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[PMID]:28467301
[Au] Autor:Wolff JN; Gemmell NJ; Tompkins DM; Dowling DK
[Ad] Endereço:School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Introduction of a male-harming mitochondrial haplotype via 'Trojan Females' achieves population suppression in fruit flies.
[So] Source:Elife;6, 2017 05 03.
[Is] ISSN:2050-084X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Pests are a global threat to biodiversity, ecosystem function, and human health. Pest control approaches are thus numerous, but their implementation costly, damaging to non-target species, and ineffective at low population densities. The Trojan Female Technique (TFT) is a prospective self-perpetuating control technique that is species-specific and predicted to be effective at low densities. The goal of the TFT is to harness naturally occurring mutations in the mitochondrial genome that impair male fertility while having no effect on females. Here, we provide proof-of-concept for the TFT, by showing that introduction of a male fertility-impairing mtDNA haplotype into replicated populations of causes numerical population suppression, with the magnitude of effect positively correlated with its frequency at trial inception. Further development of the TFT could lead to establishing a control strategy that overcomes limitations of conventional approaches, with broad applicability to invertebrate and vertebrate species, to control environmental and economic pests.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: DNA Mitocondrial/genética
Haplótipos
Infertilidade Masculina
Controle de Mosquitos/métodos
Mutação
Estudo de Prova de Conceito
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Drosophila melanogaster
Feminino
Masculino
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (DNA, Mitochondrial)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180305
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180305
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29352307
[Au] Autor:Britch SC; Linthicum KJ; Aldridge RL; Breidenbaugh MS; Latham MD; Connelly PH; Rush MJE; Remmers JL; Kerce JD; Silcox CA; US Navy Entomology Center of Excellence Team
[Ad] Endereço:United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical, Agricultural, & Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.
[Ti] Título:Aerial ULV control of Aedes aegypti with naled (Dibrom) inside simulated rural village and urban cryptic habitats.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191555, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:We conducted aerial fixed wing ultra low volume (ULV) spray trials with naled to investigate penetration of exposed and simulated cryptic habitat within opened buildings, partially sealed buildings, and outdoor locations targeting sentinel adult Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in north central Florida. Mortality was observed in open and closed buildings and outdoors, even in mosquitoes placed in cryptic habitats. Observations on the impact of building type, mosquito exposure method such as placement in cryptic habitat, and spray nozzle size on mosquito mortality are described and analyzed.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aedes
Inseticidas
Controle de Mosquitos/métodos
Naled
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Aedes/virologia
Animais
Simulação por Computador
Ecossistema
Florida
Seres Humanos
Insetos Vetores/virologia
Saúde da População Rural
Saúde da População Urbana
Zika virus
Infecção pelo Zika virus/prevenção & controle
Infecção pelo Zika virus/transmissão
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Insecticides); PAM1AI9KU1 (Naled)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180226
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180226
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180121
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191555


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[PMID]:29420284
[Au] Autor:Hemingway J
[Ad] Endereço:Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK. janet.hemingway@lstmed.ac.uk.
[Ti] Título:Response: Integrated approach to malaria control.
[So] Source:Science;359(6375):529, 2018 02 02.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Malária
Controle de Mosquitos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1126/science.aar8094


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[PMID]:29420283
[Au] Autor:Koenraadt CJM; Takken W
[Ad] Endereço:Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University, 6700 AA, Netherlands. sander.koenraadt@wur.nl.
[Ti] Título:Integrated approach to malaria control.
[So] Source:Science;359(6375):528-529, 2018 02 02.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Malária
Controle de Mosquitos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Seres Humanos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180222
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180222
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1126/science.aar7554


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[PMID]:29346408
[Au] Autor:Wanzira H; Eganyu T; Mulebeke R; Bukenya F; Echodu D; Adoke Y
[Ad] Endereço:Pilgrim Africa, Kampala, Uganda.
[Ti] Título:Long lasting insecticidal bed nets ownership, access and use in a high malaria transmission setting before and after a mass distribution campaign in Uganda.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191191, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:INTRODUCTION: Uganda is conducting a second mass LLIN distribution campaign and Katakwi district recently received LLINs as part of this activity. This study was conducted to measure the success of the campaign in this setting, an area of high transmission, with the objectives to estimate LLIN ownership, access and use pre and post campaign implementation. METHODS: Two identical cross sectional surveys, based on the Malaria Indicator Survey methodology, were conducted in three sub-counties in this district (Kapujan, Magoro and Toroma), six months apart, one before and another after the mass distribution campaign. Data on three main LLIN indicators including; household LLIN ownership, population with access to an LLIN and use were collected using a household and a women's questionnaire identical to the Malaria Indicator Survey. RESULTS: A total of 601 and 607 households were randomly selected in survey one and two respectively. At baseline, 60.57% (56.53-64.50) of households owned at least one net for every two persons who stayed in the household the night before the survey which significantly increased to 70.35% (66.54-73.96) after the campaign (p = 0.001). Similarly, the percentage of the household population with access to an LLIN significantly increased from 84.76% (82.99-86.52) to 91.57% (90.33-92.81), p = 0.001 and the percentage of household population that slept under an LLIN the night before the survey also significantly increased from 56.85% (55.06-58.82) to 81.72% (76.75-83.21), p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: The LLIN mass campaign successfully achieved the national target of over eighty-five percent of the population with access to an LLIN in this setting, however, universal household coverage and use were fourteen and three percent points less than the national target respectively. This is useful for malaria programs to consider during the planning of future campaigns by tailoring efforts around deficient areas like mechanisms to increase universal coverage and behavior change communication.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Mosquiteiros Tratados com Inseticida/utilização
Malária/prevenção & controle
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adolescente
Adulto
Criança
Pré-Escolar
Estudos Transversais
Feminino
Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde
Seres Humanos
Lactente
Recém-Nascido
Malária/transmissão
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Controle de Mosquitos/métodos
Programas Nacionais de Saúde
Gravidez
Inquéritos e Questionários
Uganda
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191191


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[PMID]:29257356
[Au] Autor:Lee JH; Bennett B; DePaula E
[Ti] Título:An Estimation of Potential Vector Control Effect of Gravid Mosquito Trapping in Fort Worth, Texas.
[So] Source:J Environ Health;79(1):14-19, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:0022-0892
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Entomological surveillance is an essential component for integrated vector management (IVM), the current best practice for West Nile virus (WNV) prevention and control. The significance of vector mosquito surveillance, however, is not always recognized by the public, which increases vulnerability of IVM programs to elimination or downsizing when virus activities are low, particularly during interepidemics of WNV. In order to increase public recognition, the unrecognized contribution of mosquito surveillance with gravid (egg-carrying) mosquito trapping to WNV vector control was estimated using a novel approach. This approach includes development of a quantitative model to estimate the number of female progeny from a gravid mosquito and application of the model with mosquito surveillance data to estimate the potential vector control effect of gravid mosquito trapping. Applying this approach, the potential WNV vector control effect of 2013 surveillance activities in Fort Worth, Texas, was estimated to almost 1,590,000 female mosquitoes by capturing 44,654 females.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Controle de Mosquitos
Mosquitos Vetores
Febre do Nilo Ocidental/prevenção & controle
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Feminino
Modelos Teóricos
Controle de Mosquitos/estatística & dados numéricos
Vigilância da População/métodos
Texas
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1802
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180220
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180220
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171220
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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[PMID]:29293501
[Au] Autor:Pérez D; Van der Stuyft P; Toledo ME; Ceballos E; Fabré F; Lefèvre P
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Tropical Medicine Pedro Kourí, Havana, Cuba.
[Ti] Título:Insecticide treated curtains and residual insecticide treatment to control Aedes aegypti: An acceptability study in Santiago de Cuba.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(1):e0006115, 2018 01.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Within the context of a field trial conducted by the Cuban vector control program (AaCP), we assessed acceptability of insecticide-treated curtains (ITCs) and residual insecticide treatment (RIT) with deltamethrin by the community. We also assessed the potential influence of interviewees' risk perceptions for getting dengue and disease severity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We embedded a qualitative study using in-depth interviews in a cluster randomized trial (CRT) testing the effectiveness of ITCs and RIT in Santiago de Cuba. In-depth interviews (N = 38) were conducted four and twelve months after deployment of the tools with people who accepted the tools, who stopped using them and who did not accept the tools. Data analysis was deductive. Main reasons for accepting ITCs at the start of the trial were perceived efficacy and not being harmful to health. Constraints linked to manufacturer instructions were the main reason for not using ITCs. People stopped using the ITCs due to perceived allergy, toxicity and low efficacy. Few heads of households refused RIT despite the noting reasons for rejection, such as allergy, health hazard and toxicity. Positive opinions of the vector control program influenced acceptability of both tools. However, frequent insecticide fogging as part of routine AaCP vector control actions diminished perceived efficacy of both tools and, therefore, acceptability. Fifty percent of interviewees did feel at risk for getting dengue and considered dengue a severe disease. However, this did not appear to influence acceptability of ITCs or RIT. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Acceptability of ITCs and RIT was linked to acceptability of AaCP routine vector control activities. However, uptake and use were not always an indication of acceptability. Factors leading to acceptability may be best identified using qualitative methods, but more research is needed on the concept of acceptability and its measurement.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aedes/efeitos dos fármacos
Dengue/prevenção & controle
Insetos Vetores/efeitos dos fármacos
Mosquiteiros Tratados com Inseticida
Inseticidas/farmacologia
Controle de Mosquitos/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Adulto
Idoso
Animais
Cuba/epidemiologia
Dengue/epidemiologia
Dengue/parasitologia
Características da Família
Feminino
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Meia-Idade
Nitrilos/farmacologia
Piretrinas/farmacologia
Inquéritos e Questionários
Adulto Jovem
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (Insecticides); 0 (Nitriles); 0 (Pyrethrins); 2JTS8R821G (decamethrin)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180210
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180210
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:180103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006115


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[PMID]:29226959
[Au] Autor:Walshe DP; Garner P; Adeel AA; Pyke GH; Burkot TR
[Ad] Endereço:Department of Clinical Sciences, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, UK, L3 5QA.
[Ti] Título:Larvivorous fish for preventing malaria transmission.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;12:CD008090, 2017 12 11.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] País de publicação:England
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:BACKGROUND: Adult female Anopheles mosquitoes can transmit Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria. Some fish species eat mosquito larvae and pupae. In disease control policy documents, the World Health Organization (WHO) includes biological control of malaria vectors by stocking ponds, rivers, and water collections near where people live with larvivorous fish to reduce Plasmodium parasite transmission. In the past, the Global Fund has financed larvivorous fish programmes in some countries, and, with increasing efforts in eradication of malaria, policymakers may return to this option. Therefore, we assessed the evidence base for larvivorous fish programmes in malaria control. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether introducing larvivorous fish to anopheline larval habitats impacts Plasmodium parasite transmission. We also sought to summarize studies that evaluated whether introducing larvivorous fish influences the density and presence of Anopheles larvae and pupae in water sources. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (PubMed); Embase (Ovid); CABS Abstracts; LILACS; and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) up to 6 July 2017. We checked the reference lists of all studies identified by the search. We examined references listed in review articles and previously compiled bibliographies to look for eligible studies. Also we contacted researchers in the field and the authors of studies that met the inclusion criteria for additional information regarding potential studies for inclusion and ongoing studies. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published in 2013. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs, including controlled before-and-after studies, controlled time series, and controlled interrupted time series studies from malaria-endemic regions that introduced fish as a larvicide and reported on malaria in the community or the density of the adult anopheline population. In the absence of direct evidence of an effect on transmission, we performed a secondary analysis on studies that evaluated the effect of introducing larvivorous fish on the density or presence of immature anopheline mosquitoes (larvae and pupae forms) in water sources to determine whether this intervention has any potential that may justify further research in the control of malaria vectors. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened each article by title and abstract, and examined potentially relevant studies for inclusion using an eligibility form. At least two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. If relevant data were unclear or were not reported, we contacted the study authors for clarification. We presented data in tables, and we summarized studies that evaluated the effects of introducing fish on anopheline immature density or presence, or both. We used the GRADE approach to summarize the certainty of the evidence. We also examined whether the included studies reported any possible adverse impact of introducing larvivorous fish on non-target native species. MAIN RESULTS: We identified no studies that reported the effects of introducing larvivorous fish on the primary outcomes of this review: malaria infection in nearby communities, entomological inoculation rate, or on adult Anopheles density.For the secondary analysis, we examined the effects of introducing larvivorous fish on the density and presence of anopheline larvae and pupae in community water sources, and found 15 small studies with a follow-up period between 22 days and five years. These studies were undertaken in Sri Lanka (two studies), India (three studies), Ethiopia (one study), Kenya (two studies), Sudan (one study), Grande Comore Island (one study), Korea (two studies), Indonesia (one study), and Tajikistan (two studies). These studies were conducted in a variety of settings, including localized water bodies (such as wells, domestic water containers, fishponds, and pools (seven studies); riverbed pools below dams (two studies)); rice field plots (five studies); and water canals (two studies). All included studies were at high risk of bias. The research was insufficient to determine whether larvivorous fish reduce the density of Anopheles larvae and pupae (12 studies, unpooled data, very low certainty evidence). Some studies with high stocking levels of fish seemed to arrest the increase in immature anopheline populations, or to reduce the number of immature anopheline mosquitoes, compared with controls. However, this finding was not consistent, and in studies that showed a decrease in immature anopheline populations, the effect was not always consistently sustained. In contrast, some studies reported larvivorous fish reduced the number of water sources withAnopheles larvae and pupae (five studies, unpooled data, low certainty evidence).None of the included studies reported effects of larvivorous fish on local native fish populations or other species. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We do not know whether introducing larvivorous fish reduces malaria transmission or the density of adult anopheline mosquito populations.In research studies that examined the effects on immature anopheline stages of introducing fish to potential malaria vector larval habitats, high stocking levels of fish may reduce the density or presence of immature anopheline mosquitoes in the short term. We do not know whether this translates into impact on malaria transmission. Our interpretation of the current evidence is that countries should not invest in fish stocking as a stand alone or supplementary larval control measure in any malaria transmission areas outside the context of research using carefully controlled field studies or quasi-experimental designs. Such research should examine the effects on native fish and other non-target species.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Anopheles
Vetores de Doenças
Comportamento Alimentar
Peixes
Malária/prevenção & controle
Controle de Mosquitos/métodos
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Animais
Anopheles/parasitologia
Reservatórios de Doenças/parasitologia
Larva
Malária/transmissão
Plasmodium
Densidade Demográfica
Água/parasitologia
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Nome de substância:
059QF0KO0R (Water)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180123
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180123
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171212
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD008090.pub3


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[PMID]:29216317
[Au] Autor:Fraser JE; De Bruyne JT; Iturbe-Ormaetxe I; Stepnell J; Burns RL; Flores HA; O'Neill SL
[Ad] Endereço:Institute of Vector-Borne Disease, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia.
[Ti] Título:Novel Wolbachia-transinfected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes possess diverse fitness and vector competence phenotypes.
[So] Source:PLoS Pathog;13(12):e1006751, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7374
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Wolbachia pipientis from Drosophila melanogaster (wMel) is an endosymbiotic bacterium that restricts transmission of human pathogenic flaviviruses and alphaviruses, including dengue, Zika, and chikungunya viruses, when introduced into the mosquito vector Aedes aegypti. To date, wMel-infected Ae. aegypti have been released in field trials in 5 countries to evaluate the effectiveness of this strategy for disease control. Despite the success in establishing wMel-infected mosquitoes in wild populations, and the well-characterized antiviral capabilities of wMel, transinfecting different or additional Wolbachia strains into Ae. aegypti may improve disease impact, and perhaps more importantly, could provide a strategy to account for the possible evolution of resistant arboviruses. Here, we report the successful transinfection of Ae. aegypti with the Wolbachia strains wMelCS (D. melanogaster), wRi (D. simulans) and wPip (Culex quinquefasciatus) and assess the effects on Ae. aegypti fitness, cytoplasmic incompatibility, tissue tropism and pathogen blocking in a laboratory setting. The results demonstrate that wMelCS provides a similar degree of protection against dengue virus as wMel following an infectious blood meal, and significantly reduces viral RNA levels beyond that of wMel following a direct challenge with infectious virus in mosquitoes, with no additional fitness cost to the host. The protection provided by wRi is markedly weaker than that of wMelCS, consistent with previous characterisations of these lines in Drosophila, while wPip was found to substantially reduce the fitness of Ae. aegypti. Thus, we determine wMelCS as a key candidate for further testing in field-relevant fitness tests and viremic blood feeding challenges in a clinical setting to determine if it may represent an alternative Wolbachia strain with more desirable attributes than wMel for future field testing.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aedes/microbiologia
Transmissão Vertical de Doença Infecciosa/veterinária
Mosquitos Vetores/microbiologia
Wolbachia/crescimento & desenvolvimento
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Aedes/crescimento & desenvolvimento
Aedes/fisiologia
Aedes/virologia
Animais
Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos
Culex/microbiologia
Vírus da Dengue/isolamento & purificação
Vírus da Dengue/fisiologia
Drosophila melanogaster/microbiologia
Drosophila simulans/microbiologia
Feminino
Fertilidade
Masculino
Controle de Mosquitos/métodos
Mosquitos Vetores/fisiologia
Mosquitos Vetores/virologia
Especificidade de Órgãos
Ovário/microbiologia
Ovário/fisiologia
RNA Viral/isolamento & purificação
Glândulas Salivares/microbiologia
Glândulas Salivares/fisiologia
Caracteres Sexuais
Especificidade da Espécie
Análise de Sobrevida
Tropismo Viral
Wolbachia/isolamento & purificação
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:COMPARATIVE STUDY; EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Nome de substância:
0 (RNA, Viral)
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180109
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180109
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.ppat.1006751


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[PMID]:29261766
[Au] Autor:Ndenga BA; Mutuku FM; Ngugi HN; Mbakaya JO; Aswani P; Musunzaji PS; Vulule J; Mukoko D; Kitron U; LaBeaud AD
[Ad] Endereço:Centre for Global Health Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kisumu, Kenya.
[Ti] Título:Characteristics of Aedes aegypti adult mosquitoes in rural and urban areas of western and coastal Kenya.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(12):e0189971, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] País de publicação:United States
[La] Idioma:eng
[Ab] Resumo:Aedes aegypti is the main vector for yellow fever, dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses. Recent outbreaks of dengue and chikungunya have been reported in Kenya. Presence and abundance of this vector is associated with the risk for the occurrence and transmission of these diseases. This study aimed to characterize the presence and abundance of Ae. aegypti adult mosquitoes from rural and urban sites in western and coastal regions of Kenya. Presence and abundance of Ae. aegypti adult mosquitoes were determined indoors and outdoors in two western (urban Kisumu and rural Chulaimbo) and two coastal (urban Ukunda and rural Msambweni) sites in Kenya. Sampling was performed using quarterly human landing catches, monthly Prokopack automated aspirators and monthly Biogents-sentinel traps. A total of 2,229 adult Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were collected: 785 (35.2%) by human landing catches, 459 (20.6%) by Prokopack aspiration and 985 (44.2%) by Biogents-sentinel traps. About three times as many Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were collected in urban than rural sites (1,650 versus 579). Comparable numbers were collected in western (1,196) and coastal (1,033) sites. Over 80% were collected outdoors through human landing catches and Prokopack aspiration. The probability of collecting Ae. aegypti mosquitoes by human landing catches was significantly higher in the afternoon than morning hours (P<0.001), outdoors than indoors (P<0.001) and in urban than rural sites (P = 0.008). Significantly more Ae. aegypti mosquitoes were collected using Prokopack aspiration outdoors than indoors (P<0.001) and in urban than rural areas (P<0.001). Significantly more mosquitoes were collected using Biogents-sentinel traps in urban than rural areas (P = 0.008) and in western than coastal sites (P = 0.006). The probability of exposure to Ae. aegypti bites was highest in urban areas, outdoors and in the afternoon hours. These characteristics have major implications for the possible transmission of arboviral diseases and for the planning of surveillance and control programs.
[Mh] Termos MeSH primário: Aedes/fisiologia
Ecossistema
População Rural
População Urbana
[Mh] Termos MeSH secundário: Envelhecimento
Animais
Automação
Intervalos de Confiança
Geografia
Seres Humanos
Quênia/epidemiologia
Controle de Mosquitos
[Pt] Tipo de publicação:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Mês de entrada:1801
[Cu] Atualização por classe:180108
[Lr] Data última revisão:
180108
[Sb] Subgrupo de revista:IM
[Da] Data de entrada para processamento:171221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0189971



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