Base de datos : MedCarib
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Fotocópia
Id: 13669
Autor: Potter, Irad M.
Título: Illness behaviour with special emphasis on self-medication: a survey of the diabetic and hypertensive clients of the August Town/Hermitage Community Health Centre, Kingston, Jamaica.
Fuente: Kingston; s.n; 1987. x,90 p. tab.
Idioma: En.
Tesis: Presentada en University of the West Indies (Mona) para obtención del grado de Master of Public Health.
Resumen: The illness and health related behaviour of people is a major concern of health workers and policy makers. A study was conducted among 97 residents of the August Town and Hermitage communities in Kingston, Jamaica, of clients who were diagnosed and being treated for diabetes mellitus and hypertension at the August Town/Hermitage Community Health Centre, Kingston. Data was collected by questionnaire and from the clients health centre records. The study was aimed at elucidating some of the determinants of the illness and health-related behaviour with special emphasis on the practice of self-medication using home remedies and non-prescription drugs. The study confirmed that self-medication was a common first line mode of therapy. This was also despite the finding of a predominantly negative attitude to self-treatment. In addition, clients relied heavily on friends and relatives for information concerning self-medication. No statistically significant relationship was found between self-medication and age, sex, marital status, occupation, crowding, perceived health status, illness, level of education, attitude and frequency of contact with the health services. It was recommended that since self-medication was a common practice, health workers should become conscious of this and develop educational programmes to capitalize on the positive aspects of this practice and monitor any possible deleterious effects (AU)
Responsable: JM23.1 - Main Library
JM23.1; U Thesis


  2 / 4 MedCarib  
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Fotocópia
Id: 9415
Autor: Harrison, Glynn; Holton, Anthony; Neilson, David; Owens, David; Boot, Daphne; Cooper, John.
Título: Severe mental disorder in Afro-Caribbean patients: some social, demographic and service factors
Fuente: Psychol med;19(3):683-96, Aug. 1989.
Idioma: En.
Resumen: Forty-two consecutively identified Afro-Caribbean patients with a first episode of psychosis were compared with a similar group of non-Caribbean patients. A number of differences emerged, although the same portion of patients in each group had symptoms for 6 months or more prior to psychiatric contact. Afro-Caribbean patients showed greater delay in seeking help, more `disturbance' later in the course of their illness and were more likely to be admitted compulsorily. The social geography of the two groups suggests that the high rates of schizophrenia and related psychoses that we previously reported cannot be explained simply by differences in area of residence at the time of presentation. (AU)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; Reprint Collection


  3 / 4 MedCarib  
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Fotocópia
Id: 3503
Autor: William, Sonja K. P.
Título: Health perceptions and self care response to illness among users of medical alternative health services in St. Andrew, Jamaica
Fuente: WEST INDIAN MED. J;45(3):78-81, Sept. 1996.
Idioma: En.
Resumen: Do persons who utilize the services of the alternative therapist demonstrate a greater self-care response to illness? This cross-sectional study was done to compare the health perceptions and self-care response to minor illness among users of conventional medical care and alternative therapy. Data were collected with a pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire to 99 patients of medical practitioner and 74 of alternative therapists. Results indicated statistically significant differences in some health perceptions such as ways to improve general health and responsibility for personal health. For both groups there were similarities in socio-demographic characteristics and self-care responses to minor illness, such as headaches, constipation, diarrhoea, sinus congestion and colds or flu. Also, results reflected a common practice of self-management of minor illness and an overlap in attendance by patients to both groups of practitioners. Recommendations are made for the public to be guided in its practice of self-management of minor illness and that a regulatory body be set up to govern the practice of alternative therapy in Jamaica. (AU)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R18.W4


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Fotocópia
Id: 3020
Autor: Alleyne, Sylvan I.
Título: Social indicators, illness behaviour and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus in Jamaica, West Indies.
Fuente: Kingston; s.n; 1987. 317 p. ilus.
Idioma: En.
Tesis: Presentada en University of the West Indies, Mona para obtención del grado de Ph.D.
Resumen: This dissertion presents the results of research which used interview techniques to obtain data that describe illness behaviour in diabetic patients who were either outpatients or hospitalized for complications of their illness. It also analyses mortality in Jamaican diabetics who died between 1970 and 1979. Quality of control of diabetes as determined by testing of urine or blood was a major dependent variable against which illness behaviour was evaluated. In general it was poor and this was associated with use of some bush teas. Positive attitudes towards compliance with the therapeutic regime and increased age were associated with better control. Knowledge of the illness, educational or socio-economic status had no effect on control. The appreciation of communicated information bore no relation to educational or socio-economic status. The most important finding was that only after experiencing a medical crisis did patients alter their perception of the seriousness of the illness to the extent that their compliance improved. Fear of the illness and its complications and financial difficulties were important factors affecting compliance. Mortality data from 8,799 diabetics showed that they accounted for 6.5 percent of all deaths in the 10 year period, with females having a higher risk of dying from diabetes than males. Life table analyses of data for 1977 showed that female and male diabetics had death rates of 79.36 and 45.56 per 100,000 stationary population respectively. Thus, the findings of this research quantify the magnitude of the problem of diabetes and show that the major determinant of illness behaviour in diabetes is the perceived susceptibility to and fear of the complications of the illness and consequent medical crises. (AU)
Responsable: JM23.1 - Main Library
JM23.1



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