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[PMID]:28603010
[Au] Autor:Kovic B; Zoratti MJ; Michalopoulos S; Silvestre C; Thorlund K; Thabane L
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Health Sciences Centre Room 2C1, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada. Electronic address: kovicb@mcmaster.ca.
[Ti] Título:Deficiencies in addressing effect modification in network meta-analyses: a meta-epidemiological survey.
[So] Source:J Clin Epidemiol;88:47-56, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5921
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the current state of reporting and handling of effect modification in network meta-analyses (NMAs) and perform exploratory analyses to identify variables that are potentially associated with incomplete reporting of effect modifiers in NMAs. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We conducted a meta-epidemiological survey using a systematic review of NMAs published in 2013 and identified through MEDLINE and Embase databases. RESULTS: The review identified 77 NMAs. The most common type of effect modifiers identified and explored were patient characteristics (50.7% or 39/77), and the most common adjustment method used was sensitivity analysis (51.7% or 30/58). Over 45% (35/77) of studies did not describe a plan, nearly 40% (30/77) did not report the results of analyses, and approximately 47% (36/77) of studies had incomplete reporting. Exploratory univariate regression analyses yielded a statistically significant association for the variables of journal impact factor, ratio of randomized controlled trials to number of comparisons, and total number of randomized controlled trials. CONCLUSION: Current reporting practices are largely deficient, given that almost half of identified published NMAs do not explore or report effect modification. Journal impact factor and amount of available information in a network were associated with completeness of reporting.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Estudos Epidemiológicos
Metanálise em Rede
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
Fator de Impacto de Revistas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170913
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170913
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170613
[St] Status:MEDLINE


  2 / 1189 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28472328
[Au] Autor:Steen J; Loeys T; Moerkerke B; Vansteelandt S
[Ti] Título:Flexible Mediation Analysis With Multiple Mediators.
[So] Source:Am J Epidemiol;186(2):184-193, 2017 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1476-6256
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:The advent of counterfactual-based mediation analysis has triggered enormous progress on how, and under what assumptions, one may disentangle path-specific effects upon combining arbitrary (possibly nonlinear) models for mediator and outcome. However, current developments have largely focused on single mediators because required identification assumptions prohibit simple extensions to settings with multiple mediators that may depend on one another. In this article, we propose a procedure for obtaining fine-grained decompositions that may still be recovered from observed data in such complex settings. We first show that existing analytical approaches target specific instances of a more general set of decompositions and may therefore fail to provide a comprehensive assessment of the processes that underpin cause-effect relationships between exposure and outcome. We then outline conditions for obtaining the remaining set of decompositions. Because the number of targeted decompositions increases rapidly with the number of mediators, we introduce natural effects models along with estimation methods that allow for flexible and parsimonious modeling. Our procedure can easily be implemented using off-the-shelf software and is illustrated using a reanalysis of the World Health Organization's Large Analysis and Review of European Housing and Health Status (WHO-LARES) study on the effect of mold exposure on mental health (2002-2003).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Causalidade
Interpretação Estatística de Dados
Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Projetos de Pesquisa Epidemiológica
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Viés
Fatores de Confusão (Epidemiologia)
Seres Humanos
Modelos Estatísticos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171116
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171116
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/aje/kwx051


  3 / 1189 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28218773
[Au] Autor:Harris BS; Bishop KC; Kemeny HR; Walker JS; Rhee E; Kuller JA
[Ad] Endereço:Resident Physician, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
[Ti] Título:Risk Factors for Birth Defects.
[So] Source:Obstet Gynecol Surv;72(2):123-135, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1533-9866
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Importance: Major congenital abnormalities, or birth defects, carry significant medical, surgical, cosmetic, or lifestyle consequences. Such abnormalities may be syndromic, involving multiple organ systems, or can be isolated. Overall, 2% to 4% of live births involve congenital abnormalities. Risk factors for birth defects are categorized as modifiable and nonmodifiable. Modifiable risk factors require thorough patient education/counseling. The strongest risk factors, such as age, family history, and a previously affected child, are usually nonmodifiable. Objective: This review focuses on risk factors for birth defects including alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, smoking, obesity, pregestational diabetes, maternal phenylketonuria, multiple gestation, advanced maternal age, advanced paternal age, family history/consanguinity, folic acid deficiency, medication exposure, and radiation exposure. Evidence Acquisition: Literature review via PubMed. Results: There is a strong link between alcohol use, folic acid deficiency, obesity, uncontrolled maternal diabetes mellitus, uncontrolled maternal phenylketonuria, and monozygotic twins and an increased risk of congenital anomalies. Advanced maternal age confers an increased risk of aneuploidy, as well as nonchromosomal abnormalities. Some medications, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, retinoic acid, folic acid antagonists, and certain anticonvulsants, are associated with various birth defects. However, there are few proven links between illicit drug use, smoking, advanced paternal age, radiation exposure, and statins with specific birth defects. Conclusions and Relevance: Birth defects are associated with multiple modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors. Obstetrics providers should work with patients to minimize their risk of birth defects if modifiable risk factors are present and to appropriately counsel patients when nonmodifiable risk factors are present.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anormalidades Congênitas
Aconselhamento/métodos
Comportamento de Redução do Risco
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia
Anormalidades Congênitas/prevenção & controle
Anormalidades Congênitas/psicologia
Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Gravidez
Medição de Risco
Fatores de Risco
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Mês de entrada:1703
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170302
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170302
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/OGX.0000000000000405


  4 / 1189 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28163281
[Au] Autor:Pena Gralle APB; Barbosa Moreno A; Lopes Juvanhol L; Mendes da Fonseca MJ; Prates Melo EC; Antunes Nunes MA; Toivanen S; Griep RH
[Ad] Endereço:Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Sergio Arouca National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation.
[Ti] Título:Job strain and binge eating among Brazilian workers participating in the ELSA-Brasil study: does BMI matter?
[So] Source:J Occup Health;59(3):247-255, 2017 May 25.
[Is] ISSN:1348-9585
[Cp] País de publicação:Japan
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between job strain and binge eating as well as the effect-modifying influence of body mass index (BMI) on this association. METHODS: A total of 11,951 active civil servants from the multicenter Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) was included in this cross-sectional analysis. Job strain was assessed using the Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire. Binge eating was defined as eating a large amount of food with a sense of lack of control over what and how much is eaten in less than 2 hours at least twice a week. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the association between binge eating and job strain as well as its interaction with BMI. RESULTS: After adjustment, and using low-strain job as the reference category, binge eating was associated with high-strain job (high demand/low control: odds ratio [OR]=1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26-1.98), active job (high demand/high control: OR=1.35, 95% CI 1.07-1.70), and passive job (low demand/low control: OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.01-1.53). Psychological job demands were positively associated with binge eating (OR=1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07), while greater job control and social support at work were each inversely associated with binge eating (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.92-0.97 and OR=0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98, respectively). BMI modified the association between job strain and binge eating: Heavier psychological job demands were associated with higher odds of binge eating among obese participants, while a stronger inverse association between job control and binge eating was seen among slimmer participants. CONCLUSIONS: Job strain increases the odds of binge eating and this association is modified by BMI.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Bulimia/epidemiologia
Bulimia/psicologia
Doenças Profissionais/epidemiologia
Doenças Profissionais/psicologia
Estresse Psicológico/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Índice de Massa Corporal
Brasil/epidemiologia
Estudos Transversais
Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Modelos Logísticos
Estudos Longitudinais
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Fatores de Risco
Apoio Social
Inquéritos e Questionários
Local de Trabalho
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1710
[Cu] Atualização por classe:171010
[Lr] Data última revisão:
171010
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1539/joh.16-0157-OA


  5 / 1189 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28158877
[Au] Autor:Mamudu HM; Paul TK; Wang L; Veeranki SP; Panchal HB; Alamian A; Budoff M
[Ad] Endereço:From the Department of Health Services Management and Policy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City.
[Ti] Título:Association Between Multiple Modifiable Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease and Hypertension among Asymptomatic Patients in Central Appalachia.
[So] Source:South Med J;110(2):90-96, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1541-8243
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: The central Appalachian region of the United States is disproportionately burdened with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and associated risk factors; however, research to inform clinical practice and policies and programs is sparse. This study aimed to examine the association between multiple modifiable risk factors for CVD and hypertension in asymptomatic patients in central Appalachia. METHODS: Between January 2011 and December 2012, 1629 asymptomatic individuals from central Appalachia participated in screening for subclinical atherosclerosis. Participants were asked to report their hypertension status (yes/no). In addition, data on two nonmodifiable risk factors (sex, age) and five modifiable risk factors (obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and sedentary lifestyle) were collected. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess association between hypertension and risk factors. RESULTS: Of the 1629 participants, approximately half (49.8%) had hypertension. Among people with hypertension, 31.4% were obese and 62.3% had hypercholesterolemia. After adjusting for sex and age, obesity and diabetes mellitus were associated with a more than twofold increased odds of having hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, confidence interval [CI] 1.57-2.60 and OR 2.30, CI 1.66-3.18, respectively). Hypercholesterolemia and sedentary lifestyle were associated with higher odds for hypertension (OR 1.26, CI 1.02-1.56 and OR 1.38, CI 1.12-1.70, respectively), compared with referent groups. Having two, three, and four to five modifiable risk factors was associated with increased odds of having hypertension by about twofold (OR 1.72, CI 1.21-2.44), 2.5-fold (OR 2.55, CI 1.74-3.74), and sixfold (OR 5.96, CI 3.42-10.41), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that the odds of having hypertension increases with a higher number of modifiable risk factors for CVD. As such, implementing an integrated CVD program for treating and controlling modifiable risk factors for hypertension would likely decrease the future risk of CVD.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Doenças Cardiovasculares
Hipertensão/epidemiologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Região dos Apalaches/epidemiologia
Doenças Assintomáticas/epidemiologia
Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia
Doenças Cardiovasculares/prevenção & controle
Doenças Cardiovasculares/psicologia
Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia
Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Hipercolesterolemia/epidemiologia
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Obesidade/epidemiologia
Prevalência
Fatores de Risco
Estilo de Vida Sedentário
Fumar/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170605
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170605
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:AIM; IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170204
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000602


  6 / 1189 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28122612
[Au] Autor:Quick A; Böhnke JR; Wright J; Pickett KE
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, UK. annie.quick@neweconomics.org.
[Ti] Título:Does involvement in a cohort study improve health and affect health inequalities? A natural experiment.
[So] Source:BMC Health Serv Res;17(1):79, 2017 Jan 25.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6963
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that the process of taking part in health research can improve participants' health, independent of any intended intervention. However, no research has yet explored whether these effects differ across socioeconomic groups. If the effect of mere participation in health research also has a social gradient this could increase health inequalities and bias research results. This study used the Born in Bradford family cohort (BIB) to explore whether simply taking part in BIB had improved participants' health and, if so, whether this effect was mediated by socioeconomic status. METHODS: Survey data on self-reported health behaviours were collected between 2007 and 2010 as part of BIB. These were augmented by clinical data on birth weight. Pregnant women on their second pregnancy, joining BIB for the first time formed the control group. Their health was compared to women on their second pregnancy who had both pregnancies within the study, who formed the exposed group. In order to limit the inherent bias in a non-randomised study, propensity score analysis was used, matching on age, ethnicity, education and date of questionnaire. The results were then compared according to mothers' education. RESULTS: Of six outcomes tested, only alcohol consumption showed a statistically significant reduction with exposure to BIB (OR: 0.35, 95% CIs 0.13, 0.92). Although effect estimates were larger for women with higher education compared to lower education, these effects were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Despite one significant finding, these results overall are insufficient to conclude that simply taking part in BIB affected participants' health. We recommend that socioeconomic status is considered in future studies testing effects of research participation, and that randomised studies with larger sample sizes are conducted.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Estudos de Coortes
Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde
Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde
Gravidez
Classe Social
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Pontuação de Propensão
Inquéritos e Questionários
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1709
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170911
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170911
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170127
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12913-017-2016-7


  7 / 1189 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28058794
[Au] Autor:Borenstein M; Higgins JP; Hedges LV; Rothstein HR
[Ad] Endereço:BioStat, Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA.
[Ti] Título:Basics of meta-analysis: I is not an absolute measure of heterogeneity.
[So] Source:Res Synth Methods;8(1):5-18, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1759-2887
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:When we speak about heterogeneity in a meta-analysis, our intent is usually to understand the substantive implications of the heterogeneity. If an intervention yields a mean effect size of 50 points, we want to know if the effect size in different populations varies from 40 to 60, or from 10 to 90, because this speaks to the potential utility of the intervention. While there is a common belief that the I statistic provides this information, it actually does not. In this example, if we are told that I is 50%, we have no way of knowing if the effects range from 40 to 60, or from 10 to 90, or across some other range. Rather, if we want to communicate the predicted range of effects, then we should simply report this range. This gives readers the information they think is being captured by I and does so in a way that is concise and unambiguous. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Metanálise como Assunto
Projetos de Pesquisa
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/tratamento farmacológico
Atitude
Cognição/efeitos dos fármacos
Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Disfunção Erétil/tratamento farmacológico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Metilfenidato/uso terapêutico
Modelos Estatísticos
Mães
Prevalência
Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
Estatística como Assunto
Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/terapia
Resultado do Tratamento
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
207ZZ9QZ49 (Methylphenidate)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170823
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170823
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170107
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/jrsm.1230


  8 / 1189 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:28046105
[Au] Autor:Zhang Z; Poucke SV
[Ad] Endereço:Department of emergency medicine, Sir Run-Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, P.R. China.
[Ti] Título:Citations for Randomized Controlled Trials in Sepsis Literature: The Halo Effect Caused by Journal Impact Factor.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(1):e0169398, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Citations for randomized controlled trials (RCT) are important for the dissemination of study results. However, predictors of citations for RCTs have not been investigated. The study aimed to investigate the predictors of citations for RCTs in sepsis literature. RCTs that investigated the efficacy of treatment strategies on clinical outcomes in sepsis patients were included, and publication dates were restricted to the period from 2000 to 2016. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane handbook for systematic reviews and interventions. A multivariable linear regression model was built to investigate the independent variables associated with total citations. In total, 160 RCTs met our inclusion criteria and were included for analysis. The median of total citations was 28.5 (IQR: 6-76). The journal impact factor (IF) for articles was 6.312 (IQR: 3.143-7.214). The dependent variable was transformed by the square root to improve normality and meet the assumption of homoscedasticity. The journal IF (coefficient: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.25) was independently associated with total citations. Large samples were associated with more total citations (coefficient: 0.0026; 95% CI: 0.0013, 0.0039). The study demonstrated that the journal IF was a major determinant of the RCT's total citation number.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Bibliometria
Fator de Impacto de Revistas
Publicações Periódicas como Assunto
Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
Sepse/terapia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Algoritmos
Coleta de Dados
Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Seres Humanos
Análise Multivariada
Literatura de Revisão como Assunto
Sensibilidade e Especificidade
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1708
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170821
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170821
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170104
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0169398


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[PMID]:27815430
[Au] Autor:Fujishiro K; Lividoti Hibert E; Schernhammer E; Rich-Edwards JW
[Ad] Endereço:Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluation, and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
[Ti] Título:Shift work, job strain and changes in the body mass index among women: a prospective study.
[So] Source:Occup Environ Med;74(6):410-416, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1470-7926
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:OBJECTIVES: The effects of job strain and shift work on weight gain have not been studied jointly. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on shift work and weight gain have reported different results. This study examines potential effect modification by job strain on the link between shift work and weight gain, and concurrent and delayed effects of shift work on weight gain. METHODS: Data came from 52 622 women who participated in the Nurses' Health Study II, a prospective cohort study. Using linear regression, we modelled change in body mass index (BMI) over 4 years as a function of change in job strain, cumulative exposure to rotating night shift previously and during the 4 years (ie, previous and concurrent exposures) and the interaction between job strain and concurrent shift work exposure. Age, race/ethnicity, pregnancy history, baseline BMI, job types and health behaviours at baseline were controlled for. RESULTS: Job strain and rotating shift work, concurrent and previous, all had independent associations with BMI change during the 4-year period. There was no evidence for effect modification by job strain. Concurrent and previous exposures to rotating night shift had different associations with BMI change: an inverted U-shape for concurrent exposure (ranging from 0.01 to 0.14 kg/m increase), a dose-response for previous exposure (-0.02 to 0.09 kg/m ). CONCLUSIONS: Job strain and rotating night shift work have independent contributions to weight gain. Reducing job strain and supporting night shift workers are both important intervention goals.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros/psicologia
Estresse Psicológico/complicações
Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia
Ganho de Peso
Tolerância ao Trabalho Programado/fisiologia
Tolerância ao Trabalho Programado/psicologia
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Índice de Massa Corporal
Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Modelos Lineares
Meia-Idade
Sobrepeso/epidemiologia
Sobrepeso/psicologia
Estudos Prospectivos
Inquéritos e Questionários
Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1706
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170615
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170615
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161106
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/oemed-2016-103747


  10 / 1189 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]:27800581
[Au] Autor:Iacobucci D; Schneider MJ; Popovich DL; Bakamitsos GA
[Ad] Endereço:Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. dawn.iacobucci@owen.vanderbilt.edu.
[Ti] Título:Mean centering, multicollinearity, and moderators in multiple regression: The reconciliation redux.
[So] Source:Behav Res Methods;49(1):403-404, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1554-3528
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:In this article, we attempt to clarify our statements regarding the effects of mean centering. In a multiple regression with predictors A, B, and A × B (where A × B serves as an interaction term), mean centering A and B prior to computing the product term can clarify the regression coefficients (which is good) and the overall model fit R will remain undisturbed (which is also good).
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Análise Multivariada
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Modificador do Efeito Epidemiológico
Seres Humanos
Modelos Teóricos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1707
[Cu] Atualização por classe:170703
[Lr] Data última revisão:
170703
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:161102
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3758/s13428-016-0827-9



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