Base de dados : MEDLINE
Pesquisa : Z01.678.100.373.937 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 7195 [refinar]
Mostrando: 1 .. 10   no formato [Longo]

página 1 de 720 ir para página                         

  1 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
PMID:29338017
Autor:Graham RMA; Hiley L; Rathnayake IU; Jennison AV
Endereço:Public Health Microbiology, Forensic and Scientific Services, Queensland Department of Health, Coopers Plains, Queensland, Australia.
Título:Comparative genomics identifies distinct lineages of S. Enteritidis from Queensland, Australia.
Fonte:PLoS One; 13(1):e0191042, 2018.
ISSN:1932-6203
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Salmonella enterica is a major cause of gastroenteritis and foodborne illness in Australia where notification rates in the state of Queensland are the highest in the country. S. Enteritidis is among the five most common serotypes reported in Queensland and it is a priority for epidemiological surveillance due to concerns regarding its emergence in Australia. Using whole genome sequencing, we have analysed the genomic epidemiology of 217 S. Enteritidis isolates from Queensland, and observed that they fall into three distinct clades, which we have differentiated as Clades A, B and C. Phage types and MLST sequence types differed between the clades and comparative genomic analysis has shown that each has a unique profile of prophage and genomic islands. Several of the phage regions present in the S. Enteritidis reference strain P125109 were absent in Clades A and C, and these clades also had difference in the presence of pathogenicity islands, containing complete SPI-6 and SPI-19 regions, while P125109 does not. Antimicrobial resistance markers were found in 39 isolates, all but one of which belonged to Clade B. Phylogenetic analysis of the Queensland isolates in the context of 170 international strains showed that Queensland Clade B isolates group together with the previously identified global clade, while the other two clades are distinct and appear largely restricted to Australia. Locally sourced environmental isolates included in this analysis all belonged to Clades A and C, which is consistent with the theory that these clades are a source of locally acquired infection, while Clade B isolates are mostly travel related.
Tipo de publicação: COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE


  2 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
PMID:28450898
Autor:Wyndow N; Crossley KM; Vicenzino B; Tucker K; Collins NJ
Endereço:School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, 4072 QLD Australia.
Título:A single-blinded, randomized, parallel group superiority trial investigating the effects of footwear and custom foot orthoses versus footwear alone in individuals with patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis: a phase II pilot trial protocol.
Fonte:J Foot Ankle Res; 10:19, 2017.
ISSN:1757-1146
País de publicação:England
Idioma:eng
Resumo:BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is a common condition, yet information regarding conservative management is lacking. Foot orthoses are an effective intervention for improving pain and function in younger individuals with patellofemoral pain and may be effective in those with patellofemoral osteoarthritis. This pilot study will seek to establish the feasibility of a phase III randomised controlled trial to investigate whether foot orthoses worn in prescribed motion controlled footwear are superior to prescribed motion control footwear alone in the management of patellofemoral osteoarthritis. METHODS/DESIGN: This phase II pilot clinical trial is designed as a randomized, single-blind, parallel group, two arm, superiority trial. The trial will recruit 44 participants from Queensland and Tasmania, Australia. Volunteers aged 40 years and over must have clinical symptoms and radiographic evidence of patellofemoral osteoarthritis to be eligible for inclusion. Those eligible will be randomized to receive either foot orthoses and prescribed motion control shoes, or prescribed motion control shoes alone, to be worn for a period of 4 months. The feasibility of a phase III clinical trial will be evaluated by assessing factors such as recruitment rate, number of eligible participants, participant compliance with the study protocol, adverse events, and drop-out rate. A secondary aim of the study will be to determine completion rates and calculate effect sizes for patient reported outcome measures such as knee-related symptoms, function, quality of life, kinesiophobia, self-efficacy, general and mental health, and physical activity at 2 and 4 months. Primary outcomes will be reported descriptively while effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals will be calculated for the secondary outcome measures. Data will be analysed using an intention-to-treat principle. DISCUSSION: The results of this pilot trial will help determine the feasibility of a phase III clinical trial investigating whether foot orthoses plus motion control footwear are superior to motion control footwear alone in individuals with patellofemoral osteoarthritis. A Phase III clinical trial will help guide footwear and foot orthoses recommendations in the clinical management of this disorder. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Retrospectively registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12615000002583. Date registered: 07/01/15.
Tipo de publicação: CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE II; COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL


  3 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
PMID:29281731
Autor:Nyari S; Waugh CA; Dong J; Quigley BL; Hanger J; Loader J; Polkinghorne A; Timms P
Endereço:Centre for Animal Health Innovation, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland, Australia.
Título:Epidemiology of chlamydial infection and disease in a free-ranging koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) population.
Fonte:PLoS One; 12(12):e0190114, 2017.
ISSN:1932-6203
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Chlamydial disease continues to be one of the main factors threatening the long-term survival of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). Despite this, large epidemiological studies of chlamydial infection and disease in wild koala populations are lacking. A better understanding of the prevalence, transmission and pathogenesis is needed to improve control measures, such as the development of vaccines. We investigated the prevalence of Chlamydia pecorum infection and disease in 160 koalas in a peri-urban wild population in Queensland, Australia and found that 31% of koalas were Chlamydia PCR positive and 28% had clinically detectable chlamydial disease. Most infections were at the urogenital site (27%; both males and females) with only 14% at the ocular site. Interestingly, we found that 27% (4/15) of koalas considered to be sexually immature (9-13 months) were already infected with C. pecorum, suggesting that a significant percentage of animals are infected directly from their mother. Ocular infection levels were less prevalent with increasing age (8% in koalas older than 4 years), whereas the prevalence of urogenital tract infections remained high into older age (26% in koalas older than 4 years), suggesting that, after mother-to-young transmission, C. pecorum is predominantly a sexually transmitted infection. While 28% of koalas in this population had clinically detectable chlamydial disease (primarily urogenital tract disease), many PCR positive koalas had no detectable disease and importantly, not all diseased animals were PCR positive. We also observed higher chlamydial loads in koalas who were C. pecorum infected without clinical disease than in koalas who were C. pecorum infected with clinical disease. These results shed light on the potential mechanisms of transmission of C. pecorum in koalas and also guide future control measures, such as vaccination.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


  4 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
PMID:29233795
Autor:Stephen DM; Barnett AG
Endereço:Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
Título:Using Microsimulation to Estimate the Future Health and Economic Costs of Salmonellosis under Climate Change in Central Queensland, Australia.
Fonte:Environ Health Perspect; 125(12):127001, 2017 Dec 11.
ISSN:1552-9924
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumo:BACKGROUND: The incidence of salmonellosis, a costly foodborne disease, is rising in Australia. Salmonellosis increases during high temperatures and rainfall, and future incidence is likely to rise under climate change. Allocating funding to preventative strategies would be best informed by accurate estimates of salmonellosis costs under climate change and by knowing which population subgroups will be most affected. OBJECTIVE: We used microsimulation models to estimate the health and economic costs of salmonellosis in Central Queensland under climate change between 2016 and 2036 to inform preventative strategies. METHODS: We projected the entire population of Central Queensland to 2036 by simulating births, deaths, and migration, and salmonellosis and two resultant conditions, reactive arthritis and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. We estimated salmonellosis risks and costs under baseline conditions and under projected climate conditions for Queensland under the A1FI emissions scenario using composite projections from 6 global climate models (warm with reduced rainfall). We estimated the resulting costs based on direct medical expenditures combined with the value of lost quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) based on willingness-to-pay. RESULTS: Estimated costs of salmonellosis between 2016 and 2036 increased from 456.0 QALYs (95% CI: 440.3, 473.1) and AUD29,900,000 million (95% CI: AUD28,900,000, AUD31,600,000), assuming no climate change, to 485.9 QALYs (95% CI: 469.6, 503.5) and AUD31,900,000 (95% CI: AUD30,800,000, AUD33,000,000) under the climate change scenario. CONCLUSION: We applied a microsimulation approach to estimate the costs of salmonellosis and its sequelae in Queensland during 2016-2036 under baseline conditions and according to climate change projections. This novel application of microsimulation models demonstrates the models' potential utility to researchers for examining complex interactions between weather and disease to estimate future costs. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1370.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  5 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
Texto completo
PMID:28453311
Autor:Bates L; Scott-Parker B; Darvell M; Watson B
Endereço:a School of Criminology and Criminal Justice and Griffith Criminology Institute , Griffith University , Brisbane , Australia.
Título:Provisional drivers' perceptions of the impact of displaying P plates.
Fonte:Traffic Inj Prev; 18(8):820-825, 2017 11 17.
ISSN:1538-957X
País de publicação:England
Idioma:eng
Resumo:OBJECTIVE: P plates (or decals) identify a driver's license status to other road users. They are a compulsory part of the graduated driver licensing system in Queensland, Australia, for drivers on a P1 (provisional 1) or P2 (provisional 2) license. This study explored the perceptions of young drivers regarding the display of P plates (decals) in Queensland, Australia. METHODS: In this study, 226 young drivers with a provisional (intermediate/restricted) license completed a 30-min online survey between October 2013 and June 2014. t Tests were used to compare the opinions of people who displayed their plates nearly always with those who displayed them less frequently. RESULTS: Participants approved of the requirement to display P plates with 69% of those on a P1 license and 79% on a P2 license supporting the condition to display P1 (red) plates. Participants on a P1 license (62%) and a P2 license (68%) also approved the requirement to display P2 (green) plates. However, young drivers also perceived that the display of P plates (measured from 1 = never to 5 = nearly all the time) enabled newly licensed drivers to be targeted by police and other drivers (those who do not always display P plates: M = 3.72, SD = 0.94; those who nearly always display P plates: M = 3.43, SD = 1.09). CONCLUSIONS: The study findings suggest that participants who nearly always display their P plates are more likely to report that having to display their plates resulted in them driving more carefully.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  6 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
PMID:29251885
Autor:Keast K
Título:NOVEL TECHNIQUE AIMS TO TRANSFORM BREASTFEEDING.
Fonte:Aust Nurs Midwifery J; 24(6):34, 2016 12.
ISSN:2202-7114
País de publicação:Australia
Idioma:eng
Resumo:A Queensland midwife has developed a simple breastfeeding technique that will be piloted at a Brisbane hospital with new mothers, their babies, and midwives next year. With AIHW statistics showing only 15% of babies are breastfed after six months despite a 96% initial breastfeeding rate, it's hoped the project will change the way midwives help women to breastfeed.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  7 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
PMID:29249101
Autor:Theobald K; Campbell C
Título:REIMAGINING A FUTURE FOCUSED BACHELOR OF NURSING CURRICULA.
Fonte:Aust Nurs Midwifery J; 24(4):42, 2016 10.
ISSN:2202-7114
País de publicação:Australia
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Higher education providers of nursing education programs are charged with the responsibility to produce 'work ready' graduates to meet the changing demands of healthcare including a shift from acute care to home and community based chronic care (Primary health Care Advisory Group, 2015.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  8 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
PMID:29249100
Autor:Kunst EL; Mitchell ML; Johnston ANB
Título:ENGAGING STUDENTS IN ACUTE MENTAL HEALTHCARE.
Fonte:Aust Nurs Midwifery J; 24(4):41, 2016 10.
ISSN:2202-7114
País de publicação:Australia
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Mental health is an increasing component of the burden of disease worldwide, providing challenges in healthcare and health systems (World Health Organization, 2013); it is widespread, and not limited to dedicated mental health facilities.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  9 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
PMID:29249095
Autor:Driver C
Título:GOLD COAST SIMULATION SERVICE.
Fonte:Aust Nurs Midwifery J; 24(4):38, 2016 10.
ISSN:2202-7114
País de publicação:Australia
Idioma:eng
Resumo:There is plenty of evidence about how effective simulation education is in healthcare despite all the challenges it brings. The literature reflects improvement of not only technical and nontechnical skills in clinicians, but ultimately patient outcomes.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  10 / 7195 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
seleciona
para imprimir
Fotocópia
PMID:29249092
Autor:Fox A; Theobald K; Yates P
Título:NURSES REPORT FORMAL EDUCATION IMPROVES PRACTICE.
Fonte:Aust Nurs Midwifery J; 24(4):35, 2016 10.
ISSN:2202-7114
País de publicação:Australia
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Increased demand for colonoscopy procedures has led to the introduction of nurse endoscopist in Australia. Evidence suggests that nurse endoscopy is safe and effective (Williams et al. 2009).
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE



página 1 de 720 ir para página                         
   


Refinar a pesquisa
  Base de dados : MEDLINE Formulário avançado   

    Pesquisar no campo  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/OPAS/OMS - Centro Latino-Americano e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde