Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : M01.526.919 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 187 [refinar]
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  1 / 187 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29206976
[Au] Autor:Brotman S; Drummond J; Silverman M; Sussman T; Orzeck P; Barylak L; Wallach I; Billette V
[Ad] Endereço:School of Work, McGill University, 3506 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
[Ti] Título:Talking about Sexuality and Intimacy with Women Spousal Caregivers: Perspectives of Service Providers.
[So] Source:Health Soc Work;41(4):263-270, 2016 Nov 20.
[Is] ISSN:0360-7283
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:This article reports the findings of an exploratory study examining service provider perceptions and experiences of addressing sexuality and intimacy with women spousal caregivers. The caregiver-provider encounter is examined, and challenges faced by service providers in addressing sexuality are considered. Themes identified include ambivalence and discomfort, personal and institutional barriers, meanings attributed to sexuality and intimacy, and lack of opportunities to discuss experiences. Strategies to overcome silence and invisibility on the part of service providers in the health and social services system are considered.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Cuidadores/psicologia
Papel Profissional
Sexualidade
Assistentes Sociais
Cônjuges/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Entrevistas como Assunto
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Comportamento Sexual
Parceiros Sexuais
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/hsw/hlw040


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[PMID]:29206953
[Au] Autor:Mann CC; Golden JH; Cronk NJ; Gale JK; Hogan T; Washington KT
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Psychiatry, University of Missouri, Columbia. University of Missouri Health Care, Columbia. Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia. University of Missouri Health Care, Columbia. Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Missouri,
[Ti] Título:Social Workers as Behavioral Health Consultants in the Primary Care Clinic.
[So] Source:Health Soc Work;41(3):196-200, 2016 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:0360-7283
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Consultores
Transtornos Mentais/terapia
Atenção Primária à Saúde
Assistentes Sociais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/hsw/hlw027


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[PMID]:29236538
[Au] Autor:Ruth BJ; Wachman MK; Marshall JW; Backman AR; Harrington CB; Schultz NS; Ouimet KJ
[Ad] Endereço:Betty J. Ruth, Madeline K. Wachman, Calla B. Harrington, and Kaitlyn J. Ouimet are with Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA. Jamie W. Marshall is with the Group for Public Health Social Work Initiatives, Boston. Allison R. Backman and Neena S. Schultz are with Boston University Schoo
[Ti] Título:Health in All Social Work Programs: Findings From a US National Analysis.
[So] Source:Am J Public Health;107(S3):S267-S273, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1541-0048
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: To establish a baseline of health content in 4 domains of US social work education-baccalaureate, master's, doctoral, and continuing education programs-and to introduce the Social Work Health Impact Model, illustrating social work's multifaceted health services, from clinical to wide-lens population health approaches. METHODS: We analyzed US social work programs' Web site content to determine amount and types of health content in mission statements, courses, and specializations. Coding criterion determined if content was (1) health or health-related (HHR) and (2) had wide-lens health (WLH) emphasis. A second iteration categorized HHR and WLH courses into health topics. RESULTS: We reviewed 4831 courses. We found broad HHR content in baccalaureate, master's, and continuing education curricula; doctoral programs had limited health content. We identified minimal WLH content across all domains. Topical analysis indicated that more than 50% of courses concentrated on 3 areas: mental and behavioral health, abuse and violence, and substance use and addictions. CONCLUSIONS: As a core health profession, social work must strengthen its health and wide-lens content to better prepare graduates for integrated practice and collaboration in the changing health environment.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Educação Profissional em Saúde Pública/estatística & dados numéricos
Serviço Social/educação
Assistentes Sociais/educação
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Educação Baseada em Competências/organização & administração
Aconselhamento/educação
Currículo
Ocupações em Saúde/educação
Seres Humanos
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304034


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[PMID]:29236537
[Au] Autor:Bachman SS; Wachman M; Manning L; Cohen AM; Seifert RW; Jones DK; Fitzgerald T; Nuzum R; Riley P
[Ad] Endereço:Sara S. Bachman and Madeline Wachman are with the Center for Innovation in Social Work and Health, Boston University, Boston, MA. Sara S. Bachman is also a guest editor for this supplement issue. Leticia Manning is with the US Public Health Service, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Serv
[Ti] Título:Social Work's Role in Medicaid Reform: A Qualitative Study.
[So] Source:Am J Public Health;107(S3):S250-S255, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1541-0048
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: To critically analyze social work's role in Medicaid reform. METHODS: We conducted semistructured interviews with 46 stakeholders from 10 US states that use a range of Medicaid reform approaches. We identified participants using snowball and purposive sampling. We gathered data in 2016 and analyzed them using qualitative methods. RESULTS: Multiple themes emerged: (1) social work participates in Medicaid reform through clinical practice, including care coordination and case management; (2) there is a gap between social work's practice-level and systems-level involvement in Medicaid innovations; (3) factors hindering social work's involvement in systems-level practice include lack of visibility, insufficient clarity on social work's role and impact, and too few resources within professional organizations; and (4) social workers need more training in health transformation payment models and policy. CONCLUSIONS: Social workers have unique skills that are valuable to building health systems that promote population health and reduce health inequities. Although there is considerable opportunity for social work to increase its role in Medicaid reform, there is little social work involvement at the systems level.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Reforma dos Serviços de Saúde/organização & administração
Papel Profissional
Serviço Social/organização & administração
Assistentes Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Medicaid
Pesquisa Qualitativa
Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304002


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[PMID]:29236535
[Au] Autor:Miller DP; Bazzi AR; Allen HL; Martinson ML; Salas-Wright CP; Jantz K; Crevi K; Rosenbloom DL
[Ad] Endereço:Daniel P. Miller, Christopher P. Salas-Wright, and Katherine Crevi are with the School of Social Work, Boston University, Boston, MA. Angela R. Bazzi and David L. Rosenbloom are with the School of Public Health, Boston University. Heidi L. Allen is with the School of Social Work, Columbia University
[Ti] Título:A Social Work Approach to Policy: Implications for Population Health.
[So] Source:Am J Public Health;107(S3):S243-S249, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1541-0048
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The substantial disparities in health and poorer outcomes in the United States relative to peer nations suggest the need to refocus health policy. Through direct contact with the most vulnerable segments of the population, social workers have developed an approach to policy that recognizes the importance of the social environment, the value of social relationships, and the significance of value-driven policymaking. This approach could be used to reorient health, health care, and social policies. Accordingly, social workers can be allies to public health professionals in efforts to eliminate disparities and improve population health.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Política de Saúde
Saúde da População
Serviço Social
Assistentes Sociais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Serviços de Saúde Comunitária
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Política Pública
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304003


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[PMID]:29236534
[Au] Autor:Steketee G; Ross AM; Wachman MK
[Ad] Endereço:Gail Steketee is with the Boston University School of Social Work, Boston, MA. Abigail M. Ross is with the Fordham Graduate School of Social Service, New York, NY. Madeline K. Wachman is with the Center for Innovation in Social Work and Health, Boston University School of Social Work.
[Ti] Título:Health Outcomes and Costs of Social Work Services: A Systematic Review.
[So] Source:Am J Public Health;107(S3):S256-S266, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1541-0048
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Efforts to reduce expensive health service utilization, contain costs, improve health outcomes, and address the social determinants of health require research that demonstrates the economic value of health services in population health across a variety of settings. Social workers are an integral part of the US health care system, yet the specific contributions of social work to health and cost-containment outcomes are unknown. The social work profession's person-in-environment framework and unique skillset, particularly around addressing social determinants of health, hold promise for improving health and cost outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To systematically review international studies of the effect of social work-involved health services on health and economic outcomes. SEARCH METHODS: We searched 4 databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Social Science Citation Index) by using "social work" AND "cost" and "health" for trials published from 1990 to 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: Abstract review was followed by full-text review of all studies meeting inclusion criteria (social work services, physical health, and cost outcomes). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Of the 831 abstracts found, 51 (6.1%) met criteria. Full text review yielded 16 studies involving more than 16 000 participants, including pregnant and pediatric patients, vulnerable low-income adults, and geriatric patients. We examined study quality, health and utilization outcomes, and cost outcomes. MAIN RESULTS: Average study quality was fair. Studies of 7 social work-led services scored higher on quality ratings than 9 studies of social workers as team members. Most studies showed positive effects on health and service utilization; cost-savings were consistent across nearly all studies. CONCLUSIONS: Despite positive overall effects on outcomes, variability in study methods, health problems, and cost analyses render generalizations difficult. Controlled hypothesis-driven trials are needed to examine the health and cost effects of specific services delivered by social workers independently and through interprofessional team-based care. Public Health Implications. The economic and health benefits reported in these studies suggest that the broad health perspective taken by the social work profession for patient, personal, and environmental needs may be particularly valuable for achieving goals of cost containment, prevention, and population health. Novel approaches that move beyond cost savings to articulate the specific value-added of social work are much needed. As health service delivery focuses increasingly on interprofessional training, practice, and integrated care, more research testing the impact of social work prevention and intervention efforts on the health and well-being of vulnerable populations while also measuring societal costs and benefits is essential.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Centros Comunitários de Saúde/economia
Serviço Social/economia
Assistentes Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Comportamento Cooperativo
Análise Custo-Benefício
Promoção da Saúde/economia
Seres Humanos
Relações Interprofissionais
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1712
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304004


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[PMID]:28639262
[Au] Autor:Reeves S; Pelone F; Harrison R; Goldman J; Zwarenstein M
[Ad] Endereço:Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, Kingston University and St George's, University of London, St George's Hospital, Grosvenor Wing, Cranmer Terrace, London, Greater London, UK, SW17 0BE.
[Ti] Título:Interprofessional collaboration to improve professional practice and healthcare outcomes.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;6:CD000072, 2017 06 22.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Poor interprofessional collaboration (IPC) can adversely affect the delivery of health services and patient care. Interventions that address IPC problems have the potential to improve professional practice and healthcare outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of practice-based interventions designed to improve interprofessional collaboration (IPC) amongst health and social care professionals, compared to usual care or to an alternative intervention, on at least one of the following primary outcomes: patient health outcomes, clinical process or efficiency outcomes or secondary outcomes (collaborative behaviour). SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL (2015, issue 11), MEDLINE, CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to November 2015. We handsearched relevant interprofessional journals to November 2015, and reviewed the reference lists of the included studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised trials of practice-based IPC interventions involving health and social care professionals compared to usual care or to an alternative intervention. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of each potentially relevant study. We extracted data from the included studies and assessed the risk of bias of each study. We were unable to perform a meta-analysis of study outcomes, given the small number of included studies and their heterogeneity in clinical settings, interventions and outcomes. Consequently, we summarised the study data and presented the results in a narrative format to report study methods, outcomes, impact and certainty of the evidence. MAIN RESULTS: We included nine studies in total (6540 participants); six cluster-randomised trials and three individual randomised trials (1 study randomised clinicians, 1 randomised patients, and 1 randomised clinicians and patients). All studies were conducted in high-income countries (Australia, Belgium, Sweden, UK and USA) across primary, secondary, tertiary and community care settings and had a follow-up of up to 12 months. Eight studies compared an IPC intervention with usual care and evaluated the effects of different practice-based IPC interventions: externally facilitated interprofessional activities (e.g. team action planning; 4 studies), interprofessional rounds (2 studies), interprofessional meetings (1 study), and interprofessional checklists (1 study). One study compared one type of interprofessional meeting with another type of interprofessional meeting. We assessed four studies to be at high risk of attrition bias and an equal number of studies to be at high risk of detection bias.For studies comparing an IPC intervention with usual care, functional status in stroke patients may be slightly improved by externally facilitated interprofessional activities (1 study, 464 participants, low-certainty evidence). We are uncertain whether patient-assessed quality of care (1 study, 1185 participants), continuity of care (1 study, 464 participants) or collaborative working (4 studies, 1936 participants) are improved by externally facilitated interprofessional activities, as we graded the evidence as very low-certainty for these outcomes. Healthcare professionals' adherence to recommended practices may be slightly improved with externally facilitated interprofessional activities or interprofessional meetings (3 studies, 2576 participants, low certainty evidence). The use of healthcare resources may be slightly improved by externally facilitated interprofessional activities, interprofessional checklists and rounds (4 studies, 1679 participants, low-certainty evidence). None of the included studies reported on patient mortality, morbidity or complication rates.Compared to multidisciplinary audio conferencing, multidisciplinary video conferencing may reduce the average length of treatment and may reduce the number of multidisciplinary conferences needed per patient and the patient length of stay. There was little or no difference between these interventions in the number of communications between health professionals (1 study, 100 participants; low-certainty evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Given that the certainty of evidence from the included studies was judged to be low to very low, there is not sufficient evidence to draw clear conclusions on the effects of IPC interventions. Neverthess, due to the difficulties health professionals encounter when collaborating in clinical practice, it is encouraging that research on the number of interventions to improve IPC has increased since this review was last updated. While this field is developing, further rigorous, mixed-method studies are required. Future studies should focus on longer acclimatisation periods before evaluating newly implemented IPC interventions, and use longer follow-up to generate a more informed understanding of the effects of IPC on clinical practice.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Comportamento Cooperativo
Pessoal de Saúde
Relações Interprofissionais
Prática Profissional
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Ocupações Relacionadas com Saúde
Lista de Checagem
Assistência à Saúde
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros
Farmacêuticos
Médicos
Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
Assistentes Sociais
Telecomunicações
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170823
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170823
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170623
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD000072.pub3


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[PMID]:28619692
[Au] Autor:Stevens J; Lutz R; Osuagwu N; Rotz D; Goesling B
[Ad] Endereço:Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University Department of Pediatrics, Columbus, OH. Electronic address: Jack.Stevens@nationwidechildrens.org.
[Ti] Título:A randomized trial of motivational interviewing and facilitated contraceptive access to prevent rapid repeat pregnancy among adolescent mothers.
[So] Source:Am J Obstet Gynecol;217(4):423.e1-423.e9, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6868
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Most interventions designed to reduce teen pregnancy rates have not focused on pregnant and/or parenting adolescents. Therefore, a large randomized controlled trial was conducted regarding a motivational interviewing program entitled Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy in a low-income sample of adolescent mothers. This program recommended monthly sessions between a participant and a registered nurse over 18 months. This program also featured facilitated birth control access through transportation assistance and a part-time contraceptive clinic. OBJECTIVE: The impact of this program on rapid repeat pregnancies at 18 months after enrollment was evaluated. STUDY DESIGN: Five hundred ninety-eight adolescent females were enrolled from 7 obstetrics-gynecology clinics and 5 postpartum units of a large hospital system in a Midwestern city. Each participant was enrolled at least 28 weeks pregnant or less than 9 weeks postpartum. Each participant was randomized to either the Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy intervention or a usual-care control condition. Intervention participants averaged 4.5 hours of assistance. Participants were contacted by blinded research staff at 6 and 18 months to complete self-report surveys. Differences in outcomes between the intervention and control groups were assessed using ordinary least-squares regression. RESULTS: There was an 18.1% absolute reduction in self-reported repeat pregnancy in the intervention group relative to the control group (20.5% vs 38.6%%; P < .001). There was a 13.7% absolute increase in self-reported long-acting reversible contraception use in the intervention group relative to the control group (40.2% vs 26.5%, P = .002). There was no evidence of harmful effects of the intervention on sexual risk behaviors, such as having sexual intercourse without a condom or greater number of partners. CONCLUSION: The Teen Options to Prevent Pregnancy program represents one of the few evidence-based interventions to reduce rapid repeat teen pregnancy. This relatively brief intervention may be a viable alternative to more time-intensive programs that adolescent mothers may be unable or unwilling to receive.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anticoncepção
Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde
Entrevista Motivacional
Gravidez na Adolescência/prevenção & controle
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Intervalo entre Nascimentos
Comportamento Contraceptivo
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Meio-Oeste dos Estados Unidos
Período Pós-Parto
Gravidez
Assistentes Sociais
Transportes
Sexo sem Proteção/estatística & dados numéricos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171002
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171002
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170617
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28395073
[Au] Autor:Roberts AR; Bowblis JR
[Ad] Endereço:Assistant professor of social work and research fellow, Scripps Gerontology Center, Miami University, McGuffey Hall, E. Spring Street, Oxford, OH, USA.
[Ti] Título:Who Hires Social Workers? Structural and Contextual Determinants of Social Service Staffing in Nursing Homes.
[So] Source:Health Soc Work;42(1):15-23, 2017 02 01.
[Is] ISSN:0360-7283
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Although nurse staffing has been extensively studied within nursing homes (NHs), social services has received less attention. The study describes how social service departments are organized in NHs and examines the structural characteristics of NHs and other macro-focused contextual factors that explain differences in social service staffing patterns using longitudinal national data (Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reports, 2009-2012). NHs have three patterns of staffing for social services, using qualified social workers (QSWs); paraprofessional social service staff; and interprofessional teams, consisting of both QSWs and paraprofessionals. Although most NHs employ a QSW (89 percent), nearly half provide social services through interprofessional teams, and 11 percent rely exclusively on paraprofessionals. Along with state and federal regulations that depend on facility size, other contextual and structural factors within NHs also influence staffing. NHs most likely to hire QSWs are large facilities in urban areas within a health care complex, owned by nonprofit organizations, with more payer mixes associated with more profitable reimbursement. QSWs are least likely to be hired in small facilities in rural areas. The influence of policy in supporting the professionalization of social service staff and the need for QSWs with expertise in gerontology, especially in rural NHs, are discussed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Casas de Saúde/recursos humanos
Admissão e Escalonamento de Pessoal
Assistentes Sociais
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Serviço Social
Inquéritos e Questionários
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170928
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170928
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170411
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/hsw/hlw058


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[PMID]:28276843
[Au] Autor:Forsyth C; Mason B
[Ad] Endereço:a Department of Specialist Services , Hounslow Learning Disability Team, Hounslow & Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust , Hounslow , UK.
[Ti] Título:Shared leadership and group identification in healthcare: The leadership beliefs of clinicians working in interprofessional teams.
[So] Source:J Interprof Care;31(3):291-299, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1469-9567
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Despite the proposed benefits of applying shared and distributed leadership models in healthcare, few studies have explored the leadership beliefs of clinicians and ascertained whether differences exist between professions. The current article aims to address these gaps and, additionally, examine whether clinicians' leadership beliefs are associated with the strength of their professional and team identifications. An online survey was responded to by 229 healthcare workers from community interprofessional teams in mental health settings across the East of England. No differences emerged between professional groups in their leadership beliefs; all professions reported a high level of agreement with shared leadership. A positive association emerged between professional identification and shared leadership in that participants who expressed the strongest level of profession identification also reported the greatest agreement with shared leadership. The same association was demonstrated for team identification and shared leadership. The findings highlight the important link between group identification and leadership beliefs, suggesting that strategies that promote strong professional and team identifications in interprofessional teams are likely to be conducive to clinicians supporting principles of shared leadership. Future research is needed to strengthen this link and examine the leadership practices of healthcare workers.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Relações Interprofissionais
Liderança
Serviços de Saúde Mental/organização & administração
Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente/organização & administração
Identificação Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Comportamento Cooperativo
Estudos Transversais
Inglaterra
Seres Humanos
Terapeutas Ocupacionais/psicologia
Enfermagem Psiquiátrica
Psicologia
Assistentes Sociais/psicologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171023
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171023
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170310
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/13561820.2017.1280005



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