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PMID:29381714
Autor:Walther B; Klein KS; Barton AK; Semmler T; Huber C; Wolf SA; Tedin K; Merle R; Mitrach F; Guenther S; Lübke-Becker A; Gehlen H
Endereço:Institute of Microbiology and Epizootics, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
Título:Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii among horses entering a veterinary teaching hospital: The contemporary "Trojan Horse".
Fonte:PLoS One; 13(1):e0191873, 2018.
ISSN:1932-6203
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Pathogens frequently associated with multi-drug resistant (MDR) phenotypes, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from horses admitted to horse clinics, pose a risk for animal patients and personnel in horse clinics. To estimate current rates of colonization, a total of 341 equine patients were screened for carriage of zoonotic indicator pathogens at hospital admission. Horses showing clinical signs associated with colic (n = 233) or open wounds (n = 108) were selected for microbiological examination of nostril swabs, faecal samples and wound swabs taken from the open wound group. The results showed alarming carriage rates of Gram-negative MDR pathogens in equine patients: 10.7% (34 of 318) of validated faecal specimens were positive for ESBL-E (94%: ESBL-producing Escherichia coli), with recorded rates of 10.5% for the colic and 11% for the open wound group. 92.7% of the ESBL-producing E. coli were phenotypically resistant to three or more classes of antimicrobials. A. baumannii was rarely detected (0.9%), and all faecal samples investigated were negative for Salmonella, both directly and after two enrichment steps. Screening results for the equine nostril swabs showed detection rates for ESBL-E of 3.4% among colic patients and 0.9% in the open wound group, with an average rate of 2.6% (9/340) for both indications. For all 41 ESBL-producing E. coli isolated, a broad heterogeneity was revealed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns and whole genome sequencing (WGS) -analysis. However, a predominance of sequence type complex (STC)10 and STC1250 was observed, including several novel STs. The most common genes associated with ESBL-production were identified as blaCTX-M-1 (31/41; 75.6%) and blaSHV-12 (24.4%). The results of this study reveal a disturbingly large fraction of multi-drug resistant and ESBL-producing E. coli among equine patients, posing a clear threat to established hygiene management systems and work-place safety of veterinary staff in horse clinics.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Nome de substância:EC 3.5.2.6 (beta-Lactamases)


  2 / 981 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28747096
Autor:Gates MC; Hinds HJ; Dale A
Endereço:a Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences , Massey University , Private Bag 11-222, Palmerston North 4442 , New Zealand.
Título:Preliminary description of aging cats and dogs presented to a New Zealand first-opinion veterinary clinic at end-of-life.
Fonte:N Z Vet J; 65(6):313-317, 2017 Nov.
ISSN:1176-0710
País de publicação:England
Idioma:eng
Resumo:AIMS To conduct a preliminary investigation into the chronic disease conditions and clinical signs present in aging New Zealand companion animals at end-of-life and to describe the timing, circumstances, and manner of death. METHODS The medical records database of a first-opinion, companion animal, veterinary practice in Auckland, New Zealand was searched to identify all canine and feline patients ≥7 years of age that were subjected to euthanasia or cremated in the period between July 2012-June 2014. The free-text medical notes were analysed for information on the circumstances surrounding the death, previous diagnoses of chronic disease conditions, and the presence of clinical signs associated with decreased quality-of-life at the time of euthanasia. RESULTS The median age at death was 15 (max 22) years for the 130 cats and 12 (max 17) years for the 68 dogs in the study sample. Euthanasia at the clinic was carried out for 119/130 (91%) cats and 62/68 (91%) dogs, with the remainder recorded as having an unassisted death. The frequency of deaths was highest during December for both cats and dogs. Cost was mentioned as an issue in the medical records for 39/181 (21.6%) patients that were subjected to euthanasia. At the time of euthanasia, 92/119 (77.3%) cats and 43/62 (69.4%) dogs were recorded as having >1 clinical sign associated with a decreased quality-of-life. Inappetence and non-specific decline were the two most commonly recorded clinical signs for both dogs and cats. Cardiovascular disease (44/130, 34%), renal failure (40/130, 31%), and malignant neoplasia (36/130, 28%) were the most common chronic disease conditions recorded for cats. Degenerative joint disease (22/68, 32%), malignant neoplasia (14/68, 21%), and cardiovascular disease (8/68, 12%) were the most common chronic disease conditions recorded for dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE These preliminary findings highlight that aging companion animals in New Zealand frequently have chronic disease conditions and clinical signs that may potentially be associated with decreased quality-of-life at the time of death. Further in-depth studies are required to determine whether there is a greater role for veterinarians in counselling owners about end-of-life care and euthanasia decisions.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  3 / 981 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28816638
Autor:Rojas I; Barquero-Calvo E; van Balen JC; Rojas N; Muñoz-Vargas L; Hoet AE
Endereço:1 Programa de Investigación en Enfermedades Tropicales (PIET), Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional , Heredia, Costa Rica .
Título:High Prevalence of Multidrug-Resistant Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus at the Largest Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Costa Rica.
Fonte:Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis; 17(9):645-653, 2017 Sep.
ISSN:1557-7759
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a pathogen associated with severe infections in companion animals present in the community, and it is diagnosed in animals admitted to veterinary hospitals. However, reports that describe the circulation of MRSA in animal populations and veterinary settings in Latin America are scarce. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and investigate the molecular epidemiology of MRSA in the environment of the largest veterinary teaching hospital in Costa Rica. Preselected contact surfaces were sampled twice within a 6-week period. Antimicrobial resistance, SCCmec type, Panton-Valentine leukocidin screening, USA type, and clonality were assessed in all recovered isolates. Overall, MRSA was isolated from 26.5% (27/102) of the surfaces sampled, with doors, desks, and examination tables most frequently contaminated. Molecular analysis demonstrated a variety of surfaces from different sections of the hospital contaminated by three highly related clones/pulsotypes. All, but one of the isolates were characterized as multidrug-resistant SCCmec type IV-USA700, a strain sporadically described in other countries and often classified as community acquired. The detection and frequency of this unique strain in this veterinary setting suggest Costa Rica has a distinctive MRSA ecology when compared with other countries/regions. The high level of environmental contamination highlights the necessity to establish and enforce standard cleaning and disinfection protocols to minimize further spread of this pathogen and reduce the risk of nosocomial and/or occupational transmission of MRSA.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE
Nome de substância:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Bacterial Proteins); 0 (Bacterial Toxins); 0 (Exotoxins); 0 (Leukocidins); 0 (Panton-Valentine leukocidin); 0 (Penicillin-Binding Proteins); 0 (mecA protein, Staphylococcus aureus)


  4 / 981 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28724873
Autor:Ooshima T
Endereço:Regulation and Safety Division, Regulatory Committee, Veterinary Medical Device Expert Committee, Japan Medical Imaging and Radiological Systems Industries Association.
Título:Points of Attention When Selling a Medical Device for Human to a Veterinary Hospital.
Fonte:Nihon Hoshasen Gijutsu Gakkai Zasshi; 73(7):597-599, 2017.
ISSN:0369-4305
País de publicação:Japan
Idioma:jpn
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


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PMID:28697869
Autor:Levy JK; Bard KM; Tucker SJ; Diskant PD; Dingman PA
Endereço:Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, 2015 SW 16th Avenue, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA. Electronic address: levyjk@ufl.edu.
Título:Perioperative mortality in cats and dogs undergoing spay or castration at a high-volume clinic.
Fonte:Vet J; 224:11-15, 2017 Jun.
ISSN:1532-2971
País de publicação:England
Idioma:eng
Resumo:High volume spay-neuter (spay-castration) clinics have been established to improve population control of cats and dogs to reduce the number of animals admitted to and euthanazed in animal shelters. The rise in the number of spay-neuter clinics in the USA has been accompanied by concern about the quality of animal care provided in high volume facilities, which focus on minimally invasive, time saving techniques, high throughput and simultaneous management of multiple animals under various stages of anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine perioperative mortality for cats and dogs in a high volume spay-neuter clinic in the USA. Electronic medical records and a written mortality log were used to collect data for 71,557 cats and 42,349 dogs undergoing spay-neuter surgery from 2010 to 2016 at a single high volume clinic in Florida. Perioperative mortality was defined as deaths occurring in the 24h period starting with the administration of the first sedation or anesthetic drugs. Perioperative mortality was reported for 34 cats and four dogs for an overall mortality of 3.3 animals/10,000 surgeries (0.03%). The risk of mortality was more than twice as high for females (0.05%) as for males (0.02%) (P=0.008) and five times as high for cats (0.05%) as for dogs (0.009%) (P=0.0007). High volume spay-neuter surgery was associated with a lower mortality rate than that previously reported in low volume clinics, approaching that achieved in human surgery. This is likely to be due to the young, healthy population of dogs and cats, and the continuous refinement of techniques based on experience and the skills and proficiency of teams that specialize in a limited spectrum of procedures.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  6 / 981 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28346803
Autor:Adams RJ; Mathys DA; Mollenkopf DF; Whittle A; Daniels JB; Wittum TE
Endereço:1 Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University , Columbus, Ohio.
Título:Carbapenemase-Producing Aeromonas veronii Disseminated in the Environment of an Equine Specialty Hospital.
Fonte:Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis; 17(6):439-442, 2017 Jun.
ISSN:1557-7759
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumo:The emergence of bacterial resistance to carbapenem antibiotics is an urgent public health threat. Carbapenem drugs are a last resort treatment option for life-threatening infections. The frequent use of broad-spectrum antibiotics to treat hospitalized patients provides significant selection pressure favoring the emergence and dissemination of resistant organisms, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). CREs have been reported in animal populations, but only rarely in horses. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of CRE in the environment of a referral equine specialty hospital. Environmental samples were collected on seven different sampling dates. Four clonal carbapenemase-producing Aeromonas veronii were recovered from 315 sampled surfaces (1.3%). All four isolates harbored the carbapenemase-producing, metallo-ß-lactamase gene bla , although corresponding minimum inhibitory concentrations were within the susceptible range for imipenem and meropenem. All had an identical multilocus sequence type with a previously unreported allelic profile and contained multiple plasmids. To our knowledge, this recovery of bla -harboring A. veronii is the first report of carbapenemase-producing bacteria in the environment of an equine veterinary hospital. However, the low recovery rate suggests that environmental contamination is uncommon. Appropriate hospital cleaning and disinfection protocols are necessary to maintain a low risk of contamination for patients and personnel.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE
Nome de substância:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Bacterial Proteins); EC 3.5.2.6 (beta-Lactamases); EC 3.5.2.6 (carbapenemase)


  7 / 981 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28306484
Autor:Jones K; Case JB; Evans B; Monnet E
Título:Evaluation of the economic and clinical feasibility of introducing rigid endoscopy and laparoscopy to a small animal general practice.
Fonte:J Am Vet Med Assoc; 250(7):795-800, 2017 Apr 01.
ISSN:1943-569X
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumo:OBJECTIVE To evaluate the economic and clinical feasibility of introducing rigid endoscopy and laparoscopy to a small animal general practice. DESIGN Prospective study. SAMPLE A single 2-veterinarian small animal practice in southern California. PROCEDURES In early 2012, endoscopic equipment was purchased, and both veterinarians in the practice undertook training in rigid endoscopic and laparoscopic procedures. Subsequently, information for client-owned animals that underwent endoscopic and laparoscopic procedures during a 12-month period (2012 to 2013) was collected. Cost of equipment and training, revenue generated, specific procedures performed, surgery time, complications, and client satisfaction were evaluated. RESULTS 78 endoscopic procedures were performed in 73 patients, including 71 dogs, 1 cat, and 1 rabbit. Cost of endoscopic and laparoscopic equipment and training in the first year was $14,809.71; most equipment was financed through a 5-year lease at a total cost of $57,507.70 ($ 10,675.20/y). Total revenue generated in the first year was $50,423.63. The most common procedures performed were ovariectomy (OVE; n = 49), prophylactic gastropexy (6), and video otoscopy (12). Mean ± SD surgery times for OVE (n = 44) and for OVE with gastropexy (5) were 63.7 ± 19.7 minutes and 73.0 ± 33.5 minutes; respectively. Twelve of 54 patients undergoing laparoscopic procedures experienced minor intraoperative complications. Conversion to laparotomy was not required in any patient. There were no major complications. All 49 clients available for follow-up were satisfied. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE With appropriate training and equipment, incorporation of basic rigid endoscopy and laparoscopy may be feasible in small animal general practice. However, results of the present study are not applicable to all veterinarians and practice settings, and patient safety considerations should always be paramount.
Tipo de publicação: EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE


  8 / 981 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28263113
Autor:Matthews NS; Mohn TJ; Yang M; Spofford N; Marsh A; Faunt K; Lund EM; Lefebvre SL
Título:Factors associated with anesthetic-related death in dogs and cats in primary care veterinary hospitals.
Fonte:J Am Vet Med Assoc; 250(6):655-665, 2017 Mar 15.
ISSN:1943-569X
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumo:OBJECTIVE To identify risk factors for anesthetic-related death in pet dogs and cats. DESIGN Matched case-control study. ANIMALS 237 dogs and 181 cats. PROCEDURES Electronic medical records from 822 hospitals were examined to identify dogs and cats that underwent general anesthesia (including sedation) or sedation alone and had death attributable to the anesthetic episode ≤ 7 days later (case animals; 115 dogs and 89 cats) or survived > 7 days afterward (control animals [matched by species and hospital]; 122 dogs and 92 cats). Information on patient characteristics and data related to the anesthesia session were extracted. Conditional multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with anesthetic-related death for each species. RESULTS The anesthetic-related death rate was higher for cats (11/10,000 anesthetic episodes [0.11%]) than for dogs (5/10,000 anesthetic episodes [0.05%]). Increasing age was associated with increased odds of death for both species, as was undergoing nonelective (vs elective) procedures. Odds of death for dogs were significantly greater when preanesthetic physical examination results were not recorded (vs recorded) or when preanesthetic Hct was outside (vs within) the reference range. Odds of death for cats were greater when intra-anesthesia records for oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry were absent. Underweight dogs had almost 15 times the odds of death as nonunderweight dogs; for cats, odds of death increased with increasing body weight (but not with overweight body condition). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Several factors were associated with anesthetic-related death in cats and dogs. This information may be useful for development of strategies to reduce anesthetic-related risks when possible and for education of pet owners about anesthetic risks.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  9 / 981 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28237237
Autor:Hennenfent A; DelVento V; Davies-Cole J; Johnson-Clarke F
Endereço:CDC/CSTE Applied Epidemiology Fellowship Program, District of Columbia Department of Health, Center for Policy, Planning and Evaluation, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address: Andrew.Hennenfent@dc.gov.
Título:Expanding veterinary biosurveillance in Washington, DC: The creation and utilization of an electronic-based online veterinary surveillance system.
Fonte:Prev Vet Med; 138:70-78, 2017 Mar 01.
ISSN:1873-1716
País de publicação:Netherlands
Idioma:eng
Resumo:OBJECTIVES: To enhance the early detection of emerging infectious diseases and bioterrorism events using companion animal-based surveillance. METHODS: Washington, DC, small animal veterinary facilities (n=17) were surveyed to determine interest in conducting infectious disease surveillance. Using these results, an electronic-based online reporting system was developed and launched in August 2015 to monitor rates of canine influenza, canine leptospirosis, antibiotic resistant infections, canine parvovirus, and syndromic disease trends. RESULTS: Nine of the 10 facilities that responded expressed interest conducting surveillance. In September 2015, 17 canine parvovirus cases were reported. In response, a campaign encouraging regular veterinary preventative care was launched and featured on local media platforms. Additionally, during the system's first year of operation it detected 5 canine leptospirosis cases and 2 antibiotic resistant infections. No canine influenza cases were reported and syndromic surveillance compliance varied, peaking during National Special Security Events. CONCLUSIONS: Small animal veterinarians and the general public are interested in companion animal disease surveillance. The system described can serve as a model for establishing similar systems to monitor disease trends of public health importance in pet populations and enhance biosurveillance capabilities.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  10 / 981 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28216692
Autor:Milani M
Título:Retro communication.
Fonte:Can Vet J; 58(2):193-194, 2017 Feb.
ISSN:0008-5286
País de publicação:Canada
Idioma:eng
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE



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