Database : MedCarib
Search on : E05.318.372.500.750.500 [DeCS Category]
References found : 50 [refine]
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Id: 17780
Author: Adesiyun, A. A. (aut); Kaminjolo, J. S. (aut); Ngeleka, M. (aut); Mutani, A. (aut); Borde, G. (aut); Harewood, W. (aut); Harper, W. (aut).
Title: A longitudinal study on enteropathogenic infections of livestock in Trinidad
Source: Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical;34(1):29-35, Jan.-Feb. 2001. tab.
Language: en.
Abstract: A longitudinal study was conducted on selected livestock farms to determine the prevalence of enteropathogens in diarrhoeic and non-diarrhoeic animals. The enteropathogens assayed from faecal samples and rectal swabs were bacteria (Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp. Salmonella spp. and Yersinia enterocolitica), parasites (coccidia, gastrointestinal nematodes and Cryptosporidium spp.) and viruses (group A rotavirus and parvovirus). The prevalence of the enteropathogens in various animal species was related to age and month of the year. Generally, younger animals presented a higher prevalence of infection by enteropathogens than older animals while most infections occurred between the months of January and April.
Responsable: TT5 - Médical Sciences Library


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Id: 17778
Author: Gopee, N. V. (aut); Adesiyun, A. A. (aut); Caesar, K. (aut).
Title: Retrospective and longitudinal study of salmonellosis in captive wildlife in Trinidad
Source: Journal of wildlife diseases;36(2):284-293, Apr. 2000. tab.
Language: en.
Abstract: Morbidity and mortality of captive wildlife at the Emperor Valley Zoo, Trinidad from 1993 to 1996 were analysed to determine involvement of Salmonella spp. A 6 mo longitudinal study was conducted to determine the frequency of isolation of Salmonella spp. from apparently healthy, sick and dead wild mammals, birds, and reptiles. The antibiograms of Salmonella isolates were determined using the disc diffusion method. Fecal samples randomly selected from animal enclosures and cloacal swabs of snakes were cultured for Salmonella spp. following enrichment in tetrathionate and selenite cystine broths. For the 1993-96 period, Salmonella spp. was implicated in 17 (12%) of 141 sick or dead animals and the predominant serotype was S. typhimurium. During the 6 mo prospective study in a mean animal population of 1,186, there were 20 (2%) and 14 (1%) animals that were sick and died respectively; Salmonella spp. was implicated in only one mortality. Overall, of 1,012 samples from apparently healthy wildlife cultured, 66 (7%) yielded 24 serotypes of Salmonella. The predominant serotype were S. seigburg (16 isolates), S. gaminara (6 isolates), and S. thompson (6 isolates). None of the samples yielded S. typhimurium. The frequency of isolation of Salmonella spp. in reptiles (14%) was significantly higher than found in either mammals (7%) or birds (3%). Sixty-five (99%) of 66 Salmonella spp. isolates exhibited resistance to one or more of the nine antimicrobial agents tested. Resistance was high to cephalothin (92%), moderate to streptomycin (35%) and tetracycline (29%), but significantly low to gentamicin (2%), chloramphenicol (0%), and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (0%). The prevalence of asymptomatic infections by Salmonella spp. in zoo animals was high and the very high prevalence of antimicrobial resistance could be a problem when treating salmonellosis.
Responsable: TT5 - Médical Sciences Library
TT5; W1, JO972D


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Id: 15789
Author: Waterlow, John C.
Title: Observations on the suckling's dilemma - a personal view
Source: J Hum Nutr;35(2):85-98, Apr. 1981.
Language: En.
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; reprint collection


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Id: 14727
Author: Doherty, Justin F; Adam, E. J; Griffin, G. E; Golden, Michael H. N.
Title: Ultrasonographic assessment of the extent of hepatic steatosis in severe malnutrition
Source: Arch Dis Child;67(11):1348-52, Nov. 1992.
Language: En.
Abstract: Ultrasonographic, blinded assessment was made of the extent of hepatic steatosis in 55 children with severe malnutrition: undernutrion (n=6), marasmus (n=18), marasmic-kwashiorkor (n=17), and kwashiorkor (n=14). The children were examined on admission, in early recovery (considered as baseline), and again discharge. Eleven healthy control children and eight of the previously malnourished children were studied as comparison groups. Both oedematous and non-oedematous malnourished children had significantly more steatosis than the comparison groups at each time. Children with oedematous malnutrition had significantly greater steatosis than non-oedematous children at admission, Half of the non-oedematous malnourished children had appreciable hepatic steatosis at both admission and at baseline. Hepatic fat was only slowly mobilised. The rate constant was 1.4 ± 0.3 percent/day. One quarter of the children did not change steatosis grades during the period they were in hospital. There was no overall correlation between the extent of steatosis and liver size. Hepatic steatosis in childhood malnutrition is not confined to oedematous children: it is frequently present in marasmic and under-nourished children. Its extent is not necessarily related to the degree of hepatomegaly and accumulated lipid is only slowly mobilised (AU)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; RJ1.A7


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Id: 14588
Author: Miall, William E; Lovell, Howard G.
Title: Relation between change of blood pressure and age
Source: Br Med J;2(5553):660-4, June 1967.
Language: En.
Abstract: Data obtained from the longitidunal surveys of arterial blood pressure in two general population samples have been used to examine the relation between change of blood pressure, the mean pressure attained, and age. It has been shown, by multiple regression analysis of change of pressure on mean pressure and age, that in these populations changes in pressure during intervals of 10 and 8 1/2 years are highly significant related to mean pressures, but only indirectly related to age. This implies that ageing plays no direct part in determining the rate of change of pressure; age appears to play a part soley because the blood-pressure changes are positive and increase with higher pressures. If change of pressure is determined by attained pressure, this would explain the observation that some individuals and some races show no apparent increase of pressure with age, and would partly reconcile the conflicting views on the nature of unexplained hypertension. However, the evidence has shown only association, not causality (Summary)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R31.B75


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Id: 14581
Author: Miall, William E.
Title: Implications of the relation between blood pressure and age
Source: In: Kass, Edward H. Preventive approaches to chronic diseases. New York, Milbank Memorial Fund, July 1969. p.107-15. (Milbank Mem Fund Q, 47, 3).
Language: En.
Conference: Present in: Conference on Chronic Diseases, Boston, June 1969.
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R11.M88


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Id: 14454
Author: Hayes, Richard J; Beckford, Marjorie; Grandison, Yvonne G; Mason, Karlene P; Serjeant, Beryl E; Serjeant, Graham R.
Title: The haematology of steady state homozygous sickle cell disease: frequency distibutions, variation with age and sex, longitudinal observations
Source: Br J Haematol;59(2):369-82, Feb. 1985.
Language: En.
Abstract: The steady state haematological characteristics observed in 1071 patients with homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease aged 5-66 years are presented (Summary)
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; RB145.A1B7


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Id: 14341
Author: Walker, Susan P; Grantham McGregor, Sally M.
Title: Growth and development of the West Indian children. Part 1 growth
Source: West Indian med. j;38(4):197-204, Dec. 1989.
Language: En.
Responsable: JM3.1 - Médical Library
JM3.1; R18.W4


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Id: 13652
Author: Wong, Michael S.
Title: The role of environmental and host behavioural factors in determining exposure to infection with Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura.
Source: Kingston; s.n; 1988. xx,209 p. tab, ills.
Language: En.
Thesis: Submitted to University of the West Indies (Mona) presented for the degree Doctor of Philosophy in Zoology.
Abstract: This study examines the contribution of environmental and host behavioural factors to the rate of reinfection with geohelminths in children. Preceeding the field study, two practical procedures for estimating these factors were developed and standardised: first, a method, based on existing procedures, for extracting parasite eggs from soil samples; and second, an original method, based on the assessment of soil-derived silica from faeces, for quantifying the rate of soil ingestion (geophagia) by the study children In the field study, exposure of Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura was examined longitudinally at two Places-of-Safety (childrens' homes) in urban Kingston, Jamaica. At the start of the study, existing helminth infections were chemotherapeutically removed from the study populations who then naturally reacquired infection during a three month exposure period. At the end of this period the infection intensity was determined. Exposure to infection was quantified by estimating the rate of ingestion of geohelminth eggs throughout the study period. This was achieved by determining the density of eggs in the soil and the rate of soil ingestion. The eggs of both geohelminths were recovered from the soil at both localities. The mean egg densities ranged from 0.05 to 4.0 epg-soil. The eggs were overdispersed at the other. The estimated rate of egg ingestion (of each species) was overdispersed among the two populations. At the home with young children of relatively uniform age, there was a significant correlation between the rate of egg ingestion and the reacquired infection intensity: subjects who have a high rate of egg ingestion have high worm burdens. This correlation was not significant for the population of older children who were heterogeneous in age. It is suggested that the older subjects may have shown more restrained geophagic behaviour. Additionally, those who were more homogeneous in age, and perhaps susceptible to infection, tended to show a more direct relationship between the rates of egg ingestion and parasite establishment. The study demonstrated that the number of parasites established in the host was of the same order of magnitude as the number of eggs ingested from soil. This implies that for the study populations, soil ingestion is a major source of geohelminth infection (AU)
Responsable: JM23.1 - Main Library
JM23.1; U Thesis


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Id: 13647
Author: Nair, Rajendra G.
Title: Hepatic glutathione S-transferase release after multiple halothane anaesthesia.
Source: Kingston; s.n; 1989. xiv,156 p. tab.
Language: En.
Thesis: Submitted to University of the West Indies (Mona) presented for the degree Doctor of Medicine (Anaesthesia).
Abstract: Halothane is a commonly used anaethetic in paediatric practice. However, it is thought to be hepatotoxic. This study was designed to examine the effects of both single and multiple halothane anaesthesia on liver function. Heaptic glutathione S-transferase (GST) was also examined as a possible index of acute liver damage. The study group consisted of ten children who had consumed corrosive substances. This group was subdivided into two groups, depending on the number of halothane exposures, the single and the multiple halothane group. These children were compared with a surgical (n=5) and a ketamine control group (n=5). All children were studied prospectively over a 24hr. period, and the trend of liver enzyme release following anaesthesia measured. In addition, the children in the multiple halothane group were studied longitudinally. Four children from the study group, exhibited dramatic increases in the B1 subunit of liver specific GST, 24 hours after anaethesia. Twelve studies showed an early transient rise in total plasma GST, between the end of anaesthesia and 6 hrs. after. Six studies exhibited marked secondary rise at 24 hrs. after anaesthesia. These data indicate two possible phases of liver dysfunction following halothane anaesthesia. Significant changes in the level of aminotransferases were observed in the multiple halothane group, suggesting that measurement of these liver enzymes are still useful as indices of liver dysfunction following multiple halothane exposure. Cellular antioxidant systems were also measured to examine the relationship between halothane exposure and oxidative stress. A significant increase (p<0.05) in red cell GST was noted in the multiple halothane group, indicating that these children are in fact subjected to chronic oxidant stress. Collectively, these data indicate a transient impairment of hepatocellular integrity following multiple halothane exposures, despite lack of clinical evidence of hepatotoxicity. It is recommended that children undergoing repeated halothane anaesthesia be examined carefully for possible hepatic dysfunction (AU)
Responsable: JM23.1 - Main Library
JM23.1; U Thesis



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