Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : L01.559.423.557 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 19003 [refinar]
Mostrando: 1 .. 10   no formato [Detalhado]

página 1 de 1901 ir para página                         

  1 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28458050
[Au] Autor:Rieth CA; Huber DE
[Ad] Endereço:Pacific Science and Engineering Group, Inc, United States.
[Ti] Título:Comparing different kinds of words and word-word relations to test an habituation model of priming.
[So] Source:Cogn Psychol;95:79-104, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1095-5623
[Cp] País de publicação:Netherlands
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Huber and O'Reilly (2003) proposed that neural habituation exists to solve a temporal parsing problem, minimizing blending between one word and the next when words are visually presented in rapid succession. They developed a neural dynamics habituation model, explaining the finding that short duration primes produce positive priming whereas long duration primes produce negative repetition priming. The model contains three layers of processing, including a visual input layer, an orthographic layer, and a lexical-semantic layer. The predicted effect of prime duration depends both on this assumed representational hierarchy and the assumption that synaptic depression underlies habituation. The current study tested these assumptions by comparing different kinds of words (e.g., words versus non-words) and different kinds of word-word relations (e.g., associative versus repetition). For each experiment, the predictions of the original model were compared to an alternative model with different representational assumptions. Experiment 1 confirmed the prediction that non-words and inverted words require longer prime durations to eliminate positive repetition priming (i.e., a slower transition from positive to negative priming). Experiment 2 confirmed the prediction that associative priming increases and then decreases with increasing prime duration, but remains positive even with long duration primes. Experiment 3 replicated the effects of repetition and associative priming using a within-subjects design and combined these effects by examining target words that were expected to repeat (e.g., viewing the target word 'BACK' after the prime phrase 'back to'). These results support the originally assumed representational hierarchy and more generally the role of habituation in temporal parsing and priming.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Habituação Psicofisiológica/fisiologia
Modelos Psicológicos
Psicolinguística
Priming de Repetição/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Seres Humanos
Leitura
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180307
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180307
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
[PMID]:29451669
[Au] Autor:Celeste LC; Pereira ES; Pereira NRR; Alves LM
[Ad] Endereço:Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brasil.
[Ti] Título:Prosodic parameters of reading in 2nd to 5th grade students.
[Ti] Título:Parâmetros prosódicos de leitura em escolares do segundo ao quinto ano do ensino fundamental..
[So] Source:Codas;30(1):e20170034, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] País de publicação:Brazil
[La] Idioma:eng; por
[Ab] Resumo:Purpose Characterize and compare melodic variation and reading speed and verify their evolution throughout the development of schooling. Methods The reading of 78 Elementary School (2nd to 5th grade) students was analyzed using the Praat program with regards to the parameters of melodic variation (F0) and reading speed (Duration). Statistical measures (mean and standard deviation) were taken and the Student´s t-test was applied at significance level of 5%. Results Melodic variation and reading speed increased as schooling progressed, especially during 5th grade. Conclusion Melodic variation increases as schooling progresses, mainly during 5th grade. First minute of reading analysis is sufficient to assess reading speed, not being necessary to analyze the full text.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Leitura
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Criança
Compreensão
Avaliação Educacional
Seres Humanos
Linguagem
Fala/fisiologia
Estudantes
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180306
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180306
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180217
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  3 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
Texto completo
[PMID]:29376563
[Au] Autor:Martin A; Booth JN; Laird Y; Sproule J; Reilly JJ; Saunders DH
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, UK, EH8 9AG.
[Ti] Título:Physical activity, diet and other behavioural interventions for improving cognition and school achievement in children and adolescents with obesity or overweight.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD009728, 2018 01 29.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The global prevalence of childhood and adolescent obesity is high. Lifestyle changes towards a healthy diet, increased physical activity and reduced sedentary activities are recommended to prevent and treat obesity. Evidence suggests that changing these health behaviours can benefit cognitive function and school achievement in children and adolescents in general. There are various theoretical mechanisms that suggest that children and adolescents with excessive body fat may benefit particularly from these interventions. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether lifestyle interventions (in the areas of diet, physical activity, sedentary behaviour and behavioural therapy) improve school achievement, cognitive function (e.g. executive functions) and/or future success in children and adolescents with obesity or overweight, compared with standard care, waiting-list control, no treatment, or an attention placebo control group. SEARCH METHODS: In February 2017, we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE and 15 other databases. We also searched two trials registries, reference lists, and handsearched one journal from inception. We also contacted researchers in the field to obtain unpublished data. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of behavioural interventions for weight management in children and adolescents with obesity or overweight. We excluded studies in children and adolescents with medical conditions known to affect weight status, school achievement and cognitive function. We also excluded self- and parent-reported outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Four review authors independently selected studies for inclusion. Two review authors extracted data, assessed quality and risks of bias, and evaluated the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We contacted study authors to obtain additional information. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Where the same outcome was assessed across different intervention types, we reported standardised effect sizes for findings from single-study and multiple-study analyses to allow comparison of intervention effects across intervention types. To ease interpretation of the effect size, we also reported the mean difference of effect sizes for single-study outcomes. MAIN RESULTS: We included 18 studies (59 records) of 2384 children and adolescents with obesity or overweight. Eight studies delivered physical activity interventions, seven studies combined physical activity programmes with healthy lifestyle education, and three studies delivered dietary interventions. We included five RCTs and 13 cluster-RCTs. The studies took place in 10 different countries. Two were carried out in children attending preschool, 11 were conducted in primary/elementary school-aged children, four studies were aimed at adolescents attending secondary/high school and one study included primary/elementary and secondary/high school-aged children. The number of studies included for each outcome was low, with up to only three studies per outcome. The quality of evidence ranged from high to very low and 17 studies had a high risk of bias for at least one item. None of the studies reported data on additional educational support needs and adverse events.Compared to standard practice, analyses of physical activity-only interventions suggested high-quality evidence for improved mean cognitive executive function scores. The mean difference (MD) was 5.00 scale points higher in an after-school exercise group compared to standard practice (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68 to 9.32; scale mean 100, standard deviation 15; 116 children, 1 study). There was no statistically significant beneficial effect in favour of the intervention for mathematics, reading, or inhibition control. The standardised mean difference (SMD) for mathematics was 0.49 (95% CI -0.04 to 1.01; 2 studies, 255 children, moderate-quality evidence) and for reading was 0.10 (95% CI -0.30 to 0.49; 2 studies, 308 children, moderate-quality evidence). The MD for inhibition control was -1.55 scale points (95% CI -5.85 to 2.75; scale range 0 to 100; SMD -0.15, 95% CI -0.58 to 0.28; 1 study, 84 children, very low-quality evidence). No data were available for average achievement across subjects taught at school.There was no evidence of a beneficial effect of physical activity interventions combined with healthy lifestyle education on average achievement across subjects taught at school, mathematics achievement, reading achievement or inhibition control. The MD for average achievement across subjects taught at school was 6.37 points lower in the intervention group compared to standard practice (95% CI -36.83 to 24.09; scale mean 500, scale SD 70; SMD -0.18, 95% CI -0.93 to 0.58; 1 study, 31 children, low-quality evidence). The effect estimate for mathematics achievement was SMD 0.02 (95% CI -0.19 to 0.22; 3 studies, 384 children, very low-quality evidence), for reading achievement SMD 0.00 (95% CI -0.24 to 0.24; 2 studies, 284 children, low-quality evidence), and for inhibition control SMD -0.67 (95% CI -1.50 to 0.16; 2 studies, 110 children, very low-quality evidence). No data were available for the effect of combined physical activity and healthy lifestyle education on cognitive executive functions.There was a moderate difference in the average achievement across subjects taught at school favouring interventions targeting the improvement of the school food environment compared to standard practice in adolescents with obesity (SMD 0.46, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.66; 2 studies, 382 adolescents, low-quality evidence), but not with overweight. Replacing packed school lunch with a nutrient-rich diet in addition to nutrition education did not improve mathematics (MD -2.18, 95% CI -5.83 to 1.47; scale range 0 to 69; SMD -0.26, 95% CI -0.72 to 0.20; 1 study, 76 children, low-quality evidence) and reading achievement (MD 1.17, 95% CI -4.40 to 6.73; scale range 0 to 108; SMD 0.13, 95% CI -0.35 to 0.61; 1 study, 67 children, low-quality evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Despite the large number of childhood and adolescent obesity treatment trials, we were only able to partially assess the impact of obesity treatment interventions on school achievement and cognitive abilities. School and community-based physical activity interventions as part of an obesity prevention or treatment programme can benefit executive functions of children with obesity or overweight specifically. Similarly, school-based dietary interventions may benefit general school achievement in children with obesity. These findings might assist health and education practitioners to make decisions related to promoting physical activity and healthy eating in schools. Future obesity treatment and prevention studies in clinical, school and community settings should consider assessing academic and cognitive as well as physical outcomes.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Logro
Escolaridade
Exercício
Estilo de Vida
Sobrepeso/terapia
Obesidade Pediátrica/terapia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Criança
Função Executiva
Seres Humanos
Matemática
Sobrepeso/psicologia
Obesidade Pediátrica/psicologia
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
Leitura
Sensibilidade e Especificidade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009728.pub3


  4 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:28453422
[Au] Autor:Delwiche FA
[Ad] Endereço:a Dana Medical Library , University of Vermont , Burlington , Vermont , USA.
[Ti] Título:Health Sciences Library Support of a University Common Reading Program: A Case Study.
[So] Source:Med Ref Serv Q;36(2):150-164, 2017 Apr-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1540-9597
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Common reading programs have become increasingly popular on college and university campuses as a means for increasing student engagement, retention, and success. This article describes the characteristics, goals, and benefits of common reading programs and provides examples from the literature of academic library involvement in them. Finally, an example is provided of how one academic health sciences library participated in its institution's First-Year Summer Reading program.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Bibliotecas Médicas
Leitura
Universidades
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Estudos de Casos Organizacionais
Estudantes
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:H
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/02763869.2017.1293980


  5 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29386445
[Au] Autor:Sugiura A; Eto T; Kinoshita F; Takada H
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Radiological Technology, Gifu University of Medical Science.
[Ti] Título:[Effect of Reading a Book on a Tablet Computer on Cerebral Blood Flow in the Prefrontal Cortex].
[So] Source:Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi;73(1):39-45, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1882-6482
[Cp] País de publicação:Japan
[La] Idioma:jpn
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: By measuring cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex, we aimed to determine how reading a book on a tablet computer affects sleep. METHODS: Seven students (7 men age range, 21-32 years) participated in this study. In a controlled illuminance environment, the subjects read a novel in printed form or on a tablet computer from any distance. As the subjects were reading, the cerebral blood flow in their prefrontal cortex was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. The study protocol was as follows. 1) Subjects mentally counted a sequence of numbers for 30 s as a pretest to standardized thinking and then 2) read the novel for 10 min, using the printed book or tablet computer. In step 2), the use of the book or tablet computer was in a random sequence. Subjects rested between the two tasks. RESULTS: Significantly increased brain activity (increase in regional cerebral blood flow) was observed following reading a novel on a tablet computer compared with that after reading a printed book. Furthermore, the region around Broca's area was more active when reading on a tablet computer than when reading a printed book. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the results of this study and previous studies on physiological characteristics during nonrapid eye movement sleep, we concluded that reading a book on a tablet computer before the onset of sleep leads to the potential inhibition of sound sleep through mechanisms other than the suppression of melatonin secretion.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Circulação Cerebrovascular/fisiologia
Computadores de Mão
Córtex Pré-Frontal/irrigação sanguínea
Leitura
Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/etiologia
Sono/fisiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Livros
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Melatonina/secreção
Espectroscopia de Luz Próxima ao Infravermelho
Fatores de Tempo
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
JL5DK93RCL (Melatonin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180228
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180228
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1265/jjh.73.39


  6 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29364897
[Au] Autor:Jehangir N; Yu CY; Song J; Shariati MA; Binder S; Beyer J; Santini V; Poston K; Liao YJ
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Slower saccadic reading in Parkinson's disease.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191005, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD) is characterized by degeneration of dopaminergic and other neurons, leading to motor and non-motor deficits. Abnormal eye movements in PD, including fixations, saccades, and convergence, are well described. However, saccadic reading, which requires serial and alternating saccades and fixations, is not well studied, despite its obvious impact on the quality of life. In this study, we assessed saccadic reading using variations of the King-Devick (KD) test, a rapid single digit number naming test, as a way to assess the ability to make serial left-to-right ocular motor movements necessary for reading. We recruited 42 treated PD patients and 80 age-matched controls and compared their reading times with a variety of measures, including age, duration of disease, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the National Eye Institute 25-Item Visual Functioning Questionnaire 25 (VFQ-25), and Montreal Cognitive assessment (MoCA) test. The subjects performed 4 trials of reading 120 single digit numbers aloud as fast as possible without making errors. In each trial, they read 3 pages (KD1, KD2, and KD3), and each page contained 40 numbers per page in 8 lines with 5 numbers/line. We found that PD patients read about 20% slower than controls on all tests (KD1, 2, and 3 tests) (p < 0.02), and both groups read irregularly spaced numbers slower than regularly spaced numbers. Having lines between numbers to guide reading (KD1 tests) did not impact reading time in both PD and controls, but increased visual crowding as a result of decreased spacing between numbers (KD3 tests) was associated with significantly slower reading times in both PD and control groups. Our study revealed that saccadic reading is slower in PD, but controls and PD patients are both impacted by visuospatial planning challenges posed by increased visual crowding and irregularity of number spacing. Reading time did not correlate with UPDRS or MoCA scores in PD patients but significantly correlated with age, duration of disease, and VFQ-25 scores. The presence of convergence insufficiency did not significantly correlate with reading time in PD patients, although on average there was slower reading time in those with convergence insufficiency by 8 s (p = 0.2613). We propose that a simple reading task using 120 single-digit numbers can be used as a screening tool in the clinical setting to assess functional ocular motor difficulties in Parkinson's disease that can have a profound impact on quality of life.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doença de Parkinson/fisiopatologia
Leitura
Movimentos Sacádicos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Estudos de Casos e Controles
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191005


  7 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29194151
[Au] Autor:Donnell WM
[Ti] Título:A Correlational Study of a Reading Comprehension Program and Attrition Rates of ESL Nursing Students in Texas.
[So] Source:Nurs Educ Perspect;36(1):16-21, 2015 Jan/Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5026
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:AIM: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between English as a second language (ESL), a reading comprehension program, and attrition rates of nursing students. BACKGROUND: Higher attrition rates of ESL nursing students are an assumption, seemingly based on anecdotal evidence. Data reflecting ESL student attrition should be measured and analyzed so that students can be identified prior to attrition. METHOD: A secondary analysis of a large database of 27 initial licensure programs in Texas was completed. RESULTS: Data analysis identified that ESL students who used a reading comprehension program were almost twice as likely to be off track or out of the program as ESL students who did not use the program. CONCLUSION: Nurse educators need to evaluate student profile characteristics in a comprehensive way when determining risk of attrition.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Compreensão
Bacharelado em Enfermagem/estatística & dados numéricos
Leitura
Evasão Escolar/estatística & dados numéricos
Estudantes de Enfermagem/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Multilinguismo
Texas
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:N
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5480/13-1212


  8 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:27771346
[Au] Autor:Yang Y; Wang J; Bailer C; Cherkassky V; Just MA
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
[Ti] Título:Commonality of neural representations of sentences across languages: Predicting brain activation during Portuguese sentence comprehension using an English-based model of brain function.
[So] Source:Neuroimage;146:658-666, 2017 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9572
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The aim of the study was to test the cross-language generative capability of a model that predicts neural activation patterns evoked by sentence reading, based on a semantic characterization of the sentence. In a previous study on English monolingual speakers (Wang et al., submitted), a computational model performed a mapping from a set of 42 concept-level semantic features (Neurally Plausible Semantic Features, NPSFs) as well as 6 thematic role markers to neural activation patterns (assessed with fMRI), to predict activation levels in a network of brain locations. The model used two types of information gained from the English-based fMRI data to predict the activation for individual sentences in Portuguese. First, it used the mapping weights from NPSFs to voxel activation levels derived from the model for English reading. Second, the brain locations for which the activation levels were predicted were derived from a factor analysis of the brain activation patterns during English reading. These meta-language locations were defined by the clusters of voxels with high loadings on each of the four main dimensions (factors), namely people, places, actions and feelings, underlying the neural representations of the stimulus sentences. This cross-language model succeeded in predicting the brain activation patterns associated with the reading of 60 individual Portuguese sentences that were entirely new to the model, attaining accuracies reliably above chance level. The prediction accuracy was not affected by whether the Portuguese speaker was monolingual or Portuguese-English bilingual. The model's confusion errors indicated an accurate capture of the events or states described in the sentence at a conceptual level. Overall, the cross-language predictive capability of the model demonstrates the neural commonality between speakers of different languages in the representations of everyday events and states, and provides an initial characterization of the common meta-language neural basis.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Encéfalo/fisiologia
Compreensão/fisiologia
Multilinguismo
Leitura
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Mapeamento Encefálico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Semântica
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180219
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180219
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161106
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  9 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:29233291
[Au] Autor:Collins KL; Zweber A; Irwin AN
[Ad] Endereço:Oregon State University College of Pharmacy, 203 Pharmacy Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, United States. Electronic address: karincollins1@gmail.com.
[Ti] Título:Impact of a fictional reading intervention on empathy development in student pharmacists.
[So] Source:Curr Pharm Teach Learn;9(3):498-503, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1877-1300
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: Determine the impact of a short longitudinal literary fiction intervention on empathy development in student pharmacists as measured by the Jefferson Scale of Empathy - Health Profession Students (JSE-HPS) version. METHODS: Twenty-one student pharmacists were randomized to an intervention consisting of reading short excerpts of literary fiction over eight weeks (n=11) or a control group not participating in the intervention (n=10). Both groups completed the JSE-HPS at baseline and completion of the literary intervention. Categorical data were compared using a chi-square or Fisher's exact test, and continuous data were compared using paired or independent t-tests for within and across group comparisons respectively. RESULTS: JSE-HPS scores increased in the intervention group (112.1±10.7 to 116.1±7.4; p=0.201) while they decreased in the control group (118.7±12.6 to 113.0±15.9; p=0.188). Changes across groups were not statistically significant (p=0.061). CONCLUSIONS: Students randomized to an eight-week literature intervention demonstrated a non-statistically significant increase in empathy as measured by the JSE-HPS questionnaire. Similar increases were not observed in students randomized to a control group. As a result, this intervention may represent a novel way to foster empathy in student pharmacists using an intervention requiring few resources. Further research is needed with larger sample sizes, ideally across multiple institutions, in order to validate the effectiveness of this intervention.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação em Farmácia/métodos
Empatia
Leitura
Estudantes de Farmácia/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Literatura Moderna
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Estudos Prospectivos
Distribuição Aleatória
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  10 / 19003 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
[PMID]:27777407
[Au] Autor:Rubinos LH; Brown M; Bahrami L; Christ L; Hurt H
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
[Ti] Título:'The story behind NICU reading programs'.
[So] Source:J Perinatol;36(11):930-931, 2016 11.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5543
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Recém-Nascido de Peso Extremamente Baixo ao Nascer
Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal/organização & administração
Relações Mãe-Filho/psicologia
Leitura
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Feminino
Seres Humanos
Recém-Nascido
Narração
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180214
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180214
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/jp.2016.155



página 1 de 1901 ir para página                         
   


Refinar a pesquisa
  Base de dados : MEDLINE Formulário avançado   

    Pesquisar no campo  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/OPAS/OMS - Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde