Database : MedCarib
Search on : C03.335.508.700.700.799 [DeCS Category]
References found : 29 [refine]
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  1 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 15889
Author: Petana, Walter B.
Title: A survey for intestinal parasites in two communities in British Honduras, Central America
Source: Ann Trop Med Parasitol;62(4):518-21, Dec. 1968.
Language: En.
Abstract: A survey of intestinal parasites in two communities in British Honduras is described. Infection rates with the two species of parasitic helminths and protozoa were found to be high, and in need of further investigation. The reasons for the high parasitic infection rates are attributed to lack of hygiene, to ignorance of the dangers involved and to the absence of preventive and curative facilities.(Summary)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; RC960.A5


  2 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 15701
Author: Rodgers Johnson, Pamela E. B; Garruto, Ralph M; Yanagihara, Richard T; Gajdusek, D. Carlton.
Title: Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1: a retrovirus causing chronic myeloneuropathies in tropical and temperate climates
Source: Am J Hum Biol;2:429-38, 1990.
Language: En.
Abstract: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I), the first human retrovirus to be isolated, is the cause of endemic tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP). Originally, this chronic neurological disorder was described as a disease seen among blacks of low socioeconomic status living in tropical countries, and thus for many decades TSP remained a little known curiousty outside the endemic regions. The link between HTLV-I infection and TSP was made fortuitously, when antibodies to HTLV-I were found in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of TSP patients in Jamaica, Colombia, and Martinique. Soon thereafter a similar disorder, designated HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM), was reported from southern Japan. This broadened the geographic and ethnic boundaries of this chronic myelopathy and the disease has now been reported in multiple ethnic groups from more than 40 countries, in both tropical and temperate regions. The name TSP/HAM is now used to include all patients (regardless of race or country of origin) who have HTLV-I-positive endemic TSP or HAM. (AU)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; Reprint Collection


  3 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 14591
Author: Adam, Malcolm; Morgan, Owen St. C; Persaud, Clement R; Gibbs, William N.
Title: Hyperinfection syndrome with Strongyloides stercoralis in malignant lymphoma
Source: Br Med J;1(5848):264-6, Feb. 1973.
Language: En.
Abstract: Hyperinfection with Strongyloides stercoralis occurred in three patients with malignant lymphoma. The probable cause was alteration of the immune responses either as a result of the malignant lymphoma or by the treatment given. Though thiabendazole (Mintezol) has produced reasonable results in the treatment of the hyperinfection syndrome, preliminary data suggest that the new broad-spectrum antihelmintic levamisole (Ketrax) is more effective. All patients who live or have lived in an area where strongyloidiasis is endemic should be investigated to detect the presence of the nematode before and during treatment with drugs with immunosuppressive properties. In view of the high mortality with S. stercoralis hyperinfection, vigorous therapy should be instituted before the use of immunosuppressive drugs (Summary)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R31.B75


  4 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 14421
Author: Bartholomew, Courtney F; Butler, Alan K; Bhaskar, A. G; Jankey, Neville.
Title: Psuedo-obstruction and a sprue-like syndrome from stronglyloidiasis
Source: Postgrad Med J;53(617):139-42, Mar. 1977.
Language: En.
Abstract: Symptomatic diseases from Strongyloides stercoralis has been recognized for the first time in Trinidad. Five cases are reported, all showing clinical features suggestive of a sprue-like syndrome. Subtotal jejunal villous atrophy was seen in one case and partial villous atrophy in two. Three patients had laparotomies bacause of suspected partial intestinal obstruction. A sprue-like syndrome in certain Caribbean immigrants should arouse a suspicion of S. stercoralis (Summary)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R31.P6


  5 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 14269
Author: Robinson, Ralph D; Williams, Lawrence A. D; Lindo, John F; Terry, Shaughan I; Mansingh, Ajai.
Title: Inactivation of strongyloides stercoralis filariform larvae in vitro by six Jamaican plant extracts and three commercial antihelminthics
Source: West Indian med. j;39(4):213-17, Dec. 1990.
Language: En.
Abstract: In vitro bioassay of (a) aqueous methanol extracts (AME) of the green leaves of mimosa (Mimosa pudica), love weed (Cuscuta americana), vervine (Stachytarpheta jamaicensis), chicken weed (Salvia serotina) and breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis); (b) methanol-water fraction (MWF) of breadfruit leaves, and (c) commercially available drugs albendazole, thiabendazole and levamisole were assayed for nematode inactivating potential, using filariform larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. Test larvae were obtained from a 10-day-old charcoal coproculture. Bioassays were conducted in Locke's solution, using 100 larvae in each of three replicates. Inactivation was recorded microscopically at 1, 2, 6 and 12 hours, then every 24 hours up to 5 days' incubation. It(50) (time for inactivation of 50 percent of larvae) values read: levamisole and mimosa extract < 1 hour; love weed extract, approximately 2 hours; breadfruit (MWF), 9.5 hours; chicken weed, 20 hours; albendazole, 35 hours; breadfruit (AME), 49 hours; thiabendazole, 74 hours and vervine extract, 81.5 hours. It(95) values followed a similar trend, and were approximately double the It(50) measures. A potential role for locally available natural products in the treatment of strongyloidiasis is highlighted (AU)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R18.W4


  6 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 13666
Author: Persaud, Clement R.
Title: Laboratory and field studies on the Jamaican strain of human Strongyloides.
Source: Kingston; s.n; Jan. 1973. 275 p. ills, tab.
Language: En.
Thesis: Submitted to University of the West Indies (Mona) presented for the degree Doctor of Philosophy.
Abstract: Laboratory and field studies were done on the Jamaican strain of human Strongyloides. In the laboratory, optimal conditions for propagations of the free-living cycle were investigated. The mongrel puppy was employed as a model for the exploration of various aspects of host-strongyloid relationships. The histological reaction to normal skin to penetrating larvae, and of sensitised skin to larvae, excretory-secretory ("ES") and somatic ("S") antigen, was determined. Enzymatic activities of falariform larvae were assayed in vitro. Several factors predisposing to autoinfection were examined. The anthelmintic activity of levamisole and thiabendazole was compared. In the field, a follow-up study was done and pilot surveys for prevalence were conducted throughout Jamaica in areas contrasting in climatic and physiographic features. The results indicated that optimal conditions for propagation of the heterogonic cycle existed at a temperature range of 26ºC to 30ºC, a pH range of 7.5 to 8.0, and a stool consistency equal to that of a very thick paste. The reaction of normal skin to invading larvae was essentially a non-specific, acute inflammatory response; with sensitised skin, there was significant degranulation of mast cells in the presence of larvae, "ES" and "S" antigen. Collagenase, galatinase, fibrinase, lipase and hyaluronidase activity of falariform larvae were demonstrated. Autoinfection was experimentally induced by constipation, by vincristine therapy, by ileal ligation and by simulation of ileal volvulus. A general hypothesis was advanced to explain the etiology of autoinfection. Levamisole possessed statistically significantly greater anthelmintic activity than thiabendazole against Strongyloides in vitro, but not in vivo in puppies. It was unable to eradicate the parasite completely from the stools of five out of six infected patients. Preliminary data suggest that the chronicity of strongyloidiasis in Jamaican patients is due to internal autoinfection rather than external reinfection. The low prevalence of the infection in the general population is very low (30 out of 1,555 persons positive, or 1.9 percent)(AU)
Responsable: JM23.1 - Main Library
JM23.1; U Thesis


  7 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 13108
Author: Grell, Gerald A. C.
Title: Medical disorders in a small Caribbean island: an analysis of the diseases of adults in Dominica in 1972 and 1973
Source: Ann Trop Med Parasitol;70(1):1-10, Mar. 1976.
Language: En.
Abstract: An analysis was undertaken, for the first time, of the total picture of the medical disorders of adults on a small Caribbean island. At present non-infectious diseases, especially diabetes and hypertension, are of major importance. Parasitic infestation of the gut occurred in 50-60 percent of the hospital population. The pattern of diseases indicates that the island is in a transitional stage of its medical development, and that resources need to be directed to the curative as well as to public health programmes. The impact of pecularities of local geography and customs are discussed as contributing to some of the more unusual diseases of the Caribbean.(Summary)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; RC960.A5


  8 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 11411
Author: Rawlins, Samuel C; Terry, Shaughan I; Chen, Winston N.
Title: Some laboratory, epidemiological and clinical features of strongyloides stercoralis infection in a focus of low endemicity
Source: West Indian med. j;32(4):212-8, Dec. 1983.
Language: En.
Abstract: Data are presented on the prevalence of strongyloidiasis in patients seen at the University Hospital of the West Indies during the period January, 1980 - December, 1981. Only 1 percent of all stool samples was positive for strongyloides; 46 percent of all cases occurred in the 46-55 year-old group, and 64 percent of the cases were in males. There was a mean higher larval density (300-500 larvae/ml stool) in the 26-65-year-old groups. Also, there was a direct relationship between morbidity and larval density in stools. Asymptomatic cases had a very low infestation rate (<100-larvae/ml stool), and were generally in the younger age group (mean age, 18 years). Mildly symptomatic (100-350 larvae/ml), severely symptomatic (350-500 larvae/ml) and suspected hyperinfected patients (>1000 larvae/ml), did not fall into statistically significantly different age groups (mean age, 50 years). An example is given of the difficulty of managing one of the suspected hyperinfected cases. The patient was repeatedly treated with effective doses of thiabendazole (750 mg twice daily for 10 days) but there was recurrence of infestation. Most of the mean monthly cases were detected in November, 2 months after the peak of the wet season. There was no statistically significant correlation between case detection and precipitation (AU)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R18.W4


  9 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 8124
Author: Robinson, Ralph D; Lindo, John F; Neva, Franklin A; Gam, Albert A; Vogel, P; Terry, Shaughan I; Cooper, Edward S.
Title: Immunoepidemiologic studies of Strongyloides stercoralis and human T lymphoropic virus type I infection in Jamaica
Source: J Infect Dis;169(3):692-6, Mar. 1994.
Language: En.
Abstract: Epidemilogic investigations of Strongyloides stercoralis and human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infections were conducted. Of 312 persons contacted, 209 (67 percent) provided blood and stool samples. Prevalences of S. stercoralis and HTLV-I antibodies were 26.8 percent and 8.1 percent (n = 198), respectively, and S. stercoralis larvae were detected in 4 percent. HTLV-I antibodies were significantly more common in persons positive for S. stercoralis larvae (10 [58.8 percent] of 17) compared with seropositive larvae-negative (4 [8.9 percent] of 45) or seronegative persons (9 [6.2 percent] of145) (P< .002). IgE levels increased with age in S. stercoralis-seropositive persons who were HTLV-I negative (P, .))2). However, there was an age-related depression of serum IgE in HTLV-I-positive persons (P < .003) that was sufficient to annul the IgE level-raising effect of S stercoralis seropositivity. The data provide evidence that HTLV-I infection is associated with increased frequency of larvae in the stool of S. stercoralis-infected persons and suggest that the mechanism may involve suppression of the IgE response (AU)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R11.J71


  10 / 29 MedCarib  
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Id: 6689
Author: Murphy, C. P; Terry, Shaughan I; Golden, Michael H. N; Bundy, Donald A. P.
Title: Whole gut irrigation in strongyloidiasis - abstract
Source: West Indian med. j;34(suppl):38, 1985.
Language: En.
Conference: Present in: Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council 30th Scientific Meeting, Kingstown, Apr. 24-27, 1985.
Abstract: Two patients with chronic Strongyloidiasis, refractory to conventional therapy, were studied by whole gut irrigation and high-dose antihelminthic therapy. Saline (0.9 percent) was given via naso-gastric tube at 50 ml per minute. After solid material was cleared, the gut effluent was collected in 10-minute samples. After one hour baseline collection, mebendazole (1,800 mg in patient 1) or levamisole (1,100 mg in patient 2) was given. Irrigation and collection continued for a further 140 and 170 minutes respectively. Parasitic forms were collected and counted in each sample. In the mebendazole treated patient the spontaneous egg- and larval-shedding rate was 1,501/minute. This was not affected by mebendazole treatment. Adults first appeared in the effluent at 1 hour after treatment and the numbers were increasing at the termination of the infusion. Nineteen adults were recovered. Follow-up showed no diminution in the intensity of infection, demonstrating that only a small proportion of the available adults had been recovered or expelled. In the levamisole treated patient, the pre-treatment effluent contained 49,041 larvae/minute and no adult forms. In contrast to mebendazole, after treatment with levamisole, there was a massive efflux of adults which had not returned to baseline after 3 hours; 88,729 adults were recovered. The post-treatment infection level was reduced dramatically and a further 15,000 adults were recovered within 24 hours. There was no increase in larval output with levamisole. It is concluded that neither mebendazole nor levamisole has a direct on Strongyloides larvae. However, they are both active against the adult forms, with the potency of levamisole appearing to be greater than that of mebendazole. Treatment with these drugs may have to continue for longer than the full maturation time of endogenous larvae. This may be in excess of 4 weeks (AU)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R18.W4



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