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[PMID]:29431353
[Au] Autor:Yashchenko SG; Rybalko
[Ti] Título:[Morphological structure of rat epiphysis exposed to electromagnetic radiation from communication devices].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(10):977-9, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] País de publicação:Russia (Federation)
[La] Idioma:rus
[Ab] Resumo:Pineal gland is one of the most important components of homeostasis - the supporting system of the body. It participates in the launch of stress responses, restriction of their development, prevention of adverse effects on the body. There was proved an impact of electromagnetic radiation on the epiphysis. However, morphological changes in the epiphysis under exposure to electromagnetic radiation of modern communication devices are studied not sufficiently. For the time present the population is daily exposed to electromagnetic radiation, including local irradiation on the brain. These date determined the task of this research - the study of the structure of rat pineal gland under the exposure to electromagnetic radiation from personal computers and mobile phones. These date determined the task of this research - the study of the structure of rat pineal gland under the exposure to electromagnetic radiation from personal computers and mobile phones. Performed transmission electron microscopy revealed signs of degeneration of dark and light pinealocytes. These signs were manifested in the development of a complex of general and specific morphological changes. There was revealed the appearance of signs of aging and depletion transmission electron microscopy both in light and dark pinealocytes. These signs were manifested in the accumulation of lipofuscin granules and electron-dense "brain sand", the disappearance of nucleoli, cytoplasm vacuolization and mitochondrial cristae enlightenment.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Telefone Celular
Campos Eletromagnéticos/efeitos adversos
Epífises
Microcomputadores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Radiação Eletromagnética
Epífises/diagnóstico por imagem
Epífises/patologia
Epífises/efeitos da radiação
Modelos Animais
Ratos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180309
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180309
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 14150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28463161
[Au] Autor:Basch E; Pugh SL; Dueck AC; Mitchell SA; Berk L; Fogh S; Rogak LJ; Gatewood M; Reeve BB; Mendoza TR; O'Mara AM; Denicoff AM; Minasian LM; Bennett AV; Setser A; Schrag D; Roof K; Moore JK; Gergel T; Stephans K; Rimner A; DeNittis A; Bruner DW
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Electronic address: ebasch@med.unc.edu.
[Ti] Título:Feasibility of Patient Reporting of Symptomatic Adverse Events via the Patient-Reported Outcomes Version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE) in a Chemoradiotherapy Cooperative Group Multicenter Clinical Trial.
[So] Source:Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys;98(2):409-418, 2017 06 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-355X
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility of measuring symptomatic adverse events (AEs) in a multicenter clinical trial using the National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients enrolled in NRG Oncology's RTOG 1012 (Prophylactic Manuka Honey for Reduction of Chemoradiation Induced Esophagitis-Related Pain during Treatment of Lung Cancer) were asked to self-report 53 PRO-CTCAE items representing 30 symptomatic AEs at 6 time points (baseline; weekly ×4 during treatment; 12 weeks after treatment). Reporting was conducted via wireless tablet computers in clinic waiting areas. Compliance was defined as the proportion of visits when an expected PRO-CTCAE assessment was completed. RESULTS: Among 226 study sites participating in RTOG 1012, 100% completed 35-minute PRO-CTCAE training for clinical research associates (CRAs); 80 sites enrolled patients, of which 34 (43%) required tablet computers to be provided. All 152 patients in RTOG 1012 agreed to self-report using the PRO-CTCAE (median age 66 years; 47% female; 84% white). Median time for CRAs to learn the system was 60 minutes (range, 30-240 minutes), and median time for CRAs to teach a patient to self-report was 10 minutes (range, 2-60 minutes). Compliance was high, particularly during active treatment, when patients self-reported at 86% of expected time points, although compliance was lower after treatment (72%). Common reasons for noncompliance were institutional errors, such as forgetting to provide computers to participants; patients missing clinic visits; Internet connectivity; and patients feeling "too sick." CONCLUSIONS: Most patients enrolled in a multicenter chemoradiotherapy trial were willing and able to self-report symptomatic AEs at visits using tablet computers. Minimal effort was required by local site staff to support this system. The observed causes of missing data may be obviated by allowing patients to self-report electronically between visits, and by using central compliance monitoring. These approaches are being incorporated into ongoing studies.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Quimiorradioterapia/efeitos adversos
Esofagite/complicações
Neoplasias Pulmonares/terapia
Microcomputadores/estatística & dados numéricos
Dor/prevenção & controle
Cooperação do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos
Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente
Autorrelato/utilização
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Apiterapia/métodos
Transtornos de Deglutição/etiologia
Transtornos de Deglutição/terapia
Estudos de Viabilidade
Feminino
Mel
Seres Humanos
Internet
Masculino
Meia-Idade
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Avaliação de Sintomas/estatística & dados numéricos
Fatores de Tempo
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE II; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180228
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180228
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  3 / 14150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29360872
[Au] Autor:Pugliese M; Ramsay T; Johnson D; Dowlatshahi D
[Ad] Endereço:School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
[Ti] Título:Mobile tablet-based therapies following stroke: A systematic scoping review of administrative methods and patient experiences.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191566, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke survivors are often left with deficits requiring rehabilitation to recover function and yet, many are unable to access rehabilitative therapies. Mobile tablet-based therapies (MTBTs) may be a resource-efficient means of improving access to timely rehabilitation. It is unclear what MTBTs have been attempted following stroke, how they were administered, and how patients experienced the therapies. The review summarizes studies of MTBTs following stroke in terms of administrative methods and patient experiences to inform treatment feasibility. METHODS: Articles were eligible if they reported the results of an MTBT attempted with stroke participants. Six research databases were searched along with grey literature sources, trial registries, and article references. Intervention administration details and patient experiences were summarized. RESULTS: The search returned 903 articles of which 23 were eligible for inclusion. Most studies were small, observational, and enrolled chronic stroke patients. Interventions commonly targeted communication, cognition, or fine-motor skills. Therapies tended to be personalized based on patient deficits using commercially available applications. The complexity of therapy instructions, fine-motor requirements, and unreliability of internet or cellular connections were identified as common barriers to tablet-based care. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke patients responded positively to MTBTs in both the inpatient and home settings. However, some support from therapists or caregivers may be required for patients to overcome barriers to care. Feasibility studies should continue to identify the administrative methods that minimize barriers to care and maximize patient adherence to prescribed therapy regiments.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Microcomputadores/utilização
Reabilitação do Acidente Vascular Cerebral/métodos
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Destreza Motora
Cooperação do Paciente
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/fisiopatologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180124
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191566


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[PMID]:28282750
[Au] Autor:Jones MJ; Peeling P; Dawson B; Halson S; Miller J; Dunican I; Clarke M; Goodman C; Eastwood P
[Ad] Endereço:a Department of Sport Science, Exercise and Health, School of Human Sciences , The University of Western Australia , Crawley , WA , Australia.
[Ti] Título:Evening electronic device use: The effects on alertness, sleep and next-day physical performance in athletes.
[So] Source:J Sports Sci;36(2):162-170, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1466-447X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different types of tasks performed with or without an electronic device (tablet) on pre-sleep alertness, subsequent sleep quality and next-day athletic performance. Eight highly trained netball players attended a sleep laboratory for pre-sleep testing, polysomnographic sleep monitoring and next-day physical performance testing on 5 separate occasions (1 familiarisation and 4 experimental sessions). For 2 h prior to bedtime, athletes completed cognitively stimulating tasks (puzzles) or passive tasks (reading) with or without a tablet. Sleepiness tended to be greater after reading compared to completing puzzles without a tablet (d = 0.80), but not with a tablet. Melatonin concentration increased more so after reading compared to completing puzzles on a tablet (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in sleep quality or quantity or next-day athletic performance between any of the conditions. These data suggest that using a tablet for 2 h prior to sleep does not negatively affect subsequent sleep or next-day performance in athletes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Desempenho Atlético
Atenção
Microcomputadores/utilização
Sono
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Temperatura Corporal
Orelha Média/fisiologia
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Hidrocortisona/metabolismo
Melatonina/metabolismo
Salvia/metabolismo
Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
JL5DK93RCL (Melatonin); WI4X0X7BPJ (Hydrocortisone)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170312
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/02640414.2017.1287936


  5 / 14150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29049280
[Au] Autor:Geissmann Q; Garcia Rodriguez L; Beckwith EJ; French AS; Jamasb AR; Gilestro GF
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Título:Ethoscopes: An open platform for high-throughput ethomics.
[So] Source:PLoS Biol;15(10):e2003026, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1545-7885
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Here, we present the use of ethoscopes, which are machines for high-throughput analysis of behavior in Drosophila and other animals. Ethoscopes provide a software and hardware solution that is reproducible and easily scalable. They perform, in real-time, tracking and profiling of behavior by using a supervised machine learning algorithm, are able to deliver behaviorally triggered stimuli to flies in a feedback-loop mode, and are highly customizable and open source. Ethoscopes can be built easily by using 3D printing technology and rely on Raspberry Pi microcomputers and Arduino boards to provide affordable and flexible hardware. All software and construction specifications are available at http://lab.gilest.ro/ethoscope.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Animal/fisiologia
Drosophila melanogaster/fisiologia
Etologia/instrumentação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Animais
Etologia/métodos
Aprendizado de Máquina
Microcomputadores
Impressão Tridimensional
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
Software
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171105
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171105
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171020
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.2003026


  6 / 14150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28644874
[Au] Autor:Advani M; Weile DS
[Ad] Endereço:Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Position and orientation inference via on-board triangulation.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0180089, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This work proposes a new approach to determine the spatial location and orientation of an object using measurements performed on the object itself. The on-board triangulation algorithm we outline could be implemented in lieu of, or in addition to, well-known alternatives such as Global Positioning System (GPS) or standard triangulation, since both of these correspond to significantly different geometric pictures and necessitate different hardware and algorithms. We motivate the theory by describing situations in which on-board triangulation would be useful and even preferable to standard methods. The on-board triangulation algorithm we outline involves utilizing dumb beacons which broadcast omnidirectional single frequency radio waves, and smart antenna arrays on the object itself to infer the direction of the beacon signals, which may be used for onboard calculation of the position and orientation of the object. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method and its noise tolerance.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Algoritmos
Radiação Eletromagnética
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Simulação por Computador
Sistemas de Informação Geográfica
Microcomputadores
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170918
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170918
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170624
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0180089


  7 / 14150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28535331
[Au] Autor:McCabe C; McCann M; Brady AM
[Ad] Endereço:School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
[Ti] Título:Computer and mobile technology interventions for self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;5:CD011425, 2017 05 23.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by airflow obstruction due to an abnormal inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles or gases, for example, cigarette smoke. The pattern of care for people with moderate to very severe COPD often involves regular lengthy hospital admissions, which result in high healthcare costs and an undesirable effect on quality of life. Research over the past decade has focused on innovative methods for developing enabling and assistive technologies that facilitate patient self-management. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions delivered by computer and by mobile technology versus face-to-face or hard copy/digital documentary-delivered interventions, or both, in facilitating, supporting, and sustaining self-management among people with COPD. SEARCH METHODS: In November 2016, we searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register (CAGR), which contains trial reports identified through systematic searches of bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO, and we handsearched respiratory journals and meeting abstracts. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials that measured effects of remote and Web 2.0-based interventions defined as technologies including personal computers (PCs) and applications (apps) for mobile technology, such as iPad, Android tablets, smart phones, and Skype, on behavioural change towards self-management of COPD. Comparator interventions included face-to-face and/or hard copy/digital documentary educational/self-management support. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors (CMcC and MMcC) independently screened titles, abstracts, and full-text study reports for inclusion. Two review authors (CMcC and AMB) independently assessed study quality and extracted data. We expressed continuous data as mean differences (MDs) and standardised mean differences (SMDs) for studies using different outcome measurement scales. MAIN RESULTS: We included in our review three studies (Moy 2015; Tabak 2013; Voncken-Brewster 2015) with a total of 1580 randomised participants. From Voncken-Brewster 2015, we included the subgroup of individuals with a diagnosis of COPD (284 participants) and excluded those at risk of COPD who had not received a diagnosis (1023 participants). As a result, the total population available for analysis included 557 participants; 319 received smart technology to support self-management and 238 received face-to-face verbal/written or digital information and education about self-management. The average age of participants was 64 years. We included more men than women because the sample from one of the studies consisted of war veterans, most of whom were men. These studies measured five of our nine defined outcomes. None of these studies included outcomes such as self-efficacy, cost-effectiveness, functional capacity, lung function, or anxiety and depression.All three studies included our primary outcome - health-related quality of life (HRQoL) as measured by the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) or St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). One study reported our other primary outcomes - hospital admissions and acute exacerbations. Two studies included our secondary outcome of physical activity as measured by daily step counts. One study addressed smoking by providing a narrative analysis. Only one study reported adverse events and noted significant differences between groups, with 43 events noted in the intervention group and eight events in the control group (P = 0.001). For studies that measured outcomes at week four, month four, and month six, the effect of smart technology on self-management and subsequent HRQoL in terms of symptoms and health status was significantly better than when participants received face-to-face/digital and/or written support for self-management of COPD (SMD -0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.40 to -0.03; P = 0.02). The single study that reported HRQoL at 12 months described no significant between-group differences (MD 1.1, 95% CI -2.2 to 4.5; P = 0.50). Also, hospitalisations (logistic regression odds ratio (OR) 1.6, 95% CI 0.8 to 3.2; P = 0.19) and exacerbations (logistic regression OR 1.4, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.8; P = 0.33) did not differ between groups in the single study that reported these outcomes at 12 months. The activity level of people with COPD at week four, month four, and month six was significantly higher when smart technology was used than when face-to-face/digital and/or written support was provided (MD 864.06 daily steps between groups, 95% CI 369.66 to 1358.46; P = 0.0006). The only study that measured activity levels at 12 months reported no significant differences between groups (mean -108, 95% CI -720 to 505; P = 0.73). Participant engagement in this study was not sustained between four and 12 months. The only study that included smoking cessation found no significant treatment effect (OR 1.06, 95%CI 0.43 to 2.66; P = 0.895). Meta-analyses showed no significant heterogeneity between studies (Chi² = 0.39, P = 0.82; I² = 0% and Chi² = 0.01, P = 0.91; I² = 0%, respectively). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Although our review suggests that interventions aimed at facilitating, supporting, and sustaining self-managment in people with COPD and delivered via smart technology significantly improved HRQoL and levels of activity up to six months compared with interventions given through face-to-face/digital and/or written support, no firm conclusions can be drawn. This improvement may not be sustained over a long duration. The only included study that measured outcomes up to 12 months highlighted the need to ensure sustained engagement with the technology over time. Limited evidence suggests that using computer and mobile technology for self-management for people with COPD is not harmful and may be more beneficial for some people than for others, for example, those with an interest in using technology may derive greater benefit.The evidence, provided by three studies at high risk of bias, is of poor quality and is insufficient for advising healthcare professionals, service providers, and members of the public with COPD about the health benefits of using smart technology as an effective means of supporting, encouraging, and sustaining self-management. Further research that focuses on outcomes relevant to different stages of COPD is needed. Researchers should provide clear information on how self-management is assessed and should include longitudinal measures that allow comment on behavioural change.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Microcomputadores
Aplicativos Móveis
Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia
Autocuidado/métodos
Smartphone
Terapia Assistida por Computador/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Progressão da Doença
Exercício
Feminino
Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Educação de Pacientes como Assunto
Qualidade de Vida
Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/estatística & dados numéricos
Fatores de Tempo
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170815
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170815
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170524
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD011425.pub2


  8 / 14150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28447637
[Au] Autor:Ajemian R
[Ad] Endereço:Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
[Ti] Título:Neurosurgery: Gentler alternatives to chips in the brain.
[So] Source:Nature;544(7651):416, 2017 04 26.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo
Neurocirurgia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Neoplasias Encefálicas
Seres Humanos
Microcomputadores
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170714
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170714
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170428
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/544416c


  9 / 14150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28438727
[Au] Autor:Mantokoudis G; Koller R; Guignard J; Caversaccio M; Kompis M; Senn P
[Ad] Endereço:lnselspital, Bern University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
[Ti] Título:Influence of Telecommunication Modality, Internet Transmission Quality, and Accessories on Speech Perception in Cochlear Implant Users.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(4):e135, 2017 Apr 24.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Telecommunication is limited or even impossible for more than one-thirds of all cochlear implant (CI) users. OBJECTIVE: We sought therefore to study the impact of voice quality on speech perception with voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) under real and adverse network conditions. METHODS: Telephone speech perception was assessed in 19 CI users (15-69 years, average 42 years), using the German HSM (Hochmair-Schulz-Moser) sentence test comparing Skype and conventional telephone (public switched telephone networks, PSTN) transmission using a personal computer (PC) and a digital enhanced cordless telecommunications (DECT) telephone dual device. Five different Internet transmission quality modes and four accessories (PC speakers, headphones, 3.5 mm jack audio cable, and induction loop) were compared. As a secondary outcome, the subjective perceived voice quality was assessed using the mean opinion score (MOS). RESULTS: Speech telephone perception was significantly better (median 91.6%, P<.001) with Skype compared with PSTN (median 42.5%) under optimal conditions. Skype calls under adverse network conditions (data packet loss > 15%) were not superior to conventional telephony. In addition, there were no significant differences between the tested accessories (P>.05) using a PC. Coupling a Skype DECT phone device with an audio cable to the CI, however, resulted in higher speech perception (median 65%) and subjective MOS scores (3.2) than using PSTN (median 7.5%, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Skype calls significantly improve speech perception for CI users compared with conventional telephony under real network conditions. Listening accessories do not further improve listening experience. Current Skype DECT telephone devices do not fully offer technical advantages in voice quality.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Implantes Cocleares
Internet/instrumentação
Internet/normas
Inteligibilidade da Fala
Percepção da Fala
Telecomunicações/instrumentação
Telecomunicações/normas
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Linguagem
Masculino
Microcomputadores
Meia-Idade
Telefone
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171026
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171026
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170426
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.6954


  10 / 14150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28369055
[Au] Autor:Ahn C; Lee J; Oh J; Song Y; Chee Y; Lim TH; Kang H; Shin H
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Título:Effectiveness of feedback with a smartwatch for high-quality chest compressions during adult cardiac arrest: A randomized controlled simulation study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(4):e0169046, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for using smartwatches with a built-in accelerometer as feedback devices for high-quality chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, to the best of our knowledge, no previous study has reported the effects of this feedback on chest compressions in action. A randomized, parallel controlled study of 40 senior medical students was conducted to examine the effect of chest compression feedback via a smartwatch during cardiopulmonary resuscitation of manikins. A feedback application was developed for the smartwatch, in which visual feedback was provided for chest compression depth and rate. Vibrations from smartwatch were used to indicate the chest compression rate. The participants were randomly allocated to the intervention and control groups, and they performed chest compressions on manikins for 2 min continuously with or without feedback, respectively. The proportion of accurate chest compression depth (≥5 cm and ≤6 cm) was assessed as the primary outcome, and the chest compression depth, chest compression rate, and the proportion of complete chest decompression (≤1 cm of residual leaning) were recorded as secondary outcomes. The proportion of accurate chest compression depth in the intervention group was significantly higher than that in the control group (64.6±7.8% versus 43.1±28.3%; p = 0.02). The mean compression depth and rate and the proportion of complete chest decompressions did not differ significantly between the two groups (all p>0.05). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation-related feedback via a smartwatch could provide assistance with respect to the ideal range of chest compression depth, and this can easily be applied to patients with out-of-hospital arrest by rescuers who wear smartwatches.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Reanimação Cardiopulmonar/métodos
Parada Cardíaca/terapia
Manequins
Microcomputadores
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Reanimação Cardiopulmonar/educação
Reanimação Cardiopulmonar/normas
Educação de Graduação em Medicina
Retroalimentação Sensorial
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
República da Coreia
Smartphone
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170906
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170906
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170404
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0169046



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