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  1 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27278907
Autor:Lussi A; Schaffner M; Jaeggi T
Endereço:Klinik für Zahnerhaltung, Präventiv- und Kinderzahnmedizin Zahnmedizinische Kliniken der Universität Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
Título:[Diagnosis of dental erosions].
Título:Die Diagnose dentaler Erosionen..
Fonte:Swiss Dent J; 126(5):466-7, 2016.
ISSN:2296-6498
País de publicação:Switzerland
Idioma:ger
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  2 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:26995845
Autor:Mechanic E
Título:Interdisciplinary Treatment Planning "What Would You Do If She Were Your Daughter?".
Fonte:Dent Today; 35(2):108, 110-1, 2016 Feb.
ISSN:8750-2186
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Tipo de publicação: CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
Nome de substância:0 (Composite Resins); 0 (Dental Materials)


  3 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:26835522
Autor:Fradeani M; Barducci G; Bacherini L
Título:Esthetic rehabilitation of a worn dentition with a minimally invasive prosthetic procedure (MIPP).
Fonte:Int J Esthet Dent; 11(1):16-35, 2016.
ISSN:2198-591X
País de publicação:Germany
Idioma:eng
Resumo:A minimally invasive prosthetic procedure (MIPP) for the esthetic rehabilitation of the complete arch advocates the preservation of enamel to optimize the adhesive bond of the luting agent to both the tooth surface and the etchable ceramic restoration. When esthetic rehabilitation of a worn dentition is required, a MIPP can be selected to reduce the biological cost of removing additional enamel tooth structure. The fundamental steps to achieve this goal are to: (1) increase the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO); (2) reduce the thickness of the monolithic ceramic material; (3) preserve the enamel during tooth preparation; and (4) adhesively bond the etchable ceramic restorations. This article presents a comprehensive, minimally invasive prosthetic treatment approach for the esthetic rehabilitation of a severely worn dentition using a lithium disilicate all-ceramic material with partial and complete coverage restorations.
Tipo de publicação: CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
Nome de substância:0 (Resin Cements); 0 (lithia disilicate); 12001-21-7 (Dental Porcelain)


  4 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:26798908
Autor:Noble W; Hakim F; Nattestad A; Poe D
Título:Multidisciplinary Management of Severe Tooth Surface Loss: A Case Report.
Fonte:J Calif Dent Assoc; 43(10):579-84, 2015 Oct.
ISSN:1043-2256
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Tipo de publicação: CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE


  5 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:26556515
Autor:Kontaxopoulou I; Alam S
Endereço:King's College London Dental Institute, UK.
Título:Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.
Fonte:Prim Dent J; 4(3):25-9, 2015 Aug.
ISSN:2050-1684
País de publicação:England
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE
Nome de substância:0 (Acids); 0 (Toothpastes)


  6 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:26506808
Autor:Yule PL; Barclay SC
Título:Worn Down by Toothwear? Aetiology, Diagnosis and Management Revisited.
Fonte:Dent Update; 42(6):525-6, 529-30, 532, 2015 Jul-Aug.
ISSN:0305-5000
País de publicação:England
Idioma:eng
Resumo:The incidence of toothwear in the population is increasing, as is the number of referrals regarding this problem to secondary care dental hospital consultants and specialists. This paper outlines current theories in aetiology, diagnosis and management of localized and generalized toothwear, as well as describing clinical tips for assessing such patients.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE
Nome de substância:0 (Dental Materials)


  7 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:26252380
Autor:Pérez-Barbería FJ; Carranza J; Sánchez-Prieto C
Endereço:The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, AB15 8QH, Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom; Ungulate Research Unit, CRCP, University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain; Grupo PAIDI RNM118, Estación Biológica de Doñana, CSIC, Sevilla, 41092, Spain.
Título:Wear Fast, Die Young: More Worn Teeth and Shorter Lives in Iberian Compared to Scottish Red Deer.
Fonte:PLoS One; 10(8):e0134788, 2015.
ISSN:1932-6203
País de publicação:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Teeth in Cervidae are permanent structures that are not replaceable or repairable; consequently their rate of wear, due to the grinding effect of food and dental attrition, affects their duration and can determine an animal's lifespan. Tooth wear is also a useful indicator of accumulative life energy investment in intake and mastication and their interactions with diet. Little is known regarding how natural and sexual selection operate on dental structures within a species in contrasting environments and how these relate to life history traits to explain differences in population rates of tooth wear and longevity. We hypothesised that populations under harsh environmental conditions should be selected for more hypsodont teeth while sexual selection may maintain similar sex differences within different populations. We investigated the patterns of tooth wear in males and females of Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) in Southern Spain and Scottish red deer (C. e. scoticus) across Scotland, that occur in very different environments, using 10343 samples from legal hunting activities. We found higher rates of both incisor and molar wear in the Spanish compared to Scottish populations. However, Scottish red deer had larger incisors at emergence than Iberian red deer, whilst molars emerged at a similar size in both populations and sexes. Iberian and Scottish males had earlier tooth depletion than females, in support of a similar sexual selection process in both populations. However, whilst average lifespan for Iberian males was 4 years shorter than that for Iberian females and Scottish males, Scottish males only showed a reduction of 1 year in average lifespan with respect to Scottish females. More worn molars were associated with larger mandibles in both populations, suggesting that higher intake and/or greater investment in food comminution may have favoured increased body growth, before later loss of tooth efficiency due to severe wear. These results illustrate how independent selection in both subspecies, that diverged 11,700 years BP, has resulted in the evolution of different longevity, although sexual selection has maintained a similar pattern of relative sex differences in tooth depletion. This study opens interesting questions on optimal allocation in life history trade-offs and the independent evolution of allopatric populations.
Tipo de publicação: COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


  8 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:26048367
Autor:Fiorenza L; Kullmer O
Endereço:Earth Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia; Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia. Electronic address: lfiorenz@une.edu.au.
Título:Dental wear patterns in early modern humans from Skhul and Qafzeh: A response to Sarig and Tillier.
Fonte:Homo; 66(5):414-9, 2015 Oct.
ISSN:1618-1301
País de publicação:Germany
Idioma:eng
Resumo:The use of teeth as tools for manipulating objects and simple food-processing methods was common among prehistoric and modern hunter-gatherer human populations. Paramasticatory uses of teeth frequently produce enamel chipping and distinctive types of dental wear that can readily be related to specific tool functions. In particular, the presence of unusual occlusal wear areas (named para-facets) on maxillary teeth of prehistoric, historic and modern hunter-gatherers has been associated with cultural habits involving extensive use of teeth (Fiorenza et al., 2011; Fiorenza and Kullmer, 2013). However, Sarig and Tillier (2014) believe that this wear had been caused by pathological occlusal relationships rather than by the use of teeth as tools. In this contribution, we show how occlusal contacts are created and how it is possible to distinguish between masticatory and non-masticatory wear facets by using an innovative digital approach called Occlusal Fingerprint Analysis. Statistical results from the analysis of comparative modern samples clearly demonstrate that described para-facets in Skhul and Qafzeh could not have been produced by dental occlusal anomalies such as malocclusions and crossbites. Moreover, dental pathologies in prehistoric humans were extremely rare. Only with the adoption of the modern lifestyle between 18th and 19th centuries, did the emergence of malocclusions become significantly more common. Because more than 50% of the Skhul and Qafzeh individuals analysed in our study are characterised by this distinctive type of wear, it is highly unlikely that their para-facets occurred as a result of dental pathologies.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


  9 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:25594367
Autor:Wu YQ; Arsecularatne JA; Hoffman M
Endereço:School of Materials Science and Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney 2052, Australia. Electronic address: yun-qi.wu@unsw.edu.au.
Título:Effect of acidity upon attrition-corrosion of human dental enamel.
Fonte:J Mech Behav Biomed Mater; 44:23-34, 2015 Apr.
ISSN:1878-0180
País de publicação:Netherlands
Idioma:eng
Resumo:Attrition-corrosion is a synthesized human enamel wear process combined mechanical effects (attrition) with corrosion. With the rising consumption of acidic food and beverages, attrition-corrosion is becoming increasingly common. Yet, research is limited and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, in vitro wear loss of human enamel was investigated and the attrition-corrosion process and wear mechanism were elucidated by the analysis of the wear scar and its subsurface using focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Human enamel flat-surface samples were prepared with enamel cusps as the wear antagonists. Reciprocating wear testing was undertaken under load of 5N at the speed of 66 cycle/min for 2250 cycles with lubricants including citric acid (at pH 3.2 and 5.5), acetic acid (at pH 3.2 and 5.5) and distilled water. All lubricants were used at 37°C. Similar human enamel flat-surface samples were also exposed to the same solutions as a control group. The substance loss of enamel during wear can be linked to the corrosion potential of a lubricant used. Using a lubricant with very low corrosion potential (such as distilled water), the wear mechanism was dominated by delamination with high wear loss. Conversely, the wear mechanism changed to shaving of the softened layer with less material loss in an environment with medium corrosion potential such as citric acid at pH 3.2 and 5.5 and acetic acid at pH 5.5. However, a highly corrosive environment (e.g., acetic acid at pH 3.2) caused the greatest loss of substance during wear.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE


  10 / 636 MEDLINE  
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PMID:25848792
Autor:Struzycka I; Rusyan E; Boguslawska-Kapala A
Endereço:Department of Integrated Dentistry, Warsaw Medical University.
Título:Prevalence of dental erosion in young adults aged 18 years in Poland.
Fonte:Przegl Epidemiol; 68(4):689-93, 2014.
ISSN:0033-2100
País de publicação:Poland
Idioma:eng; pol
Resumo:AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of tooth wear in young adults in Poland. METHODS: A total of 1,886 persons aged 18 years, selected on a basis of multistage sampling, were examined within the Nationwide Dental Health Monitoring Programme. Previously calibrated dentists measured tooth wear using the BEWE-scoring system (Basic Erosive Wear Examination). RESULTS: Out of 1,886 young adults, 42.2% presented the signs of dental erosion. Considered the severity of erosion, it was graded as 1, 2 and 3 in 28.9%, 11.9% and 1.5% of 18-year-olds, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Results of clinical assessment of dental erosion in 18-year-old young adults revealed that erosive tooth wear is an important problem in this age group. Of them, 13.4% had signs of advanced tooth wear which may lead to serious clinical problems in the future.
Tipo de publicação: JOURNAL ARTICLE



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