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[PMID]:29364823
[Au] Autor:Keim RG; Gottlieb EL; Vogels DS; Vogels PB
[Ad] Endereço:Editor, Journal of Clinical Orthodontics. editor@jco-online.com.
[Ti] Título:2017 JCO orthodontic practice study: Part 3 practice growth and staff data.
[So] Source:J Clin Orthod;51(12):773-785, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0022-3875
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Recursos Humanos em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos
Ortodontia/organização & administração
Administração da Prática Odontológica/organização & administração
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Recursos Humanos em Odontologia/economia
Seres Humanos
Renda
Ortodontia/economia
Administração da Prática Odontológica/economia
Área de Atuação Profissional
Salários e Benefícios
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1803
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:D
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:28450273
[Au] Autor:Rau HH; Wu YS; Chu CM; Wang FC; Hsu MH; Chang CW; Chen KH; Lee YL; Kao S; Chiu YL; Wen HC; Fuad A; Hsu CY; Chiu HW
[Ad] Endereço:Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.
[Ti] Título:Importance-Performance Analysis of Personal Health Records in Taiwan: A Web-Based Survey.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;19(4):e131, 2017 Apr 27.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] País de publicação:Canada
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Empowering personal health records (PHRs) provides basic human right, awareness, and intention for health promotion. As health care delivery changes toward patient-centered services, PHRs become an indispensable platform for consumers and providers. Recently, the government introduced "My health bank," a Web-based electronic medical records (EMRs) repository for consumers. However, it is not yet a PHR. To date, we do not have a platform that can let patients manage their own PHR. OBJECTIVE: This study creates a vision of a value-added platform for personal health data analysis and manages their health record based on the contents of the "My health bank." This study aimed to examine consumer expectation regarding PHR, using the importance-performance analysis. The purpose of this study was to explore consumer perception regarding this type of a platform: it would try to identify the key success factors and important aspects by using the importance-performance analysis, and give some suggestions for future development based on it. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in Taiwan. Web-based invitation to participate in this study was distributed through Facebook. Respondents were asked to watch an introductory movie regarding PHR before filling in the questionnaire. The questionnaire was focused on 2 aspects, including (1) system functions, and (2) system design and security and privacy. The questionnaire would employ 12 and 7 questions respectively. The questionnaire was designed following 5-points Likert scale ranging from 1 ("disagree strongly") to 5 ("Agree strongly"). Afterwards, the questionnaire data was sorted using IBM SPSS Statistics 21 for descriptive statistics and the importance-performance analysis. RESULTS: This research received 350 valid questionnaires. Most respondents were female (219 of 350 participants, 62.6%), 21-30 years old (238 of 350 participants, 68.0%), with a university degree (228 of 350 participants, 65.1%). They were still students (195 out of 350 participants, 56.6%), with a monthly income of less than NT $30,000 (230 of 350 participants, 65.7%), and living in the North Taiwan (236 of 350 participants, 67.4%), with a good self-identified health status (171 of 350 participants, 48.9%). After performing the importance-performance analysis, we found the following: (1) instead of complex functions, people just want to have a platform that can let them integrate and manage their medical visit, health examination, and life behavior records; (2) they do not care whether their PHR is shared with others; and (3) most of the participants think the system security design is not important, but they also do not feel satisfied with the current security design. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the issues receiving the most user attention were the system functions, circulation, integrity, ease of use, and continuity of the PHRs, data security, and privacy protection.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/organização & administração
Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/normas
Internet
Inquéritos e Questionários
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Segurança Computacional
Estudos Transversais
Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde/utilização
Feminino
Nível de Saúde
Seres Humanos
Renda
Masculino
Satisfação do Paciente
Privacidade
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
Taiwan
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1711
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180308
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180308
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.7065


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[PMID]:28464812
[Au] Autor:Murgatroyd D; Harris IA; Chen JS; Adie S; Mittal R; Cameron ID
[Ad] Endereço:John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, The University of Sydney, Kolling Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. dmur0062@uni.sydney.edu.au.
[Ti] Título:Predictors of seeking financial compensation following motor vehicle trauma: inception cohort with moderate to severe musculoskeletal injuries.
[So] Source:BMC Musculoskelet Disord;18(1):177, 2017 05 02.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2474
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Compensation related factors have been repeatedly associated with poor recovery following orthopaedic trauma. There is limited research into the factors associated with seeking financial compensation. Further understanding of these factors could facilitate injury recovery by purposeful compensation scheme design. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of seeking financial compensation, namely making a claim and seeking legal representation, following motor vehicle related orthopaedic trauma. The study was conducted in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, in motor vehicle crash and workers' compensation schemes. METHODS: Participants were patients admitted with upper or lower extremity factures following a motor vehicle crash to two trauma hospitals. Data were collected at baseline within two weeks of injury. Participants were followed up at six months. Analysis involved: descriptive statistics for baseline characteristics; comparison of compensable and non-compensable participants with Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and chi-squared tests; and logistic regression for predictor models. RESULTS: The cohort consisted of 452 participants with a mean age 40 years; 75% male; 74% working pre-injury; 30% in excellent pre-injury health; 56% sustained serious injuries with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) 9-15; 61% had a low-middle range household income; and 35% self-reported at fault in the crash. There was no significant difference in pre-injury/baseline health between compensable and non-compensable participants. Follow up data was available for 301 (67%) participants. The significant predictor of claiming compensation in the adjusted analysis was higher body mass index (BMI) (overweight Odds Ratio [OR] 3.05, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.63-5.68; obese OR 1.63, 95% CI 0.83-3.20). Participants less likely to claim were: involved in a motorcycle crash (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.28-0.82); socioeconomically less disadvantaged (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.17-0.82) or least disadvantaged (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.17-0.90); at risk for short term harm (injury) due to alcohol consumption (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32-0.97); and with fair-poor pre-injury health (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.94). The predictors for seeking legal representation were speaking a language other than English at home (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.2-6.52) and lower household income (OR 3.63, 95% CI 1.22-10.72). Participants less likely to seek legal representation were least socioeconomically disadvantaged (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04-0.50). CONCLUSIONS: Seeking financial compensation was associated with a higher pre-injury BMI rather than injury-related factors. Seeking legal representation was solely related to socio-economic factors.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Acidentes de Trânsito/economia
Compensação e Reparação
Sistema Musculoesquelético/lesões
Ferimentos e Lesões/economia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Acidentes de Trânsito/legislação & jurisprudência
Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Automóveis
Índice de Massa Corporal
Compensação e Reparação/legislação & jurisprudência
Grupos Étnicos
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Renda
Serviços Jurídicos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Motocicletas
New South Wales
Recuperação de Função Fisiológica
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Populações Vulneráveis
Ferimentos e Lesões/etiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180306
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180306
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12891-017-1535-z


  4 / 25067 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28747180
[Au] Autor:Hakeberg M; Wide Boman U
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Behavioral and Community Dentistry, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 450, 40530, Gothenburg, SE, Sweden. hakeberg@gu.se.
[Ti] Título:Self-reported oral and general health in relation to socioeconomic position.
[So] Source:BMC Public Health;18(1):63, 2017 07 26.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2458
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: During the past two decades, several scientific publications from different countries have shown how oral health in the population varies with social determinants. The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between self-reported oral and general health in relation to different measures of socioeconomic position. METHODS: Data were collected from a randomly selected sample of the adult population in Sweden (n = 3500, mean age 53.4 years, 53.1% women). The response rate was 49.7%. Subjects were interviewed by telephone, using a questionnaire including items on self-reported oral and general health, socioeconomic position and lifestyle. RESULTS: A significant gradient was found for both oral and general health: the lower the socioeconomic position, the poorer the health. Socioeconomic position and, above all, economic measures were strongly associated with general health (OR 3.95) and with oral health (OR 1.76) if having an income below SEK 200,000 per year. Similar results were found in multivariate analyses controlling for age, gender and lifestyle variables. CONCLUSIONS: For adults, there are clear socioeconomic gradients in self-reported oral and general health, irrespective of different socioeconomic measures. Action is needed to ensure greater equity of oral and general health.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Nível de Saúde
Renda/estatística & dados numéricos
Saúde Bucal/estatística & dados numéricos
Autorrelato
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Inquéritos e Questionários
Suécia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180304
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180304
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170728
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12889-017-4609-9


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[PMID]:28465458
[Au] Autor:Pennlert J; Asplund K; Glader EL; Norrving B; Eriksson M
[Ad] Endereço:From the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine, (J.P., K.A., E.-L.G.), and Department of Statistics, Umeå School of Business and Economics (M.E.), Umeå University, Sweden; and Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Neurology, Lund University, Sweden (B.N.). johanna.pennlert
[Ti] Título:Socioeconomic Status and the Risk of Stroke Recurrence: Persisting Gaps Observed in a Nationwide Swedish Study 2001 to 2012.
[So] Source:Stroke;48(6):1518-1523, 2017 06.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4628
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This nationwide observational study aimed to investigate how socioeconomic status is associated with risk of stroke recurrence and how possible associations change over time. METHODS: This study included 168 295 patients, previously independent in activities of daily living, with a first-ever stroke in the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) 2001 to 2012. Riksstroke was linked with Statistics Sweden as to add individual information on education and income. Subdistribution hazard regression was used to analyze time from 28 days after first stroke to stroke recurrence, accounting for the competing risk of other causes of death. RESULTS: Median time of follow-up was 3.0 years. During follow-up, 23 560 patients had a first recurrent stroke, and 53 867 died from other causes. The estimated cumulative incidence of stroke recurrence was 5.3% at 1 year, and 14.3% at 5 years. Corresponding incidence for other deaths were 10.3% and 30.2%. Higher education and income were associated with a reduced risk of stroke recurrence. After adjusting for confounding variables, university versus primary school education returned a hazard ratio of 0.902; 95% confidence interval, 0.864 to 0.942, and the highest versus the lowest income tertile a hazard ratio of 0.955; 95% confidence interval, 0.922 to 0.989. The risk of stroke recurrence decreased during the study period, but the inverse effect of socioeconomic status on risk of recurrence did not change significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a declining risk of stroke recurrence over time, the differences in recurrence risk between different socioeconomic groups remained at a similar level in Sweden during 2001 to 2012.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Escolaridade
Renda/estatística & dados numéricos
Sistema de Registros/estatística & dados numéricos
Classe Social
Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Feminino
Seguimentos
Seres Humanos
Incidência
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Recidiva
Risco
Suécia/epidemiologia
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.116.015643


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[PMID]:29389095
[Au] Autor:Lee D; Sikula A; Lee T; Dodds AA; Na Y
[Ti] Título:Effect of Physician IT Use on Practice Performance.
[So] Source:J Health Hum Serv Adm;39(3):357-82, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1079-3739
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The role of information technology (IT) remains important within the medical community. However, little is known about the extent to which practicing physicians improve practice performance by having and utilizing IT at the national level. The present study, analyzing a national physician survey (n = 4,720), seeks to explore associations of IT availability and utilization with practice performance at the national level. The multivariate regression analysis results suggest that patient information IT functionality upholds physician advantages in annual income but prescription drug IT functionality was reversely linked to annual income. We also found a negative association of patient information IT functionality with patient visit volume. Our study results revealed mixed findings. Not all IT functionalities would offer benefits to practicing physicians. Our data suggest that patient information IT functionality can moderate cost concerns related to IT investment among providers.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Renda/estatística & dados numéricos
Informática Médica
Padrões de Prática Médica
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Eficiência
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Melhoria de Qualidade
Inquéritos e Questionários
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:H
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180202
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  7 / 25067 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29388757
[Au] Autor:Jalal S; Khan NU; Younis MZ
[Ti] Título:Effect of GNI on Infant Mortality Rate in Low Income, Lower Middle Income, Upper Middle Income and High Income Countries.
[So] Source:J Health Hum Serv Adm;39(2):159-85, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1079-3739
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Global disparities in health form a complex issue adversely affecting much of the world's population. What has been found is that national income and other general socio-economic factors are strong determinants of population health (Houweling, 2005 & Schell, 2007). In countries where resources are less, people are much less healthy than people living in rich countries. In wealthier countries that have made immense progress in health indicators, the resulting change in age structure and morbidity and mortality patterns portends even greater financial demands on the health sector. This study noted the trends in several health indicators versus economic indicators and related it to low income, lower middle income, upper middle income and high income countries. We noted that there is improvement in all health indicators along with an increasing GNI per Capita and GDP. In low income regions though, the rate of improvement is slower as opposed to high income countries. However, there is progress, which is leading to an increase in aging population.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Saúde Global
Produto Interno Bruto
Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde
Renda/estatística & dados numéricos
Mortalidade Infantil/tendências
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Países Desenvolvidos/economia
Países em Desenvolvimento/economia
Indicadores Básicos de Saúde
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Recém-Nascido
Expectativa de Vida
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:H
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180202
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29206952
[Au] Autor:MacDougall H
[Ad] Endereço:3144 Chowen Avenue South #211, Minneapolis, MN 55416.
[Ti] Título:Dental Disparities among Low-Income American Adults: A Social Work Perspective.
[So] Source:Health Soc Work;41(3):208-210, 2016 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:0360-7283
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Assistência Odontológica
Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde
Renda/estatística & dados numéricos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Pobreza
Serviço Social
Estados Unidos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180227
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180227
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/hsw/hlw026


  9 / 25067 MEDLINE  
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Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira
Texto completo
[PMID]:29364943
[Au] Autor:Singh A; Harford J; Antunes JLF; Peres MA
[Ad] Endereço:Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health (ARCPOH), Adelaide Dental School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Area-level income inequality and oral health among Australian adults-A population-based multilevel study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191438, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: A lack of evidence exists on the association between area-level income inequality and oral health within Australia. This study examined associations between area-level income inequality and oral health outcomes (inadequate dentition (<21 teeth) and poor self-rated oral health) among Australian adults. Variations in the association between area-level income inequality and oral health outcomes according to area-level mean income were also assessed. Finally, household-income gradients in oral health outcomes according to area-level income inequality were compared. METHODS: For the analyses, data on Australian dentate adults (n = 5,165 nested in 435 Local Government Areas (LGAs)) was obtained from the National Dental Telephone Interview Survey-2013. Multilevel multivariable logistic regression models with random intercept and fixed slopes were fitted to test associations between area-level income inequality and oral health outcomes, examine variations in associations according to area-level mean income, and examine variations in household-income gradients in outcomes according to area-level income inequality. Covariates included age, sex, LGA-level mean weekly household income, geographic remoteness and household income. RESULTS: LGA-level income inequality was not associated with poor self-rated oral health and inversely associated with inadequate dentition (OR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.87) after adjusting for covariates. Inverse association between income inequality and inadequate dentition at the individual level was limited to LGAs within the highest tertile of mean weekly household income. Household income gradients in both outcomes showed poorer oral health at lower levels of household income. The household income gradients for inadequate dentition varied according to the LGA-level income inequality. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that income inequality at the LGA-level in Australia is not positively associated with poorer oral health outcomes. Inverse association between income inequality and inadequate dentition is likely due to the contextual differences between Australia and other high-income countries.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Saúde Bucal
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Idoso
Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
Austrália
Inquéritos de Saúde Bucal
Dentição Permanente
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Renda
Modelos Logísticos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Autorrelato
Fatores Socioeconômicos
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191438


  10 / 25067 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:29357383
[Au] Autor:Ultee KHJ; Tjeertes EKM; Bastos Gonçalves F; Rouwet EV; Hoofwijk AGM; Stolker RJ; Verhagen HJM; Hoeks SE
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Título:The relation between household income and surgical outcome in the Dutch setting of equal access to and provision of healthcare.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191464, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: The impact of socioeconomic disparities on surgical outcome in the absence of healthcare inequality remains unclear. Therefore, we set out to determine the association between socioeconomic status (SES), reflected by household income, and overall survival after surgery in the Dutch setting of equal access and provision of care. Additionally, we aim to assess whether SES is associated with cause-specific survival and major 30-day complications. METHODS: Patients undergoing surgery between March 2005 and December 2006 in a general teaching hospital in the Netherlands were prospectively included. Adjusted logistic and cox regression analyses were used to assess the independent association of SES-quantified by gross household income-with major 30-day complications and long-term postoperative survival. RESULTS: A total of 3929 patients were included, with a median follow-up of 6.3 years. Low household income was associated with worse survival in continuous analysis (HR: 1.05 per 10.000 euro decrease in income, 95% CI: 1.01-1.10) and in income quartile analysis (HR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.08-2.31, first [i.e. lowest] quartile relative to the fourth quartile). Similarly, low income patients were at higher risk of cardiovascular death (HR: 1.26 per 10.000 decrease in income, 95% CI: 1.07-1.48, first income quartile: HR: 3.10, 95% CI: 1.04-9.22). Household income was not independently associated with cancer-related mortality and major 30-day complications. CONCLUSIONS: Low SES, quantified by gross household income, is associated with increased overall and cardiovascular mortality risks among surgical patients. Considering the equality of care provided by this study setting, the associated survival hazards can be attributed to patient and provider factors, rather than disparities in healthcare. Increased physician awareness of SES as a risk factor in preoperative decision-making and focus on improving established SES-related risk factors may improve surgical outcome of low SES patients.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/economia
Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos
Renda
Classe Social
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Feminino
Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Países Baixos
Análise de Sobrevida
Resultado do Tratamento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180123
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191464



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