b) the order in which 'randomisation envelopes' were matched to subjects. RESULTS: The median age of patients allocated to the experimental group with the sealed envelope system, was significantly lower both overall (59 vs 63 years, p < 0.01) and in particular for three clinicians (57 vs 72, p < 0.01; 33 vs 69, p < 0.001; 47 vs 72, p = 0.03). No differences in median age were found between the allocation groups for the centralised system. CONCLUSIONS: Due to inadequate allocation concealment with the sealed envelope system, the randomisation process was corrupted for patients recruited from three clinicians. Centralised randomisation ensures that treatment allocation is not only secure but seen to be secure. Where this proves to be impossible, allocation should at least be performed by an independent third party. Unless it is an absolute requirement, the use of sealed envelopes should be discontinued forthwith.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Confidencialidade
Distribuição Aleatória
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Distribuição por Idade
Fatores Etários
Idoso
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Viés de Seleção
Telefone
Reino Unido
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13063-017-1946-z


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[PMID]:29342498
[Au] Autor:Jacobson Vann JC; Jacobson RM; Coyne-Beasley T; Asafu-Adjei JK; Szilagyi PG
[Ad] Endereço:School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carrington Hall, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, 27599-7460.
[Ti] Título:Patient reminder and recall interventions to improve immunization rates.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD003941, 2018 01 18.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Immunization rates for children and adults are rising, but coverage levels have not reached optimal goals. As a result, vaccine-preventable diseases still occur. In an era of increasing complexity of immunization schedules, rising expectations about the performance of primary care, and large demands on primary care providers, it is important to understand and promote interventions that work in primary care settings to increase immunization coverage. One common theme across immunization programs in many nations involves the challenge of implementing a population-based approach and identifying all eligible recipients, for example the children who should receive the measles vaccine. However, this issue is gradually being addressed through the availability of immunization registries and electronic health records. A second common theme is identifying the best strategies to promote high vaccination rates. Three types of strategies have been studied: (1) patient-oriented interventions, such as patient reminder or recall, (2) provider interventions, and (3) system interventions, such as school laws. One of the most prominent intervention strategies, and perhaps best studied, involves patient reminder or recall systems. This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of various types of patient reminder and recall interventions to improve receipt of immunizations. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and CINAHL to January 2017. We also searched grey literature and trial registers to January 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series evaluating immunization-focused patient reminder or recall interventions in children, adolescents, and adults who receive immunizations in any setting. We included no-intervention control groups, standard practice activities that did not include immunization patient reminder or recall, media-based activities aimed at promoting immunizations, or simple practice-based awareness campaigns. We included receipt of any immunizations as eligible outcome measures, excluding special travel immunizations. We excluded patients who were hospitalized for the duration of the study period. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane and the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group. We present results for individual studies as relative rates using risk ratios, and risk differences for randomized trials, and as absolute changes in percentage points for controlled before-after studies. We present pooled results for randomized trials using the random-effects model. MAIN RESULTS: The 75 included studies involved child, adolescent, and adult participants in outpatient, community-based, primary care, and other settings in 10 countries.Patient reminder or recall interventions, including telephone and autodialer calls, letters, postcards, text messages, combination of mail or telephone, or a combination of patient reminder or recall with outreach, probably improve the proportion of participants who receive immunization (risk ratio (RR) of 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23 to 1.35; risk difference of 8%) based on moderate certainty evidence from 55 studies with 138,625 participants.Three types of single-method reminders improve receipt of immunizations based on high certainty evidence: the use of postcards (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.30; eight studies; 27,734 participants), text messages (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.44; six studies; 7772 participants), and autodialer (RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.32; five studies; 11,947 participants). Two types of single-method reminders probably improve receipt of immunizations based on moderate certainty evidence: the use of telephone calls (RR 1.75, 95% CI 1.20 to 2.54; seven studies; 9120 participants) and letters to patients (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.38; 27 studies; 81,100 participants).Based on high certainty evidence, reminders improve receipt of immunizations for childhood (RR 1.22, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.29; risk difference of 8%; 23 studies; 31,099 participants) and adolescent vaccinations (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.42; risk difference of 7%; 10 studies; 30,868 participants). Reminders probably improve receipt of vaccinations for childhood influenza (RR 1.51, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.99; risk difference of 22%; five studies; 9265 participants) and adult influenza (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.43; risk difference of 9%; 15 studies; 59,328 participants) based on moderate certainty evidence. They may improve receipt of vaccinations for adult pneumococcus, tetanus, hepatitis B, and other non-influenza vaccinations based on low certainty evidence although the confidence interval includes no effect of these interventions (RR 2.08, 95% CI 0.91 to 4.78; four studies; 8065 participants). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Patient reminder and recall systems, in primary care settings, are likely to be effective at improving the proportion of the target population who receive immunizations.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Imunização/utilização
Sistemas de Alerta
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Criança
Correspondência como Assunto
Seres Humanos
Programas de Imunização/organização & administração
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
Sistemas de Alerta/estatística & dados numéricos
Telefone/estatística & dados numéricos
Mensagem de Texto/estatística & dados numéricos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180118
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD003941.pub3


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[PMID]:29233271
[Au] Autor:Howell CK; Reveles KR; Knodel LC; Pattyn NR; Frei CR
[Ad] Endereço:College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX; Pharmacotherapy Education and Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. Electronic address: crystal.howell@emoryhealthcare.org.
[Ti] Título:Know your medicine: A novel student-led community service learning program.
[So] Source:Curr Pharm Teach Learn;9(3):353-359, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1877-1300
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:INTRODUCTION: The objective of this article is to describe the efforts of the student pharmacist organization called Know Your Medicine (KYM) as they conduct medication therapy management (MTM) for older adults and underserved communities. METHODS: Patients brought medications, immunization records, and health concerns to KYM events during academic years 2012-2013 and 2013-2014. Student pharmacists performed health screenings, created personalized medication records (PMR), made recommendations, created personal action plans (PAP), and conducted follow-up phone calls. RESULTS: Student pharmacists provided MTM services for a total of 107 patients. The mean duration of a KYM appointment was 62±21min, and student pharmacists provided a mean of 3.5±2.1 recommendations per patient. Patients had a mean age of 78±11 years, 4.5±3.2 disease states, 6.9±4.6 prescriptions, 1.9±1.9 OTC medications, and 2.8±2.6 vitamins or herbals. At the time of the follow-up phone call, a mean of 2.6±1.9 recommendations per patient had been followed. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Student pharmacists successfully implemented a new MTM program for older adults and underserved communities. This program can serve as an example of how other pharmacy colleges and schools might implement MTM training and real-world MTM experience for their student pharmacists.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Conduta do Tratamento Medicamentoso/organização & administração
Conduta do Tratamento Medicamentoso/estatística & dados numéricos
Estudantes de Farmácia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Relações Comunidade-Instituição
Comorbidade
Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos
Efeitos Colaterais e Reações Adversas Relacionados a Medicamentos/prevenção & controle
Educação em Farmácia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde
Polimedicação
Seguridade Social
Telefone
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29320513
[Au] Autor:Grossman D; Baum SE; Andjelic D; Tatum C; Torres G; Fuentes L; Friedman J
[Ad] Endereço:Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH), Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California San Francisco, Oakland, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:A harm-reduction model of abortion counseling about misoprostol use in Peru with telephone and in-person follow-up: A cohort study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0189195, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: In Peru, abortion is legal only to preserve the life and health of the woman. A non-profit clinic system in Peru implemented a harm-reduction model for women with unwanted pregnancy that included pre-abortion care with instructions about misoprostol use and post-abortion care; they started offering telephone follow-up for clients in 2011. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the harm-reduction model, and to compare outcomes by type of follow-up obtained. METHODS: Between January 2012 and March 2013, 500 adult women seeking harm-reduction services were recruited into the study. Telephone surveys were conducted approximately four weeks after their initial harm-reduction counseling session with 262 women (response rate 52%); 9 participants were excluded. The survey focused on whether women pursued an abortion, and if so, what their experience was. Demographic and clinical data were also extracted from clinic records. RESULTS: Eighty-six percent of participants took misoprostol; among those taking misoprostol, 89% reported a complete abortion at the time of the survey. Twenty-two percent obtained an aspiration after taking misoprostol and 8% self-reported adverse events including hemorrhage without transfusion, infection, or severe pain. Among women who took misoprostol, 46% reported receiving in-person follow-up (in some cases both telephone and in-person), 34% received telephone only, and 20% did not report receiving any form of follow-up. Those who had in-person follow-up with the counselor were most likely to report a complete abortion (<0.001). Satisfaction with both types of follow-up was very high, with 81%-89% reporting being very satisfied. CONCLUSIONS: Liberalization of restrictive abortion laws is associated with improvements in health outcomes, but the process of legal reform is often lengthy. In the interim, giving women information about evidence-based regimens of misoprostol, as well as offering a range of follow-up options to ensure high quality post-abortion care, may reduce the risks associated with unsafe abortion.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Abortivos não Esteroides/administração & dosagem
Redução do Dano
Misoprostol/administração & dosagem
Telefone
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Estudos de Coortes
Aconselhamento
Feminino
Seguimentos
Seres Humanos
Meia-Idade
Peru
Gravidez
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal); 0E43V0BB57 (Misoprostol)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180129
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180129
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189195


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[PMID]:29240349
[Au] Autor:Tackitt HM; Eaton SH; Lentz AC
[Ti] Título:Nurse-Initiated Telephone Follow Up after Ureteroscopic Stone Surgery.
[So] Source:Urol Nurs;36(6):283-8, 2016 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1053-816X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This article presents findings of a quality improvement (QI) project using the DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) model designed to decrease the rate of emergency department (ED) visits and nurse advice line calls after ureteroscopic stone surgery. Results indicated that nurse-initiated follow- up phone calls can decrease ED visits.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Assistência ao Convalescente
Cálculos Renais/cirurgia
Enfermagem em Nefrologia
Dor Pós-Operatória/enfermagem
Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/enfermagem
Telefone
Cálculos Ureterais/cirurgia
Ureteroscopia
Infecções Urinárias/enfermagem
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência/utilização
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Melhoria de Qualidade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180123
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180123
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171215
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29231693
[Au] Autor:Bush DM
[Ti] Título:Telephones and Cowbells.
[So] Source:J Indiana Dent Assoc;95(2):10-1, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0019-6568
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Licenciamento em Odontologia
Sociedades Odontológicas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Indiana
Telefone
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180115
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180115
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:D
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171213
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28448784
[Au] Autor:Abughosh S; Wang X; Serna O; Esse T; Mann A; Masilamani S; Holstad MM; Essien EJ; Fleming M
[Ad] Endereço:1 Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, Texas.
[Ti] Título:A Motivational Interviewing Intervention by Pharmacy Students to Improve Medication Adherence.
[So] Source:J Manag Care Spec Pharm;23(5):549-560, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:2376-1032
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with comorbid hypertension (HTN) are at a higher risk of developing microvascular and macrovascular DM complications. Through guideline-driven recommendations, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are highly recommended for these patients. Unfortunately, medication adherence to these products, though crucial to achieving therapeutic benefit, is frequently suboptimal. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a patient-centered collaborative communication style that is used to strengthen internal motivation for change that may prove effective in enhancing adherence. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of an MI telephone intervention conducted by pharmacy students in improving adherence to ACEIs/ARBs among Medicare Advantage Plan (MAP) patients with both DM and HTN. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted among patients enrolled in a Texas MAP. Medical claims data were used to identify patients with DM and HTN, and pharmacy claims were observed to recognize those who filled either an ACEI or an ARB during June 2014. Patients with a 6-month proportion of days covered (PDC) < 0.80 in the previous 6 months were determined nonadherent, and 75% of those were randomly selected to serve as potential subjects for the intervention, while 25% were randomly selected to serve as potential subjects for the control group. The intervention was a telephone call by a pharmacy student on rotation at the health plan, and 5 monthly follow-up calls. Before implementing calls, participating students attended a 3-day MI training course, where their proficiency for MI skills was evaluated. Refill data during the 6-month postintervention were evaluated to examine the intervention effect measured on 3 outcomes: PDC; PDC ≥ 0.80 versus < 0.80; and discontinuation versus continuation. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models were constructed to adjust for any imbalances in baseline characteristics, including age, gender, number of other medications, regimen complexity, health low-income subsidy status, prescriber specialty, comorbidities, 6-month previous hospitalization, baseline 6-month PDC, and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services risk score. RESULTS: A total of 11 students participated in the intervention implementation. Patients receiving calls were randomly selected from those potential subjects for the intervention arm until a target of 250 was reached; 500 controls were randomly selected from the potential subjects for the control arm. The final cohort included in multivariate models consisted of 743 patients. Patients completing the initial call and at least 2 follow-ups were less likely to discontinue (OR = 0.29; 95% CI = 0.15-0.54; P < 0.001) and more likely to be adherent in the linear regression model (ß = 0.0604, P < 0.001) and the logistic regression model (OR = 1.53; 95% CI = 1.02-2.28; P = 0.009). Other factors significantly associated with better adherence included higher baseline PDC and number of medications. Depression status was significantly associated with lower adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Patients receiving 2 or more calls had significantly better adherence and less discontinuation during the 6 months following initial calls compared with those who did not receive calls. This finding indicates that an MI-based telephone intervention by pharmacy students may be a promising intervention to improve adherence. Future research should examine the sustainability of the intervention effect for longer time periods and its influence on associated clinical outcomes. DISCLOSURES: This project was supported by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America Foundation (PhRMA). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of PhRMA. The funding agency was not involved in research design, analysis, or reporting results. Funding was obtained by Abughosh. Holstad provided a consultation regarding the MI guide and provided the MI training. Study concept and design were contributed by Abughosh and Fleming, along with Serna, Esse, and Holstad. Serna, Esse, Mann, Holstad, and Masilamani collected the data, and data interpretation was performed by Abughosh, Wong, and Esse. The manuscript was written by Abughosh, Wong, and Esse and revised by Masilamani and Holstad, along with the other authors.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adesão à Medicação
Entrevista Motivacional/métodos
Assistência Farmacêutica/organização & administração
Estudantes de Farmácia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Antagonistas de Receptores de Angiotensina/administração & dosagem
Inibidores da Enzima Conversora de Angiotensina/administração & dosagem
Diabetes Mellitus/tratamento farmacológico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Hipertensão/tratamento farmacológico
Modelos Lineares
Modelos Logísticos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Estudos Prospectivos
Telefone
Texas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists); 0 (Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180111
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180111
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170428
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.18553/jmcp.2017.23.5.549


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[PMID]:29183882
[Au] Autor:Eccles A; Atherton H
[Ad] Endereço:Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
[Ti] Título:Automated telephone communication systems may have the potential to play a positive role in healthcare.
[So] Source:Evid Based Nurs;21(1):23, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1468-9618
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comunicação
Telefone
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Assistência à Saúde
Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW; COMMENT
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180103
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180103
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM; N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/eb-2017-102707


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[PMID]:25367163
[Au] Autor:Beebe LH; Smith K; Phillips C; Velligan D; Tavakoli A
[Ti] Título:The Long-Term Effects of Cellular Telephone-Delivered Telephone Intervention Problem Solving (TIPS) for Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders (SSDs): Rationale and Design.
[So] Source:Clin Schizophr Relat Psychoses;11(3):164-171, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1935-1232
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Adesão à Medicação/psicologia
Avaliação de Resultados (Cuidados de Saúde)
Resolução de Problemas/fisiologia
Esquizofrenia/terapia
Telefone
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Antipsicóticos/administração & dosagem
Estudos de Viabilidade
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde
Sistemas de Alerta
Projetos de Pesquisa
Esquizofrenia/tratamento farmacológico
Autoeficácia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Antipsychotic Agents)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171128
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171128
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:141105
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3371/CSRP.BESM.103114



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